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Freeman's: Family is the second literary anthology in the series reviewers are calling 'illuminating' (National Public Radio) and 'sure to become a classic in years to come' (San Francisco Chronicle). Following a debut issue on the theme arrival, Freeman circles a new topic that affects us all: family. Often family is a conduit into the past. In an essay called 'Crossroads,' Aminatta Forna muses on the legacy of slavery and her childhood in Sierra Leone as she settles her family in Washington, DC, where she is constantly accused of cutting in line whenever she stands next to her white husband. Families are hardly stable entities, so many writers discover. Award-winning novelist Claire Vaye Watkins delivers a stunning portrait of a woman in the throes of postpartum depression. Booker Prize winner Marlon James takes the focus off absent fathers to write about his mother, who calls to sing him happy birthday every year. Even in the darkest moments, humour abounds. In Claire Messud's home there are two four-legged tyrants; Sandra Cisneros writes about her extended family of past lovers; and Aleksandar Hemon tells the story of his uncle's desperate attempt to remain a communist despite decades in the Soviet gulag. With fiction, nonfiction and poetry from literary heavyweights and up-and-coming writers alike, Freeman's: Family collects the most amusing, heartbreaking and probing stories about family life emerging today.
The third literary anthology in the series that has been called 'ambitious' (O Magazine) and 'strikingly international' (Boston Globe), Freeman's: Home, continues to push boundaries in diversity and scope, with stunning new pieces from emerging writers and literary luminaries alike. As the refugee crisis continues to convulse whole swathes of the world and there are daily updates about the rise of homelessness in different parts of America, the idea and meaning of home is at the forefront of many people's minds. Viet Thanh Nguyen harks to an earlier age of displacement with a haunting piece of fiction about the middle passage made by those fleeing Vietnam after the war. Rabih Alameddine brings us back to the present, as he leaves his mother's Beirut apartment to connect with Syrian refugees who are building a semblance of normalcy, and even beauty, in the face of so much loss. Home can be a complicated place to claim, because of race - the everyday reality of which Danez Smith explores in a poem about a chance encounter at a bus stop - or because of other types of fraught history. In 'Vacationland,' Kerri Arsenault returns to her birthplace of Mexico, Maine, a paper mill boomtown turned ghost town, while Xiaolu Guo reflects on her childhood in a remote Chinese fishing village with grandparents who married across a cultural divide. Many readers and writers turn to literature to find a home: Leila Aboulela tells a story of obsession with a favourite author. Also including Thom Jones, Emily Raboteau, Rawi Hage, Barry Lopez, Herta Mller, Amira Hass, and more - writers from around the world lend their voices to the theme and what it means to build, leave, return to, lose, and love a home.
Freeman’s: Family is the second literary anthology in the series reviewers are calling ‘bold’ (Minneapolis Star-Tribune) and ‘refreshing’ (Chicago Literati). Following a debut issue on the theme of ‘Arrival’, Freeman circles a new topic whose definition is constantly challenged by the best of our writers: family. The issue opens with Aminatta Forna musing on the legacy of slavery as she settles her family in Washington, DC, where she is constantly accused of cutting in line whenever she stands next to her white husband. Award-winning novelist Claire Vaye Watkins delivers a stunning portrait of a woman in the throes of postpartum depression. Helen Garner’s diary extracts offer insight into the ways we relate to one another. Booker Prize–winner Marlon James turns his attention away from distant fathers to write about his mother, who calls to sing him happy birthday every year. Even in the darkest moments, humour abounds: in Claire Messud’s home there are two four-legged tyrants; Aleksandar Hemon’s father declares war on raccoons; and Sandra Cisneros writes about her extended family of past lovers. With outstanding, never-before-published pieces of fiction, non-fiction and poetry from literary heavyweights and up-and-coming writers, Freeman's: Family collects the most amusing, heartbreaking and probing stories about family life emerging today. John Freeman is an award-winning writer and book critic who has written for numerous publications, including the New York Times Book Review, Los Angeles Times, Guardian and Wall Street Journal. He is the former editor of Granta and the author of Shrinking the World and a collection of author interviews How to Read a Novelist. He lives in New York City. ‘John Freeman is a literary bowerbird; he has an eye for treasure...[Freeman’s: Family] is less an anthology than a conversation, the sense of intimacy that sharing family stories invites in real life, captured on the page.’ Australian
