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From the Cypriot fourth division to the Indian national team, Stephen Constantine�e(tm)s career has taken the scenic route. Ever since leaving his home in Cyprus with nothing at the age of 16, Constantine has been used to life on the road; his sense of adventure dwarfed only by his appetite to improve and develop those he works with.That yearning for fresh experience has inevitably led Constantine into a host of unique situations. He has hugged a pitch- invading prince in Kathmandu. He has been threatened with kidnap in Khartoum. He has seen the Millwall chairman tip £10,000 onto the changing room floor, and he has watched his goalkeeping coach attack a pitch invader in Congo. Many in the game allege to have seen it all, but there is no one with a better claim to such a statement than Constantine, a veteran manager of six different national sides across four continents.But �e~From Delhi to the Den�e(tm) isn�e(tm)t simply a tale of one man planning his next coaching expedition in another far-flung corner of the world. Constantine explores the pressures of paying the mortgage when most jobs don�e(tm)t last 12 months, and the solitude of life on the road when your wife and children still reside thousands of miles away.We hear of how qualifications are trumped by reputations, and why dealing with Football Associations isn�e(tm)t exactly plain- sailing, especially with governmental interference.Constantine�e(tm)s journey �e" for the time being, anyway �e" ends up India, where he is looking to stir the passions and enhance the professionalism of Asia�e(tm)s sleeping giant. Progress has already been achieved, but nothing is finished yet.Anyone interested in football, travel, or adventure will love this book.
Delhi claims a noble history as the site of at least seven capitals dating from before the time of Alexander the Great. The glorious Mogul Empire brought great riches to the city and to Agra, where the world-famous Taj Mahal has excited awe in visitors for over 380 years. This Traveller's Reader is an indispensable and fascinating companion for the traveller who wants to understand the history of both cities, and who seeks the true spirit of the places. Delhi & Agra is a topographical anthology that explores the cities' sites of interest and recreates the key events, customs and lives of the past, drawing on diaries, letters, memoirs and commentaries written by residents and visitors over the course of 600 years. Extracts include Tamerlane's account of the sack of Delhi in 1398; descriptions of Shah Jahan building the Taj Mahal; recollections of Jesuits and mullahs debating the relative merits of their religions before the great Mogul emperor, Akbar; reports of cruelty and creativity, of addiction to drink and drugs; descriptions of elephant fights, suttee, the life of the bazaar and vice-regal banquets; and eyewitness accounts of the Indian Mutiny from both sides, and of the bloody aftermath of Partition. A great variety of topics are covered, vividly conveying an impression of how it would have been to live in, or visit, both cities from the recent past to hundreds of years ago.
Guidebook on India.
Studies In Fiction Deals With George Orwell, John Steinbeck, Thomas Love Peacock, Anita Desai, Jerome David Salinger, Thomas Hardy, Charles Dickens, Mrs. Elizabeth Gaskell, Anthony Trollope, W.M. Thackeray, George Eliot, Walker Percy And George Meredith In Addition To A Number Of Other Novelists. The Chapters Based On These Novelists Thoroughly And Conclusively Analyse And Summarise Only Those Aspects Which Form The Central Part Of The Modern Criticism. Novels Chosen For Discussion, Too, Are Those Which Usually Have A Scholarly Tradition Of Criticism. The Early As Well As The Late Victorian Fiction Has Been Re-Interpreted In The Light Of Uniformitarianism, Naturalism Newtorism And Darwinism.
For countless generations families have lived in isolated communities in the Godavari Delta of coastal Andhra Pradesh, learning and reciting their legacy of Vedas, performing daily offerings and occasional sacrifices. They are the virtually unrecognized survivors of a 3,700-year-old heritage, the last in India who perform the ancient animal and soma sacrifices according to Vedic tradition. In Vedic Voices, David M. Knipe offers for the first time, an opportunity for them to speak about their lives, ancestral lineages, personal choices as pandits, wives, children, and ways of coping with an avalanche of changes in modern India. He presents a study of four generations of ten families, from those born at the outset of the twentieth century down to their great-grandsons who are just beginning, at the age of seven, the task of memorizing their Veda, the Taittiriya Samhita, a feat that will require eight to twelve years of daily recitations. After successful examinations these young men will reside with the Veda family girls they married as children years before, take their places in the oral transmission of a three-thousand-year Vedic heritage, teach the Taittiriya collection of texts to their own sons, and undertake with their wives the major and minor sacrifices performed by their ancestors for some three millennia. Coastal Andhra, famed for bountiful rice and coconut plantations, has received scant attention from historians of religion and anthropologists despite a wealth of cultural traditions. Vedic Voices describes in captivating prose the geography, cultural history, pilgrimage traditions, and celebrated persons of the region. Here unfolds a remarkable story of Vedic pandits and their wives, one scarcely known in India and not at all to the outside world.

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