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Told through the eyes of a longtime Montana fishing guide and itinerant fishing bum, A Good Life Wasted offers a unique perspective on an implausible period in the recent history of human civilization. When Dave Ames started guiding, Rocky Mountain locals rode horses and dug camas roots; now they’re trading stock options on cell phones. The collision of stone and computer ages was short-lived, but the deep-rooted themes of this book remain. A Good Life Wasted--a chronicle and celebration of the fishing-guide life--is poignant and spiritual; it’s Blackfoot Indians and copper miners’ daughters; it’s fiddles and guitars and the fabric of space; it’s about what happens to wild people when the wilderness is gone. From the first chapter--in which Dave Ames recalls bluffing his way into a job as a fishing guide to the rich and famous (after barely managing to suppress the overwhelming urge to go postal at the federal agency where he suffered his first, and only, “real” job in a cubicle farm)--we’re hooked. We gladly follow Ames as he describes the rite of tasting clouds of mating midges to better match the hatch, tells the story of a fabled Blackfoot fishing guide, and shares his further adventures as a guy with no job, no office, and no stress. A Good Life Wasted spins a fascinating, compelling web--a web that entices the deskbound salary slave to make a break for it, and head west to big sky and fast, cold water, ASAP.
One of the great fears many of us face is that despite all our effort and striving, we will discover at the end that we have wasted our life. In A Guide to the Good Life, William B. Irvine plumbs the wisdom of Stoic philosophy, one of the most popular and successful schools of thought in ancient Rome, and shows how its insight and advice are still remarkably applicable to modern lives. In A Guide to the Good Life, Irvine offers a refreshing presentation of Stoicism, showing how this ancient philosophy can still direct us toward a better life. Using the psychological insights and the practical techniques of the Stoics, Irvine offers a roadmap for anyone seeking to avoid the feelings of chronic dissatisfaction that plague so many of us. Irvine looks at various Stoic techniques for attaining tranquility and shows how to put these techniques to work in our own life. As he does so, he describes his own experiences practicing Stoicism and offers valuable first-hand advice for anyone wishing to live better by following in the footsteps of these ancient philosophers. Readers learn how to minimize worry, how to let go of the past and focus our efforts on the things we can control, and how to deal with insults, grief, old age, and the distracting temptations of fame and fortune. We learn from Marcus Aurelius the importance of prizing only things of true value, and from Epictetus we learn how to be more content with what we have. Finally, A Guide to the Good Life shows readers how to become thoughtful observers of their own lives. If we watch ourselves as we go about our daily business and later reflect on what we saw, we can better identify the sources of distress and eventually avoid that pain in our life. By doing this, the Stoics thought, we can hope to attain a truly joyful life.
A bestselling author teaches life-changing biblical principles of generosity and tells stories of people who have put those radical principles into practice. Each story is a practical application that can help stimulate imagination and expand dreams of serving Jesus in fresh ways.
Seriously . . . another book that tells you how to live a good life? Don't we have enough of those? You'd think so. Yet, more people than ever are walking through life disconnected, disengaged, dissatisfied, mired in regret, declining health, and a near maniacal state of gut-wrenching autopilot busyness. Whatever is out there isn't getting through. We don't know who to trust. We don't know what's real and what's fantasy. We don't know how and where to begin and we don't want to wade through another minute of advice that gives us hope, then saps our time and leaves us empty. How to Live a Good Life is your antidote; a practical and provocative modern-day manual for the pursuit of a life well lived. No need for blind faith or surrender of intelligence; everything you'll discover is immediately actionable and subject to validation through your own experience. Drawn from the intersection of science, spirituality, and the author's years-long quest to learn at the feet of masters from nearly every tradition and walk of life, this book offers a simple yet powerful model, the "Good Life Buckets " --spend 30 days filling your buckets and reclaiming your life. Each day will bring a new, practical yet powerful idea, along with a specific exploration designed to rekindle deep, loving, and compassionate relationships; cultivate vitality, radiance, and graceful ease; and leave you feeling lit up by the way you contribute to the world, like you're doing the work you were put on the planet to do. How to Live a Good Life is not just a book to be read; it's a path to possibility, to be walked, then lived.
Once celebrated as a model development for its progressive social indicators, the southern Indian state of Kerala has earned the new distinction as the nation’s suicide capital, with suicide rates soaring to triple the national average since 1990. Rather than an aberration on the path to development and modernity, Keralites understand this crisis to be the bitter fruit borne of these historical struggles and the aspirational dilemmas they have produced in everyday life. Suicide, therefore, offers a powerful lens onto the experiential and affective dimensions of development and global change in the postcolonial world. In the long shadow of fear and uncertainty that suicide casts in Kerala, living acquires new meaning and contours. In this powerful ethnography, Jocelyn Chua draws on years of fieldwork to broaden the field of vision beyond suicide as the termination of life, considering how suicide generates new ways of living in these anxious times.
Draws on the wisdom and teachings of the ancient Greek philosopher to help readers plan for a more useful, moral, and meaningful life, addressing such profound questions as "How do I find meaning and satisfaction?" and "What are my responsibilities to my community?" 40,000 first printing.
The good life. In its simplest form, it is what you wish for those you love and care about, as well as for yourself. But what is it? What's the prescription? The truth of the matter is that no doctor can prescribe a pill that will make every heart content. But through the words of extraordinary men and women who have achieved a level of greatness, we can glean insights into passion, dedication, and wisdom. So, for today's astute students of the good life, you hold in your hands an admit-one ticket?a timeless collection of inspiration and wisdom. What you go on to do with it is up to you. "A man who views the world the same at fifty as he did at twenty has wasted thirty years of his life." ?Muhammad Ali "It's easy to make a buck. It's a lot tougher to make a difference." ?Tom Brokaw "Look, I don't want to wax philosophic, but I will say that if you're alive you've got to flap your arms and legs, you've got to jump around a lot, for life is the very opposite of death, and therefore you must at very least think noisy and colorfully, or you're not alive." ?Mel Brooks "Anytime you see a turtle up on top of a fence post, you know he had some help." ?Alex Haley "College is something you complete. Life is something you experience. So don't worry about your grade, or the results or success. Success is defined in myriad ways, and you will find it, and people will no longr be grading you, but it will come from your own internal sense of decency." ?Jon Stewart "When the heart is right, the mind and the body will follow. ?Coretta Scott King "My heroes are the ones who survived doing it wrong, who made mistakes, but recovered from them. ?Bono
Exploring how the past influences the present, the author discusses how to understand each individual's unique coping style and how to tap into the extraordinary quality of human spirit that will create the transition from victim to victor.

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