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For When She's Feeling Blue is Edgar Holmes' second collection of poetry (after his bestselling debut 'Her Favorite Color Was Yellow'). It is a message of hope and inspiration for when she needs it most.
Her Favorite Color Was Yellow is Edgar Holmes' debut collection of poetry. It is an ode to his muse, his all-consuming love, his everything- how it feels to find love, lose it, and get it back. Pour yourself some coffee and curl up with this book to let yourself feel something beautiful and true. - Edgar Holmes' second poetry book, For When She's Feeling Blue, is available now. - [email protected]
Wow! Mom's boyfriend Max has invited Amber and her mom to Walla Walla, Washington for Thanksgiving. And Amber's dad is coming home from Paris to live nearby. Life couldn't be better. Until Amber's dad calls. He's expecting Amber to spend Thanksgiving with him in New York City. And the grownups are leaving it up to Amber to decide what to do.Suddenly, Amber feels as if she is in the middle of a bad dream...which only gets worse when she goes to school and meets the new girl -- Kelly Green. No way...no one in the class has ever had a two-color name like Amber Brown. Hannah Burton smirks and says, "Let the color wars begin!" Home. School. Nothing is going right. What to do? Amber Brown is feeling blue.
New York Times bestselling author Elizabeth Berg takes us to Chicago at the time of World War II in this wonderful story about three sisters, their lively Irish family, and the men they love. As the novel opens, Kitty and Louise Heaney say good-bye to their boyfriends Julian and Michael, who are going to fight overseas. On the domestic front, meat is rationed, children participate in metal drives, and Tommy Dorsey and Glenn Miller play songs that offer hope and lift spirits. And now the Heaney sisters sit at their kitchen table every evening to write letters–Louise to her fiancé, Kitty to the man she wishes fervently would propose, and Tish to an ever-changing group of men she meets at USO dances. In the letters the sisters send and receive are intimate glimpses of life both on the battlefront and at home. For Kitty, a confident, headstrong young woman, the departure of her boyfriend and the lessons she learns about love, resilience, and war will bring a surprise and a secret, and will lead her to a radical action for those she loves. The lifelong consequences of the choices the Heaney sisters make are at the heart of this superb novel about the power of love and the enduring strength of family. From the Hardcover edition.
The Alex Award–winning novel of a young gay man’s search for meaning—from an author whose “voice is more than just honest or original; it’s real” (The Plain Dealer). Meet seventeen-year-old Noah York, the hilariously profane, brutally honest, completely engaging narrator of Bart Yates’s astonishing debut novel. With a mouth like a truck driver and eyes that see through the lies of the world, Noah is heading into a life that’s only getting more complicated by the day. His dead father is fading into a snapshot memory, and his psycho-poet mother has relocated them from Chicago to a rural New England hamlet that looks like a bad advertisement for small-town America. The house he now lives in is literally coming apart at the seams as he and his mother renovate the old Victorian—in which they discover disturbing clues to the mysterious existence of a woman who disappeared decades before. While his mother grows more obsessed with the mysterious woman, Noah fights his own troubling—but irresistible—obsession with the boy next door, the enigmatic J.D. It is J.D. who begins to quietly anchor Noah to his new life. J.D., who is hiding a terrible, haunting pain of his own that will affect Noah in ways he never thought possible . . . Part Portnoy, part Holden Caulfield, never less than truthful, and always fully human, Noah York is a touching and unforgettable character whose “blunt, funny and dead-on narrative” is sure to entertain and entrance readers (Brian Malloy).
Everyone feels “down” sometimes. Who wouldn’t feel blue if their best friend moved away or if they were being teased or bullied in school? Counselor and clinical psychologist James J. Crist has written a book that kids can turn to for support, encouragement, and ideas for coping when they feel bad, sad, grumpy, or lonely. Kids learn 10 “Blues Busters” to help shake those unhappy feelings. They also discover lots of ideas they can use to talk about feelings, take care of themselves, boost their self-esteem, make and keep friends, and enjoy their alone time. A special section addresses hard-to-handle problems like grief, roller-coaster feelings, and depression. Includes resources and a Note to Grown-Ups.
Colorful and enlightening vignettes about life by everyday people in their seventies, eighties, and nineties. When social worker Wendy Lustbader was asked to take down the histories of residents in a retirement community, she discovered that "the man with Alzheimer's in room 410" was actually ninety-six-year-old Ole Harlen, a former concert pianist. "The woman who people-watches in the lobby" was really Lila Lane, who eloped to Tijuana with her sweetheart at age sixteen, and who at age seventy-five bemoaned the fact that she could no longer wear high heels. Lustbader gathered these stories and more into What's Worth Knowing, a compilation of unforgettable first-person testimonials on love, truth, grief, faith, and fulfillment by people in their seventies, eighties, and nineties. Israel Grosskoff, for example, describes learning about trust while hiding from the Nazis during World War II. Giuseppe Maestriami passes on child-rearing lessons he discovered through growing prize-winning tomatoes. And Arsene St. Amand talks about the importance of making time for love-which he found for the first time only six months before his death. In What's Worth Knowing, readers can spend time with Ole, Lila, Israel, Giuseppe, and Arsene-and a hundred others, whose wisdom matters all the more because of the way they've acquired it.

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