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This new edition of Handbook of Mentalizing in Mental Health Practice reflects a vibrant field undergoing development along a number of dimensions important for mental health. As evidenced by the number of experts contributing chapters that focus on specialized approaches to mentalization-based treatment (MBT), the range of mental disorders for which this therapy has proved helpful has substantially increased, and now includes psychosis. Second, the range of contexts within which the approach has been shown to be of value has grown. MBT has been found to be useful in outpatient and community settings, and, more broadly, with children, adolescents, couples, and families, and the social contexts where they are found, such as in schools and even prisons. Finally, the framework has been shown to be generalizable to an understanding of the social context of mental health. The model advanced in this book goes beyond an understanding of the development of mentalizing and aims to provide an understanding of its role in a range of social processes.Key concepts, themes, and approaches clearly articulated throughout the book include the following: Mentalizing is a transdiagnostic concept applicable to a range of mental health conditions, including trauma, personality disorders, eating disorders, depression, substance use disorder, and psychosis. The chapters devoted to these disorders emphasize MBT skills acquisition and techniques for introducing mentalizing into psychotherapy. Mentalizing plays an important role in understanding how teams, systems, and services interact to facilitate or undermine interventions and service delivery. Chapters on mentalizing in teams and wider systems are included to help clinicians reduce negative impacts on clinical care and support reliable and responsive pathways to treatment. In an effort to encourage clinicians to integrate mentalizing into their clinical practice, empirical research on the developmental origins of mentalizing and how a focus on mentalizing can improve outcomes for patients is incorporated throughout the volume. Improved mentalizing increases resilience to adversity, perhaps protecting individuals from relapse, and improves therapeutic outcomes. The relevant research, as well as proven techniques for promoting resilience and trust, are discussed at length in the book. Finally, as an established component of the literature on neurobiology and higher-order cognition, mentalizing benefits from a number of different strands of research, ranging from neurobiology through child development to adult psychopathology. The book fully explores these relationships and their ramifications. Authoritative, comprehensive, and cutting-edge, the Handbook of Mentalizing in Mental Health Practice is the single most important resource for clinicians and trainees learning about -- and incorporating -- MBT into their therapeutic repertoire.
Mentalization-based therapy is a specific type of psychotherapy designed to help people consider their own thoughts and feelings and differentiate them from the perspectives of others. The editors are the foremost experts on mentalizing, having published two previous books and a multitude of scholarly papers defining it and describing its multiple clinical applications. Handbook of Mentalizing in Mental Health Practice is by far the most cutting-edge, comprehensive source of information and instruction on this critical therapeutic technique, with everything clinicians need to know to integrate mentalizing into their therapeutic repertoire. The editors maintain that the aim of mentalizing therapy is to enhance a mentalizing process, regardless of the context in which it is being delivered. Thus, while most often employed in individual therapy, it can also be useful in group and family therapy situations. Similarly, it may prove equally effective in inpatient and outpatient contexts, and in standard and brief therapy modes. What is critical is the therapist's focus on the patient's "mind-mindedness" as it applies to his or her subjective experience of reality and to awareness of other people's perspectives. Here are some of the key observations made in this fascinating book: Evidence suggests that people who have been diagnosed with a personality disorder may have specific deficits in mentalizing in the context of attachment relationships, and that this group transcends the classification of borderline personality disorder (BPD), which the authors had previously identified with such deficits. This has profound implications for treatment of all types of personality disorders. The authors now see mentalizing as a developmental construct that is extended to the family and throughout an individual's development. This insight suggests that intervention -- and even prevention of deficits -- may be possible. Because mentalizing is a fundamental psychological process, it interfaces with all major mental disorders. This means that mentalizing techniques may have the potential to improve well-being across a range of disorders, including depression, eating disorders, addiction, and even the less severe forms of antisocial personality disorder. Adolescence, the phase of development where personality disorder, depression, eating disorders, substance abuse, and other disorders first emerge, is a critical period for identification of mentalizing deficits and the time when intervention can do enormous good. These insights are tremendously useful for any practitioner of psychotherapy, as well as students in the field. Exhaustive in its coverage of the nature, practice, and exciting potential of this relatively new approach, Handbook of Mentalizing in Mental Health Practice is destined to become a classic in the literature of psychotherapy.
