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On July 4th, 2012, one of physics' most exhilarating results was announced: a new particle – and very likely a new kind of particle – had been discovered at the Large Hadron Collider, the huge particle accelerator designed to reproduce energies present in the universe a fraction of a second after the Big Bang. The particle's existence had been speculated on for nearly fifty years: here, finally, was proof. Professor Lisa Randall of Harvard University is one of the world's most influential theoretical physicists, and author of the bestselling Knocking on Heaven's Door and Warped Passages. In Higgs Discovery she deftly explains both this epochal discovery and it's startlingly beautiful implications.
The recent observation of the Higgs boson has been hailed as the scientific discovery of the century and led to the 2013 Nobel Prize in physics. This book describes the detailed science behind the decades-long search for this elusive particle at the Large Electron Positron Collider at CERN and at the Tevatron at Fermilab and its subsequent discovery and characterization at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. Written by physicists who played leading roles in this epic search and discovery, this book is an authoritative and pedagogical exposition of the portrait of the Higgs boson that has emerged from a large number of experimental measurements. As the first of its kind, this book should be of interest to graduate students and researchers in particle physics.
This book provides a comprehensive overview of the field of Higgs boson physics. It offers the first in-depth review of the complete results in connection with the discovery of the Higgs boson at CERN’s Large Hadron Collider and based on the full dataset for the years 2011 to 2012. The fundamental concepts and principles of Higgs physics are introduced and the important searches prior to the advent of the Large Hadron Collider are briefly summarized. Lastly, the discovery and first mensuration of the observed particle in the course of the CMS experiment are discussed in detail and compared to the results obtained in the ATLAS experiment.
This thesis focuses on the theoretical foundation of the Standard Model valid up to the Planck scale, based on the current experimental facts from the Large Hadron Collider. The thesis consists of two themes: (1) to open up a new window of the Higgs inflation scenario, and (2) to explore a new solution to the naturalness problem in particle physics. In the first area, on the Higgs inflation scenario, the author successfully improves a large value problem on a coupling constant relevant to the Higgs mass in the Standard Model, in which the coupling value of the order of 105 predicted in a conventional scenario is reduced to the order of 10. This result makes the Higgs inflation more attractive because the small value of coupling is natural in the context of ultraviolet completion such as string theory. In the second area, the author provides a new answer to the naturalness problem, of why the cosmological constant and the Higgs mass are extremely small compared with the Planck scale. Based on the baby universe theory originally proposed by Coleman, the smallness of those quantities is successfully explained without introducing any additional new particles relevant at the TeV energy scale.
Supersymmetry (SUSY) is a new symmetry that relates bosons and fermions, which has strong support at both the mathematical and the physical level. This book offers a comprehensive review, following the development of SUSY from its very early days up to present. The order of the contributions should provide the reader with the historical development as well as the latest theoretical updates and interpretations, and experimental constraints from particle accelerators and dark matter searches. It is a great pleasure to bring together here contributions from authors who initiated or have contributed significantly to the development of this theory over so many years. To present a balanced point of view, the book also includes a closing contribution that attempts to describe the physics beyond the Standard Model in the absence of SUSY. The contributions to this book have been previously published in The European Physical Journal C - Particles and Fields.
The Higgs Boson: Searching for the God Particle by the Editors of Scientific American Updated 2017 Edition! For the fifth anniversary of one of the biggest discoveries in physics, we’ve updated this eBook to include our continuing analysis of the discovery, of the questions it answers and those it raises. As the old adage goes, where there’s smoke, there’s fire. Where there is effect, there must be cause. The planet Neptune was found in 1846 because the mathematics of Newton's laws, when applied to the orbit of Uranus, said some massive body had to be there. Astronomers eventually found it, using the best telescopes available to peer into the sky. This same logic is applied to the search for the Higgs boson. One consequence of the prevailing theory of physics, called the Standard Model, is that there has to be some field that gives particles their particular masses. With that there has to be a corresponding particle, made by creating waves in the field, and this is the Higgs boson, the so-called God particle. This eBook chronicles the search – and demonstrates the power of a good theory. Based on the Standard Model, physicists believed something had to be there, but it wasn't until the Large Hadron Collider was built that anyone could see evidence of the Higgs – and finally in July 2012, they did. A Higgs-like particle was found near the energies scientists expected to find it. Now, armed with better evidence and better questions, the scientific process continues. This eBook gathers the best reporting and analysis from Scientific American to explain that process – the theories, the search, the ongoing questions. In essence, everything you need to know to separate Higgs from hype.
The book aims to explain the historical development of particle physics, with special emphasis on CERN and collider physics. It describes in detail the LHC accelerator and its detectors, describing the science involved as well as the sociology of big collaborations, culminating with the discovery of the Higgs boson. Readers are led step-by-step to understanding why we do particle physics, as well as the tools and problems involved in the field. It provides an insider's view on the experiments at the Large Hadron Collider.

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