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Frog Under A Coconut Shell means in Malay, “Katuk Bawah Tempurong”, an idiom which likens someone to a frog that lives under a coconut shell, who believes the shell to be its entire world. It is a reference to the author’s own mother, who although herself uneducated and living in a parochial existence in a small kampong (attap village), believed in and struggled for a greater vision—the right to educate her daughter. The author beautifully evokes the experience of living with her family in rural Potong Pasir of the 1950s and 60s, and paints in heartwarming detail, her mother’s life journey from the bloom of her youth to her present affliction with Alzheimer’s disease. In part a nostalgic memoir of Old Singapore, Frog Under A Coconut Shell, is also, most wholeheartedly, a testament to the love and courage of a mother that changed the life of her daughter forever.
This book is based on the true story of the author, of how her own mother struggled for her right to educate her daughters despite her own parochial experience in a small kampong. This highly nostalgic and evocative book pays tribute to her mother's courageous journey from the bloom of youth to her affliction with Alzheimer's disease in old age.
Cekidot, gan!—"Check it out Boss!" Kamu Dodol—"You're a coconut fudge!" (You're slow on the uptake) This book is an informal compendium of Indonesian expressions, including proverbs, slang, quotations and acronyms. The unique aspects of the Indonesian language offer one of the best windows into Indonesian culture. Slang, titles, proverbs, nicknames, acronyms, quotations and other expressions reveal its character, in the words of its people and are a great way to learn Indonesian culture. This book of expressions looks at Indonesia with the help of its national language, bahasa Indonesia. It describes Indonesians and their fears, beliefs, history and politics, as well as how they live, fight, grieve and laugh. Indonesian is a variant of Malay, the national language of Malaysia, and many of its expressions come from the Malay heartland of Sumatra island. Indonesian has also incorporated terms from Javanese, the language of the dominant ethnic group in a huge nation of more than 17,000 islands. Although Indonesian is officially a young language, it contains words from Sanskrit, Arabic, Chinese, Dutch, Portuguese and English, a legacy of the merchants, warriors, laborers and holy men who traveled to the archipelago over the centuries. The Indonesian language was a nationalist symbol during the campaign against Dutch rule in the 20th century. Indonesians who fought against colonialism made it the national language in their constitution when they declared independence in 1945. Two generations later, modern Indonesians love word play. The tongue slips and skids, chopping words, piling on syllables and flipping them. Indonesians turn phrases into acronyms, and construct double meanings. Their inventions reflect social trends, mock authority, or get a point across in a hurry. This book divides Indonesian expressions into categories such as food and wisdom, politics and personalities. The format is the same in each chapter. An expression in Indonesian, or sometimes a regional language in Indonesia, is followed by a translation, an interpretation of the meaning, and usually a summary of the idiom's origin or background. Some translations are more literal than others, reflecting an effort to balance clarity of meaning with the flavor of the original words.
Indonesian Idioms and Expressions is a collection of Indonesian expressions, including proverbs, slang, quotations and acronyms, that offers a commentary on their origins, as well as insights into Indonesian culture, customs, and history. The book is an informal compendium designed to be both educational and easy to read. There are four parts in the book, and the chapters hit on various linguistic themes, among them wisdom, characters, animals, food, slang, family affairs, and politics. Entries include the expression in Bahasa Indonesia, a translation, an equivalent expression in English, and an explanation if necessary. The idea is to learn about Indonesian through the texture and content of its language, rather than the headlines—often bad ones—that tend to dominate perceptions of the vast country.
This publication is the result of a WIPO study on the effective use of intellectual property in ASEAN countries. The project was implemented by the WIPO Japan Office (WJO), with funding provided from the Japan Patent Office under the auspices of the Japan Funds-In-Trust.
The most significant aspect of living in a kampong was its kampong spirit—or gotong royong. Though deprived of modern comforts like electricity or running water, multi-racial neighbours lived harmoniously with each other in their attap villages, had a wonderful zest for life and a strong sense of community. Kampong Spirit brings to life the colourful characters of the villagers with whom the Peranakan author, Josephine Chia, grew up at a kampong in Potong Pasir. The period 1955 to 1965 was also a dramatic era for Singapore. As the country struggled towards nationhood, the social and political events of this time and their effects are seen through the eyes of the common folk. This collection of delightful, real life short stories will take you through Singapore’s history and heritage at a human level. For some, it will be a journey of discovery and for others it will be a time of reminiscing for those nostalgic years.
Three people travel to Bali for very different reasons. Marla is well read in Bali’s culture; she distrusts false ideologies, orientalism and tourism. To her surprise she finds the echoes of a golden age and a passionate lover. Nelson, a young woman from Sydney returns in the hope of reuniting with her Balinese boyfriend, but encounters the unexpected. Tyler, a New Yorker searching for a lost friend, enters a world of mystery and intrigue. All three are on the edge, unsure of whether they should stay in Bali any longer, but are increasingly drawn into the heart of this complex and alluring island. Through subtle storytelling and compelling characters, Inez Baranay unravels the exotic, ways of knowing and the culture of tourism, in one of the world’s favourite destinations.

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