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This book presents a critique of neoliberalism within UK Higher Education, taking its cue from approaches more usually associated with literary studies. It offers a sustained and detailed close reading of three works that might be understood to fall outside the established body of educational theory. The unconventional methodology and focus promote irreducible difference and complexity, and in this stage a resistance to reductive discourses of managerialism. Questioning the materialism to which all sides of the contemporary pedagogical debate increasingly appeal, the book sets out a challenge to investments in ‘excellence’, ‘transparency’ and objecthood. It will be of interest to students and researchers in the fields of education, sociology, and literary theory.
Taubman offers interdisciplinary ways to understand the educational reforms underway in urban education, teaching, and teacher education, and their impact on what it means to teach. He maps the totality of the transformation, taking into account the constellation of forces shaping it, and proposes an alternative vision of teacher education.
Reconstructing Policy in Higher Education highlights the work of accomplished and award-winning scholars and provides concrete examples of how feminist poststructuralism effectively informs research methods and can serve as a vital tool for policy makers, analysts, and practitioners. The research examines a range of topics of interest to scholars and professionals including: purposes of Higher Education, administrative leadership, athletics, diversity, student activism, social class, the history of women in postsecondary institutions, and quality and science in the globalized university. Students enrolled in Higher Education and Educational Policy programs will find this book offers them tools for thinking differently about policy analysis and educational practice. Higher Education faculty, managers, deans, presidents, and policy makers will find this book contributes significantly to their own policy analysis, practice, and discourse. Elizabeth J. Allan is an Associate Professor of Higher Education at the University of Maine where she is also an affiliated faculty member with the Women’s Studies program. Susan V. Iverson is an Assistant Professor of Higher Education Administration & Student Personnel at Kent State University where she is also an affiliated faculty member with the Women’s Studies Program. Rebecca Ropers-Huilman is a Professor of Higher Education at the University of Minnesota.
The book thus seeks to trace the construction and contestation of the central axes around which its political frontiers were organized.
Encyclopedic review about gender and its impact on American higher education across historical and cultural contexts. The contributors describe the ways in which gender is embedded in the educational practices, curriculum, institutional structures and governance of colleges and universities. Topics included are: institutional diversity; academic majors and programs; extracurricular organizations such as sororities, fraternities and women's centers; affirmative action and other higher educational policies; and theories that have been used to analyze and explain the ways in which gender in academe is constructed.
The central argument of this book posits that today's American university is dysfunctional or, perhaps, «Dysacademic.» This affective disorder is traced to the increasingly corporate and performative utilities of many contemporary institutions of higher education. Today's commodified and closed university doesn't transform the self as it once did, when the pedagogy of Bildung emphasized the development of character and culture by teaching «the rules of thought.» Rather, the dysfunctional American university controls, constricts, and normalizes its subjects according to hyper-structured, accreditation-happy, economically driven disciplinary specialization, and a priori established standards and outcomes that work to define and transform the effective utility of higher education. After deconstructing the discourse of Dysacademia, the author outlines his vision for a third curriculum, one wrought with complexity, self-organization, and critical, open spaces.
Developments in the education field are affected by numerous, and often conflicting, social, cultural, and economic factors. With the increasing corporatization of education, teaching and learning paradigms are continuously altered. Deconstructing the Education-Industrial Complex in the Digital Age is an authoritative reference source for the latest scholarly research on the shifting structure of school models in response to technological advances and corporate presence in educational contexts. Highlighting a comprehensive range of pertinent topics, such as teacher education, digital literacy, and neoliberalism, this book is ideally designed for educators, professionals, graduate students, researchers, and academics interested in the implications of the education-industrial complex.
Introduction: The promise of politics and pedagogy / Michael A. Peters and Gert Biesta -- Deconstruction, justice, and the vocation of education / Gert Biesta -- Derrida as a profound humanist / Michael A. Peters -- Derrida, Nietzsche, and the return to the subject / Michael A. Peters -- From critique to deconstruction : Derrida as a critical philosopher / Gert Biesta -- Education after deconstruction : between event and invention / Gert Biesta -- The university and the future of the humanities / Michael A. Peters -- Welcome! postscript on hospitality, cosmopolitanism, and the other / Michael A. Peters.
This work examines spoken language as a field of study, looking at the various ways in which we can both theorize the place of talk in education, and examine the way talk is actually done in educational settings. It brings quite different and important perspectives to the study of education. It is relevant to teachers at primary, secondary and tertiary levels and for researchers interested in spoken language in educational contexts.
Now available in paperback, this two-volume work is intended to help readers develop powerful new ways of thinking about organizational principles, and apply them to policy-making and management in colleges and universities. The book is written with two audiences in mind: administrative and faculty leaders in institutions of higher learning, and students (both doctoral and Master's degree) studying to become upper-level administrators, leaders, and policy makers in higher education. It systematically presents a range of theories that can be applied to many of the difficult management situations that college and university leaders encounter. It provides them with the theoretical background to knowledgeably evaluate the many new ideas that emerge in the current literature, and in workshops and conferences. The purpose is to help leaders develop their own effective management style and approaches, and feel confident that their actions are informed by appropriate theory and knowledge of the latest research in the field. Without theory, organizational leaders are forced to treat each problem that they encounter as unique–as if it were a first-time occurrence. While leaders may have some experience with a particular issue, their solutions are usually not informed by the accumulated wisdom of others who have already encountered and resolved similar situations. The authors approach the theory of the organization and administration of colleges and universities from three quite different perspectives, or paradigms, each relying on different assumptions about the “reality” of organizational life in colleges and universities. The positivist paradigm–primarily an omnibus systems theory–integrates the chapters into a comprehensive, yet easily accessible whole. Social constructionism, the second paradigm, is introduced in each chapter to illuminate the difficulty of seeking and finding meaningful consensus on problems and policies, while also addressing important ethical issues that tend to be overlooked in leadership thought and action. The third paradigm, postmodernism, draws attention to difficulties of logic and communication under the constraints of strictly linear thinking that “authorities” at all levels attempt to impose on organizations. This “multiple paradigm” approach enables readers to become more cognizant of their own assumptions, how they may differ from those of others in their organization, and how those differences may both create difficulties in resolving problems and expand the range of alternatives considered in organizational decision making. The book offers readers the tools to balance the real-world needs to succeed in today’s challenging and competitive environment with the social and ethical aspirations of all its stakeholders and society at large. The authors’ aim is to elucidate how administration can be made more efficient and effective through rational decision-making while also respecting humanistic values. This approach highlights a range of phenomena that require attention if the institution is ultimately to be considered successful.
