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Ruskin Bond's readers range from nine to ninety. And if there are such things as ghosts there are probably a few who are reading him in the spirit world. In these stories Ruskin Bond presents a picture of a `haunted India' as witnessed and described by British writers, officials and travellers during the pre-independence era. Ruskin Bond, resident of Mussoorie, is a well-known writer of fiction and a raconteur par excellence. His Tales and Legends from India, Angry River, Strange Men, Strange Places, The Blue Umbrella, A Long Walk for Bina and Hanuman to the Rescue are also available in Rupa paperback. The Ruskin Bond's Children's Omnibus has been a firm favourite with young readers for several years. Ghost Stories from the Raj, The Rupa Book of Great Animal Stories, The Rupa Book of True Tales of Mystery and Adventure, The Rupa Book of Himalayan Tales and The Rupa Book of Great Suspense Stories are some of his recent books for Rupa.
When Major Raj Pratap Singh reaches his post, which is at one of the extreme northern borders, he is shocked to find out that the village at the base of the military camp has been abandoned due to haunting by ghosts! He tries to discover the reasons but is rebuffed by the scared villagers who swear that they had seen ghosts! Raj himself has a sighting! Here Raj is thrust into one of the most intriguing mysteries that becomes a mammoth challenge! His commando training and alert wits are required to expose one of the slyest of misdoings going on in those regions!
This book delves into the mystic world of the Tangkhul Naga where the line between the real and spirit worlds are blurred. Drawn from the deep oral storytelling tradition, the author successfully takes the readers to a place where the present and past exist together side by side – where supernatural is a part of everyday life. The book captures a very important essence of the Tangkhul Naga and their beliefs and is a welcomed addition to the growing depository of English writing from the North East India. Jim Wungramyao Kasom Author of Homecoming and Other Stories.
1.Life’s Secret 2.Phakir Chand 3.The Indigent Brahman 4.The Story of the Rakshasas 5.The Story of Swet-Basanta9 6.The Evil Eye of Sani 7.The Boy whom Seven Mothers suckled 8.The Story of Prince Sobur 9.The Origin of Opium 10.Strike but Hear 11.The Adventures of Two Thieves and of their Sons2 12.The Ghost-Brahman 13.The Man who wished to be Perfect 14.A Ghostly Wife 15.The Story of a Brahmadaitya 16.The Story of a Hiraman 17.The Origin of Rubies 18.The Match-making Jackal 19.The Boy with the Moon on his Forehead 20.The Ghost who was Afraid of being Bagged 21.The Field of Bones 22.The Bald Wife
Established in the 1840s by the peripatetic British, dak bungalows forever changed the way officers of the Empire and their families travelled across the subcontinent and got to know the real India. With most of the British Raj perpetually on the move, whether on tour or during the summer migration to the hills, dak bungalow travel inspired a brotherhood of sorts for generations of British and Indian officers, who could recount tales of horrid dak bungalow food, a crazed khansama, and the time their only companion at the bungalow was a tiger on the loose. Today, too, PWD-run circuit houses and dak bungalows continue to occupy an important place in the lives and imagination of India?s civil servants. In The Raj on the Move: Story of the Dak Bungalow, Rajika Bhandari weaves together history, architecture, and travel to take us on a fascinating journey of India?s British-era dak bungalows and circuit houses, following, quite literally, in the footsteps of travellers who stayed in these bungalows over the past two centuries. Her search takes her from the early-19th century memoirs and travelogues of British memsahibs, to travelling from the original colonial outpost of Madras in the south to the deep interiors of Madhya Pradesh, the heart of British India. Evoking the stories of Rudyard Kipling and Ruskin Bond, and filled with fascinating tidbits and amusing anecdotes, the book unearths local folklore about these remote and mysterious buildings, from the crotchety khansamas and their delectable chicken dishes to the resident ghosts that still walk the halls at night.
Ruskin Bond, resident of Mussoorie, is a well-known writer of fiction and a raconteur par excellence. His Tales and Legends from India, Angry River, Strange Men, Strange Places, The Blue Umbrella, A Long Walk for Bina and Hanuman to the Rescue are also available in Rupa paperback. The Ruskin Bond's Children's Omnibus has been a firm favourite with young readers for several years. Ghost Stories from the Raj, The Rupa Book of Great Animal Stories, The Rupa Book of True Tales of Mystery and Adventure, The Rupa Book of Himalayan Tales and The Rupa Book of Great Suspense Stories are some of his recent books for Rupa.
For two hundred years India was the jewel in the British imperial crown. During the course of governing India – the Raj – a number of words came to have particular meanings in the imperial lexicon. This book documents the words and terms that the British used to describe, define, understand and judge the subcontinent. It offers insight into the cultures of the Raj through a sampling of its various terms, concepts and nomenclature, and utilizes critical commentaries on specific domains to illuminate not only the linguistic meaning of a word but its cultural and political nuances. This fascinating book also provides literary and cultural texts from the colonial canon where these Anglo-Indian colloquialisms, terms and official jargon occurred. It enables us to glean a sense of the Empire’s linguistic and cultural tensions, negotiations and adaptations. The work will interest students and researchers of history, language and literature, colonialism, cultural studies, imperialism and the British Raj, and South Asian studies.