A diverse anthology of poetry, fiction and essays from the most exciting writers around the world in this “fresh, provocative, engrossing” literary journal (BBC.com). The literary anthology Freeman’s, created by writer, critic, and former Granta editor John Freeman, has quickly gained an international following with wide acclaim. It has been called “bold [and] searching” by the Minneapolis Star-Tribune and “impressively diverse” by O Magazine. This issue introduces a list of more than twenty-five poets, essayists, novelists, and short story writers from around the world who are shaping contemporary literature and will continue to impact it in years to come. Drawing on recommendations from book editors, critics, translators, and authors from across the globe, Freeman’s: The Future of New Writing includes pieces from writers aged twenty-five to seventy, from almost twenty countries and writing in almost as many languages. This will be a new kind of list, and an aesthetic manifesto for our times. Against a climate of nationalism and siloed thinking, this special issue celebrates a global view of where writing is going next. “The oldest is 70. The youngest, 26. In between, the best list of this kind I have ever seen.”—Marlon James
We live today in constant motion, travelling distances rapidly, small ones daily, arriving in new states. In this inaugural edition of Freeman's, a new biannual of unpublished writing, former Granta editor and NBCC president John Freeman brings together the best new fiction, nonfiction, and poetry about that electrifying moment when we arrive. Strange encounters abound. David Mitchell meets a ghost in Hiroshima Prefecture; Lydia Davis recounts her travels in the exotic territory of the Norwegian language; and in a Dave Eggers story, an elderly gentleman cannot remember why he brought a fork to a wedding. End points often turn out to be new beginnings. Louise Erdrich visits a Native American cemetery that celebrates the next journey, and in a Haruki Murakami story, an ageing actor arrives back in his true self after performing a role, discovering he has changed, becoming a new person. Featuring startling new fiction by Laura van den Berg, Helen Simpson, and Tahmima Anam, as well as stirring essays by Aleksandar Hemon, Barry Lopez, and Garnette Cadogan, Freeman's announces the arrival of an essential map to the best new writing in the world.
Hilarious and poignant, The Gargoyle Hunters is a love letter to a vanishing city, and a deeply emotional story of fathers and sons. Intimately portraying New York’s elbow-jostling relationship with time, the novel solves the mystery of a brazen and seemingly impossible architectural heist—the theft of an entire historic Manhattan building—that stunned the city and made the front page of The New York Times in 1974. With both his family and his city fracturing, thirteen-year-old Griffin Watts is recruited into his estranged father’s illicit and dangerous architectural salvage business. Small and nimble, Griffin is charged with stealing exuberantly expressive nineteenth-century architectural sculptures—gargoyles—right off the faces of unsung tenements and iconic skyscrapers all over town. As his father explains it, these gargoyles, carved and cast by immigrant artisans during the city’s architectural glory days, are an endangered species in this era of sweeping urban renewal. Desperate both to connect with his father and to raise cash to pay the mortgage on the brownstone where he lives with his mother and sister, Griffin is slow to recognize that his father’s deepening obsession with preserving the architectural treasures of Beaux Arts New York is also a destructive force, imperiling Griffin’s friendships, his relationship with his very first girlfriend, and even his life. As his father grows increasingly possessive of both Griffin’s mother and his scavenged touchstones of the lost city, Griffin must learn how to build himself into the person he wants to become and discover which parts of his life can be salvaged—and which parts must be let go. Maybe loss, he reflects, is the only thing no one can ever take away from you. Tender, funny, and achingly sad, The Gargoyle Hunters introduces an extraordinary new novelist.
Some of the women are well known, others were prominent in their time but have since faded into obscurity, and a few have never received the attention they deserve."--BOOK JACKET.

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