Contains more that 300,000 records covering sociology, social work, and other social sciences. Covers 1963 to the present. Updated six times per year.
More than ever before, the arts are shaping and influencing our daily lives through the media and the creative industries. The arts are no longer confined to museums and theatres, but are adding value to our national economies and improving the quality of education. This has implications for arts education. However, unlike other subjects taught at schools, the arts have rarely made their purpose clear: Why are they taught? What is good arts education? And what are the benefits of teaching creative subjects or using creative ways to teach? In 2004 Professor Anne Bamford conducted the first international analysis of arts education research for UNESCO, in partnership with IFACCA and the Australia Council. Comparing data and case studies from more than 60 countries, the book analyses the differences between 'education in the arts' and 'education through the arts'. While appreciating that arts programmes are embedded in their unique social and cultural contexts, Professor Bamford develops internationally comparable standards for quality arts education. In addition, she identifies a number of concrete educational, cultural, and social benefits of arts education. This definitive work is of major interest to policy-makers, educators and artists. Professor Anne Bamford is Director of the Engine Room at the University of the Arts London and has an international reputation for her research in arts education, emerging literacies and visual communication. Through her research as a World Scholar for UNESCO, she has pursued issues of innovation, social impact and equity and diversity. She has conducted major national impact and evaluation studies for the governments of Denmark, The Netherlands, Belgium and Australia.
Quality, Access and Social Justice in Higher Education highlights the need to address the ground realities of educational policies and practices in India and is useful for scholars and practitioners in the fields of sociology and education, and policymaker. It discusses quality of education, the ease of access to education, and its spread across diverse social groups and possible resolutions to help shape effective educational policies.
The Vicos Project was a major effort to apply anthropology to community development in a rural community of Andean Peru in the 1950s. Deconstructing Development Discourse in Peru is a retrospective examination of the Vicos research and development project through a poststructuralist lens. William Stein details the work of North American researchers, with emphasis on factors which limited their capacity to engage in development. Stein endeavors to apply the work of the French philosopher, Jacques Derrida, as an aid in the interpretation of events and reactions of both North American and Peruvian researchers.
This ground-breaking book analyzes contemporary education discourse in the light of curriculum politics and popular culture, using sources ranging from academic scholarship to popular magazines, music video, film and television game shows. Mathematics is used as an “extreme case,” since it is a discipline so easily accepted as separable from politics, ethics or the social construction of knowledge. Appelbaum’s juxtaposition of popular culture, public debate and professional practice enables an examination of the production and mediation of “common sense” distinctions between school mathematics and the world outside of schools. Terrain ordinarily displaced or excluded by traditional education literature becomes the pendulum for a new conversation which merges research and practice while discarding pre-conceived categories of understanding The book also serves as an entertaining introduction to emerging theories in cultural studies, progressively illustrating the uses of discourse analysis for comprehending ideology, the implications of power/knowledge links, professional practice as a technology of power, and curriculum as at once commodities and cultural resources. In this way, Appelbaum effectively reveals a direction for teachers, students and researchers to cooperatively form a community attentive to the politics of curriculum and popular culture
Reflective Teaching in Higher Education is the definitive textbook for reflective teachers in higher education. Informed by the latest research in this area, the book offers extensive support for those at the start of an academic career and career-long professionalism for those teaching in higher education. Written by an international collaborative author team of higher education experts led by Paul Ashwin, Reflective Teaching in Higher Education offers two levels of support: - practical guidance for day-to-day teaching, covering key issues such as strategies for improving learning, teaching and assessment, curriculum design, relationships, communication, and inclusion; and - evidence-informed 'principles' to aid understanding of how theories can effectively inform teaching practices, offering ways to develop a deeper understanding of teaching and learning in higher education. Case studies, activities, research briefings and annotated key readings are provided throughout. The author team: Paul Ashwin (Lancaster University, UK) | David Boud (University of Technology, Sydney, Australia) | Kelly Coate (King's Learning Institute, King's College London, UK) | Fiona Hallett (Edge Hill University, UK) | Elaine Keane (National University of Ireland, Galway, Ireland) | Kerri-Lee Krause (Victoria University, Melbourne, Australia) | Brenda Leibowitz (University of Johannesburg, South Africa) | Iain MacLaren (National University of Ireland, Galway, Ireland) | Jan McArthur (Lancaster University, UK) | Velda McCune (University of Edinburgh, UK) | Michelle Tooher National University of Ireland, Galway, Ireland) This book forms part of the Reflective Teaching series, edited by Andrew Pollard and Amy Pollard, offering support for reflective practice in early, primary, secondary, further, vocational, university and adult sectors of education. Reflective Teaching in Higher Education and its website, www.reflectiveteaching.co.uk, promote the expertise of teaching within higher education.

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