Pioneering research has been carried out over the last decade on mentalization and the promotion of mentalizing capacity - the ability to interpret the behavior of oneself and others as based on intentional mental states, such as needs, desires, feelings, and beliefs. This book is a consolidation of current knowledge and clinical applications, bringing together a group of international experts who have been on the ground floor of theory and research to clarify the concept, review pertinent neurobiological and psychosocial research, and explore its diverse clinical applications. Four sections will cover Conceptual Foundations, Developmental Psychopathology, Intervention and Prevention. A biopsychosocial approach will be used, integrating new research in neuroimaging with psychodynamic and cognitive perspectives. Clinical issues covered will include parent–child interactions, personality disorders, traumatic brain injury, bullying and at-risk children.
This issue discusses the diagnosis and treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD) and other depressive disorders, with an emphasis on the psychosocial aspects of depression: how it affects societies, how it is affected by culture, and what the true meaning of recovery is for those suffering from MDD. The issue is divided into three section: Etiology, Diagnosis and Treatment. Authors address the evidence where biology and subjectivity meet. They discuss what is adaptive and what is pathologic and discuss population-based solutions that take into account the specificity of the individual. Authors also take into account combination treatments of psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy and weigh the treatment choices against specific patient subtypes.
Over the past two decades considerable progress has been made in developing specialist psychosocial treatments for borderline personality disorder (BPD), yet the majority of people with BPD receive treatment within generalist mental health services, rather than specialist treatment centres. This is a book for general mental health professionals who treat people with borderline personality disorder (BPD). It offers practical guidance on how to help people with BPD with advice based on research evidence. After a discussion of the symptoms of BPD, the authors review all the generalist treatment interventions that have resulted in good outcomes in randomised controlled trials, when compared with specialist treatments, and summarise the effective components of these interventions. The treatment strategies are organised into a structured approach called Structured Clinical Management (SCM), which can be delivered by general mental health professionals without extensive additional training. The heart of the book outlines the principles underpinning SCM and offers a step-by-step guide to the clinical intervention. Practitioners can learn the interventions easily and develop more confidence in treating people with BPD. In addition, a chapter is devoted to how to help families - an issue commonly neglected when treating patients with BPD. Finally the authors discuss the top 10 strategies for delivering treatment and outline how the general mental health clinician can deliver these strategies competently.
Attachment theory posits that the need for attachment is a life-long phenomenon that becomes especially relevant in times of crisis or trauma. When adults experience illness, accidents, assaults, psychological difficulties or losses, their attachment-behavioural systems are activated, motivating them to seek help and support from family and friends and/or from helping professionals. However, the resulting request for help is affected and shaped by earlier experiences regarding the support and trustworthiness of attachment figures. Can others be trusted? Is it safe to show vulnerability? How should one behave to increase the likelihood of receiving the help needed? Adult Attachment Patterns in a Treatment Context provides an integrated introduction to the subject of adult attachment. Research into adult attachment patterns offers professional helpers a theoretically sound insight into the dynamics underlying a range of client behaviours, including some of the more puzzling and frustrating behaviours such as denying obvious pain or continually pushing the professional for more personal involvement. Sarah Daniel shows how applying knowledge of attachment patterns to treatment settings will improve the way in which professionals engage with clients and the organization of treatments. This book will be relevant to a range of helping professionals such as psychotherapists, psychologists and social workers, both in practice and in training.
The Stories We Tell Ourselves: Mentalizing Tales of Dating and Marriage is about the dynamics of intimate interpersonal relationships (dating and marriage) - how and why human pairings occur, what helps them function optimally and how therapists can intervene when they don't. J. Mark Thompson and Richard Tuch employ a multidimensional perspective that provides a variety of "lenses" through which intimate relationships can be viewed. The authors also offer a new model of couples therapy based on the mentalization model of treatment developed by Peter Fonagy and his colleagues. This book is aimed at those interested in the nature of intimate relationships as well as those wishing to expand their clinical skills, whether they are conducting one-on-one therapy with individuals struggling to establish and maintain intimate relations or are conducting conjoint treatment with troubled couples who have sought the therapist's assistance. Thompson and Tuch view relationships from a wide array of different perspectives: mentalization, attachment theory, evolutionary psychology, psychoanalysis, pattern recognition (neuroscience), and role theory. A mentalization based approach to couples therapy is clearly explained in a "how to" fashion, with concrete suggestions about how the therapist goes about clinically intervening given their expanded understanding of the dynamics of intimate relations outlined in the book. The Stories We Tell Ourselves: Mentalizing Tales of Dating and Marriage will appeal to psychoanalysts, psychotherapists, psychiatrists, psychologists, clinical social workers, marriage therapists, and all those interested in both learning more about the dynamics of one-on-one intimate relationships (dating and marriage) from a truly multidimensional perspective and in learning how to conduct mentalization-based couples therapy.

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