The ghost story 1840-1920: A cultural history examines the British ghost story within the political contexts of the long nineteenth century. By relating the ghost story to economic, national, colonial and gendered contexts' it provides a critical re-evaluation of the period. The conjuring of a political discourse of spectrality during the nineteenth century enables a culturally sensitive reconsideration of the work of writers including Dickens, Collins, Charlotte Riddell, Vernon Lee, May Sinclair, Kipling, Le Fanu, Henry James and M.R. James. Additionally, a chapter on the interpretation of spirit messages reveals how issues relating to textual analysis were implicated within a language of the spectral. This book is the first full-length study of the British ghost story in over 30 years and it will be of interest to academics, graduate students and advanced undergraduates working on the Gothic, literary studies, historical studies, critical theory and cultural studies.
The Handbook to the Ghost Story sets out to survey and significantly extend a new field of criticism which has been taking shape over recent years, centring on the ghost story and bringing together a vast range of interpretive methods and theoretical perspectives. The main task of the volume is to properly situate the genre within historical and contemporary literary cultures across the globe, and to explore its significance within wider literary contexts as well as those of the supernatural. The Handbook offers the most significant contribution to this new critical field to date, assembling some of its leading scholars to examine the key contexts and issues required for understanding the emergence and development of the ghost story.
I was fortunate to have spent my childhood in pre-1947 India, immersed in a leisurely and privileged culture at a time when people did not rely on television and radio for entertainment but enjoyed the company of friends and family for conversation and social interaction. We had a large extended family, going back many generations in India and, as was the custom, we entertained frequently and often had family and friends as house guests to stay. There was much re-telling of old and loved family tales, and new stories were welcome additions to the existing story pool. Gossip, chatter, current affairs debates, ghost stories, songs and parlourgames were our means of passing the time in an enjoyable way. This book is written in affectionate memory of the Raj of my childhood, which was the only real "homeland" my family had ever known, and of the Indian people who were our work colleagues, neighbours, friends and in some cases relatives.
The popularity of Ghost Stories from the Raj resulted in a number of requests for more this period. Ruskin Bond delved into his archives and came up with another entertaining collection of strange or ‘nightmarish’ tales written by Englishmen who came to India and the East Indies in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Her are spooks, werewolves, dacoits, assassins, man-eating tigers, and head-hunters! And in his Introduction Ruskin Bond tells us why those “mad dogs and Englishmen” went out in the mid-day sun and what happened to some of them! Never a dull moment – and never a dull sentence in this, the eleventh of Rupa’s fast-selling anthologies.
The popularity of Ghost Stories from the Raj resulted in a number of requests for more this period. Ruskin Bond delved into his archives and came up with another entertaining collection of strange or ‘nightmarish’ tales written by Englishmen who came to India and the East Indies in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Her are spooks, werewolves, dacoits, assassins, man-eating tigers, and head-hunters! And in his Introduction Ruskin Bond tells us why those “mad dogs and Englishmen” went out in the mid-day sun and what happened to some of them! Never a dull moment – and never a dull sentence in this, the eleventh of Rupa’s fast-selling anthologies.
Short stories by various authors.
Originally published in 1901, 'East of Suez' was Alice Perrin's first collection of short stories. Her fascinating and thought-provoking tales of Anglo-Indian life rival the best work of Kipling, and were hugely successful in their day. Perrin tells stories of illicit love against a beautifully-drawn backdrop of the mystical east, interweaving the supernatural with exquisite details of her characters' lives. This scholarly edition includes: a critical introduction; author biography; suggestions for further reading; explanatory notes; contextual material on representations of the British Raj; illustrations from 'The Illustrated London News' and 'The Windsor Magazine'.
She was getting closer. His mouth ran dry and his scream died deep inside him. His wobbly legs refused to move. . .The fear of the unknown, enhanced by the mist, darkness and pattering raindrops is part of life in the hills. But there have been real encounters with the supernatural, and included in this collection of chilling tales are personal experiences of people. Read on for some spine-chilling adventures with the spirits in Shimla.
An unforgettable historical novella that leads you to the flowing sand dunes of Rajasthan, the clash of swords, to the courtyard of kings and queens. The book captures the spirit of a heroic past that never fails to move readers even today.
Mulk Raj Anand, 1905-2004, Indo-English novelist.
It is 1888. As Central Asia reels under the intrigues of the Great Game, Sherlock Holmes and Dr Watson sail to India on a secret mission in the service of Empire. The accountant of a Hindu monastery has been brutally murdered, and the head priest is the prime suspect. But as both detective and doctor soon discover, their Indian autumn has only just begun. They are plunged into a series of adventures that take them from Madras and Pondicherry to the princely courts of Hyderabad, the uncharted jungles of the Central Provinces, pine-scented Nainital, and the bustling metropolis of Calcutta. Even as Holmes unravels sinister plots, Watson busies himself helping Ronald Ross track the malaria parasite and advising a schoolboy called Dhyan Chand on the finer points of hockey. The six stories in Holmes of the Raj are delightful vignettes of life and politics in colonial India. Vithal Rajan breathes life into historical characters, as Holmes and Watson meet Lord Ripon, Madame Blavatsky, Francis Younghusband, Kipling and Kim himself, Vivekananda, Aurobindo, Ramanujan, Motilal Nehru, Tagore, Jinnah, and many, many others. Sprightly, colourful, and remarkably faithful to Conan Doyle, this is an unforgettable collection.

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