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Proposes a way to abolish the entire institution of war and to gradually establish world government.
This book contains some 600 entries on a range of topics from ancient Chinese warfare to late 20th-century intervention operations. Designed for a wide variety of users, it encompasses general reviews of aspects of military organization and science, as well as specific wars and conflicts. The book examines naval and air warfare, as well as significant individuals, including commanders, theorists, and war leaders. Each entry includes a listing of additional publications on the topic, accompanied by an article discussing these publications with reference to their particular emphases, strengths, and limitations.
In The Triumph of Improvisation, James Graham Wilson takes a long view of the end of the Cold War, from the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan in December 1979 to Operation Desert Storm in January 1991. Drawing on deep archival research and recently declassified papers, Wilson argues that adaptation, improvisation, and engagement by individuals in positions of power ended the specter of a nuclear holocaust. Amid ambivalence and uncertainty, Mikhail Gorbachev, Ronald Reagan, George Shultz, George H. W. Bush, and a host of other actors engaged with adversaries and adapted to a rapidly changing international environment and information age in which global capitalism recovered as command economies failed. Eschewing the notion of a coherent grand strategy to end the Cold War, Wilson paints a vivid portrait of how leaders made choices; some made poor choices while others reacted prudently, imaginatively, and courageously to events they did not foresee. A book about the burdens of responsibility, the obstacles of domestic politics, and the human qualities of leadership, The Triumph of Improvisation concludes with a chapter describing how George H. W. Bush oversaw the construction of a new configuration of power after the fall of the Berlin Wall, one that resolved the fundamental components of the Cold War on Washington's terms.
Historians have long understood that the notion of "the cold war" is richly metaphorical, if not paradoxical. The conflict between the United States and the Soviet Union was a war that fell ambiguously short of war, an armed truce that produced considerable bloodshed. Yet scholars in the rapidly expanding field of Cold War studies have seldom paused to consider the conceptual and chronological foundations of the idea of the Cold War itself. In Uncertain Empire, a group of leading scholars takes up the challenge of making sense of the idea of the Cold War and its application to the writing of American history. They interrogate the concept from a wide range of disciplinary vantage points--diplomatic history, the history of science, literary criticism, cultural history, and the history of religion--highlighting the diversity of methods and approaches in contemporary Cold War studies. Animating the volume as a whole is a question about the extent to which the Cold War was an American invention. Uncertain Empire brings debates over national, global, and transnational history into focus and offers students of the Cold War a new framework for considering recent developments in the field.
Here, from a brilliant young writer, is a paradigm-shifting history of both a utopian concept and global movement—the idea of the Third World. The Darker Nations traces the intellectual origins and the political history of the twentieth century attempt to knit together the world’s impoverished countries in opposition to the United States and Soviet spheres of influence in the decades following World War II. Spanning every continent of the global South, Vijay Prashad’s fascinating narrative takes us from the birth of postcolonial nations after World War II to the downfall and corruption of nationalist regimes. A breakthrough book of cutting-edge scholarship, it includes vivid portraits of Third World giants like India’s Nehru, Egypt’s Nasser, and Indonesia’s Sukarno—as well as scores of extraordinary but now-forgotten intellectuals, artists, and freedom fighters. The Darker Nations restores to memory the vibrant though flawed idea of the Third World, whose demise, Prashad ultimately argues, has produced a much impoverished international political arena.
The major purpose of this book is to examine Christian Realism as articulated by Reinhold Niebuhr and to see whether his theory can shed any light on world politics especially in a nuclear age. Major themes of Niebuhr's theory included in this book are: Niebuhr's understanding of human nature, critique of idealism and naturalism and the dialecticalexistential framework. Niebuhr's thoughts on love, justice, power, society, community and responsibility, as well as his thought on world politics are discussed. This book also covers Niebuhr's understanding of national interests, balance of power, imperialism, democracy and the developing countries. Niebuhr's Just War theory is compared with many other major thinkers on the subject. Niebuhr's Just War theory in a nuclear and terror age was examined with particular interest. Topics include: Terror, Counter-Terror and the Just War theory, Jihad, Nuclear Terrorism, Pre-emptive strike against nuclear facilities and the Just War theory. Niebuhr's approaches to peace in a nuclear and terror age are also discussed. One of the major challenges to U.S. foreign policy today is North Korea's nuclear proliferation. This book attempts to provide a theoretical guideline for U.S. policy vis-a-vis North Korea's nuke. John Hoyoung Lee is the former professor of church history at Westminster Theological Seminary in Philadelphia and emeritus professor of economics and political science at the Rochester Institute of Technology. Dr. Lee was also the senior pastor of the Bethel Korean Presbyterian Church in Ellicott City, MD.

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