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Get out your cocktail shaker and re-live the speakeasy experience with this collection of authentic cocktails. Gatsby Cocktails features more than 20 classic cocktails inspired by the 1920s. Try re-creating the classic Sidecar, comprising brandy, lemon juice, and Cointreau. Or discover the secret to Jay Gatsby’s tipple of choice; the cooling Mint Julep. Perfect the classic martini or try a tempting Raspberry Rickey from the sparkling selection of recipes. With more than 20 classic recipes, this collection captures the iconic elegance of the Prohibition era.
The Great Gatsby, by the American author F. Scott Fitzgerald, is one of the great novels of twentieth-century literature. Set in the Long Island of 1922, it provides a critical social history of America during the “Roaring Twenties”, an era that Fitzgerald himself dubbed the “Jazz Age”, known for unprecedented economic prosperity, the evolution of jazz music, flapper culture, and bootlegging and other criminal activity. A historic period when “gin was the national drink and sex the national obsession”, as classified by The New York Times.
The perfect pairing for anyone with a literary thirst! From Jane Austen's little-known fondness for wine to Hemingway's beloved mojitos, literature and libations go hand in hand. Cocktails for Book Lovers blends these in a delectable book that will delight both readers and cocktail enthusiasts alike. This irresistible collection features 50 original and classic cocktail recipes based on works of famous authors and popular drinks of their eras, including Orange Champagne Punch, Salted Caramel and Bourbon Milkshakes, and even Zombie Cola. So dip in, pick your favorite author or book, and take a sip—or start at the beginning and work your way through. Cheers! Cocktails inspired by your favorite authors: • Charlotte Bronte • Dani Shapiro • Dorothy Parker • Ernest Hemingway • F. Scott Fitzgerald • Flannery O'Connor • Jhumpa Lahiri • Junot Diaz • Virginia Woolf • Wally Lamb • And 40 more!
Presents a series of critical essays discussing the structure, themes, and subject matter of Fitzgerald's story of the love between wealthy Jay Gatsby and the beautiful Daisy Buchanan.
This intriguing study examines the truth behind the myths and misconceptions that defined the Roaring Twenties, as portrayed through the popular literary works of the time. • Outlines key events and developments and provides context for the historical period and work • Aligns with Common Core standards in English language arts and social studies • Discusses five major writers of the Jazz Age • Provides numerous suggestions for class activities and further individual exploration • Supplies educators with ready reference work that aligns with Common Core Standards in English Language Arts (ELA) in Social Studies • Gives readers insight into how literature and other art forms reflect the social conditions and are inspired by events of the time
If you can’t get enough of The Great Gatsby, then this is one book you will not want to miss. This companion is a bundle of several of BookCaps™ bestselling books. It includes a short biography of F. Scott Fitzgerald, a look into the marriage of F. Scott and Zelda, a study guide to the novel, and teacher lesson plans. BookCap Study Guides do not contain text from the actual book, and are not meant to be purchased as alternatives to reading the book. This study guide is an unofficial companion and not endorsed by the author or publisher of the book.
The authentic edition from Fitzgerald’s original publisher. The Great Gatsby, F. Scott Fitzgerald’s third book, stands as the supreme achievement of his career. This exemplary novel of the Jazz Age has been acclaimed by generations of readers. The story of the fabulously wealthy Jay Gatsby and his love for the beautiful Daisy Buchanan, of lavish parties on Long Island at a time when The New York Times noted “gin was the national drink and sex the national obsession,” it is an exquisitely crafted tale of America in the 1920s. The Great Gatsby is one of the great classics of twentieth-century literature.
These vocabulary activities for The Great Gatsby incorporate key skills from the Common Core. The activities integrate vocabulary with a study of the text. Includes text-dependent questions, definitions, and text-based sentences.
Published to coincide with the film release of ‘The Great Gatsby’, Collins Classics brings you F. Scott Fitzgerald’s three best-known works in one collection.
The Great Gatsby is regarded as the most widely taught and read American literary classic. This volume is intended to help readers fully enjoy and understand this work that continues to become part of the equipment of educated people. Also provides information on the author's intentions in writing this work and the knowledge, values, standards and biases of the public at the time of its initial publication.
Traditional critics of film adaptation generally assumed a) that the written text is better than the film adaptation because the plot is more intricate and the language richer when pictorial images do not intrude; b) that films are better when particularly faithful to the original; c) that authors do not make good script writers and should not sully their imagination by writing film scripts; d) and often that American films lack the complexity of authored texts because they are sourced out of Hollywood. The 'faithfulness' view has by and large disappeared, and intertextuality is now a generally received notion, but the field still lacks studies with a postmodern methodology and lens.Exploring Hollywood feature films as well as small studio productions, Adaptation Theory and Criticism explores the intertextuality of a dozen films through a series of case studies introduced through discussions of postmodern methodology and practice. Providing the reader with informative background on theories of film adaptation as well as carefully articulated postmodern methodology and issues, Gordon Slethaug includes several case studies of major Hollywood productions and small studio films, some of which have been discussed before (Age of Innocence, Gangs of New York, and Do the Right Thing) and some that have received lesser consideration (Six Degrees of Separation, Smoke, Smoke Signals, Broken Flowers, and various Snow White narratives including Enchanted, Mirror Mirror, and Snow White and the Huntsman). Useful for both film and literary studies students, Adaptation Theory and Criticism cogently combines the existing scholarship and uses previous theories to engage readers to think about the current state of American literature and film.
Looks at the response of American writers to Prohibition with an analysis of fictional portrayals of bootleggers, moonshiners, cabarets, speakeasies, and Prohibition-era characters.
Critical essays on American literature.
“An absorbing popular history of one of history’s most popular drinks” (Booklist). Gin has been a drink of kings infused with crushed pearls and rose petals, and a drink of the poor flavored with turpentine and sulfuric acid. Born in alchemists’ stills and monastery kitchens, its earliest incarnations were juniper flavored medicines used to prevent plague, ease the pains of childbirth, even to treat a lack of courage. In The Book of Gin, Richard Barnett traces the life of this beguiling spirit, once believed to cause a “new kind of drunkenness.” In the eighteenth century, gin-crazed debauchery (and class conflict) inspired Hogarth’s satirical masterpieces “Gin Lane” and “Beer Street.” In the nineteenth century, gin was drunk by Napoleonic War naval heroes, at lavish gin palaces, and by homesick colonials, who mixed it with their bitter anti-malarial tonics. In the early twentieth century, the illicit cocktail culture of Prohibition made gin—often dangerous bathtub gin—fashionable again. And today, with the growth of small-batch distilling, gin has once-again made a comeback. Wide-ranging, impeccably researched, and packed with illuminating stories, The Book of Gin is lively and fascinating, an indispensable history of a complex and notorious drink. “The Book of Gin is full of history that will make you grin . . . An enchanting read.” —Cooking by the Book

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