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And Other Tales of Bent Life in a Straight World
The Advocate is a lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender (LGBT) monthly newsmagazine. Established in 1967, it is the oldest continuing LGBT publication in the United States.
500 entries from more than 100 contributors, profiling gay and lesbians throughout history, ranging from Sappho to Andre Gide; most entries are accompanied by a bibliography.
This groundbreaking critical anthology gathers together a wide range of primary source material on lesbian lives in the past. The material here is drawn from a diverse range of sources, including court records, newspaper reports, literary sources, writings on lesbianism from psychologists, doctors, anthropologists, as well as personal letters and journals. The sources are arranged into thematic chapters, covering topics such as archetypes of lesbians - cross-dressing women and romantic friends, the making of lesbianism in culture, professional discourse on lesbians, public perceptions of lesbianism and women's own experiences. This book will be a milestone in the publishing of lesbian history, and is set to provoke the impetus for fresh research.
Provides a comprehensive modern biographical survey of homosexuality in the Western world. Among those included are:* controversial political activists - Peter Tatchell; Guy Hocquenghem; Harvey Milk* pop icons - David Bowie; k d lang; Boy George* groundbreaking artists, writers and filmmakers - Pier Paolo Pasolini; Derek Jarman; David Hockney* intellectuals who have shaped and changed the modern understanding of sexuality - Michel Foucault; Simone de Beauvoir; Alfred Kinsey* over 500 entries - clear, informative and enjoyable to read - build up a superbly thorough overview of gay and lesbian life in our time.
From the clamshell razors and homemade lye depilatories used in colonial America to the diode lasers and prescription pharmaceuticals available today, Americans have used a staggering array of tools to remove hair deemed unsightly, unnatural, or excessive. This is true especially for women and girls; conservative estimates indicate that 99% of American women have tried hair removal, and at least 85% regularly remove hair from their faces, armpits, legs, and bikini lines. How and when does hair become a problem—what makes some growth “excessive”? Who or what separates the necessary from the superfluous? In Plucked, historian Rebecca Herzig addresses these questions about hair removal. She shows how, over time, dominant American beliefs about visible hair changed: where once elective hair removal was considered a “mutilation” practiced primarily by “savage” men, by the turn of the twentieth century, hair-free faces and limbs were expected for women. Visible hair growth—particularly on young, white women—came to be perceived as a sign of political extremism, sexual deviance, or mental illness. By the turn of the twenty-first century, more and more Americans were waxing, threading, shaving, or lasering themselves smooth. Herzig’s extraordinary account also reveals some of the collateral damages of the intensifying pursuit of hair-free skin. Moving beyond the experiences of particular patients or clients, Herzig describes the surprising histories of race, science, industry, and medicine behind today's hair-removing tools. Plucked is an unsettling, gripping, and original tale of the lengths to which Americans will go to remove hair.
This book re-prints various essays on gay history from around Europe and America. Includes one essay in German and one in Italian.
Lesbian Sex is the first contemporary oral history devoted exclusively to lesbian sexuality. Lesbian Sex is in-depth interviews with a diverse group of lesbians who reveal the intimate details about their sexual behavior and tell what sex means to them in the larger context of their lives.
Featuring sixteen contributions from recognized authorities in their respective fields, this superb new mapping of women's writing ranges from feminine middlebrow novels to Virginia Woolf's modernist aesthetics, from women's literary journalism to crime fiction, and from West End drama to the literature of Scotland, Ireland and Wales.
This updated edition to the classic planner is “a chatty, humorous compendium of traditions, advice, and wedding details geared for same-sex couples” (Publishers Weekly). Wedding planning is never easy—but for gay and lesbian couples, it presents unique challenges. On top of watching the budget and wrangling your family, you may be wondering: How should we word the invitations? Who can perform the ceremony? What should we say to those who ask, “ . . . why?” This trusty guide—first published when legal same-sex marriage was just a dream—tackles all that and more. Here are tips on finding the perfect venue, vows, outfits, cake, kit, and caboodle, as well as: Creative workarounds (Have you considered a home wedding?) Budget-friendly shortcuts (Supplement the tiered cake with a sheet cake.) The latest trends (How to buck the traditions that don’t work for you.) And sage wisdom, with a wink! (Rule #1: If you invite them, they may come!) If you’d rather stay crazy about each other than go crazy, The Essential Guide to Gay and Lesbian Weddings—filled with “witty, wise, and practical advice”—is for you (Library Journal). “All you need is love—and this book—to have a great wedding.” —Melissa Etheridge, musician and LGBT activist
The History of Gay People in Alcoholics Anonymous documents and honors the ways thousands of LGBT people have carried Alcoholics Anonymous' message. This illuminating chronicle includes interviews and documents that detail the compelling history, recovery, and wisdom of gay people in AA. The book examines the challenges AA faced as the fellowship endeavored to become a more inclusive and cohesive community. The first-person accounts narrate the important work of influential gay and straight AA members that led key events in AA’s history. The author includes material on the steps and traditions of AA, and on becoming an ally to LGBT people on the road to recovery. Topics in The History of Gay People in Alcoholics Anonymous include: the gay origins of AA’s Third Tradition a comparison of treatments for alcoholism and homosexuality compelling portraits of sober gay life in the 1950s and 1960s the debate in AA over meetings for gay alcoholics interviews with members and co-founders of the first gay AA meetings the history of the first gay AA/Al-Anon conference interviews with pioneering gay addiction professionals the history of AA pamphlet “AA and the Gay/Lesbian Alcoholic” Alcoholics Together, and why a parallel AA organization for gay alcoholics formed in southern California strategies AA’s gay members developed to make their meetings simultaneously safe and public—and why some of them are still necessary today much more The History of Gay People in Alcoholics Anonymous is an enlightening book for members of the LGBT and heterosexual recovering community, alcoholism and addiction professionals, as well as physicians, counselors, psychiatrists, psychologists, social workers, clergy, historians, sociologists, educators, students, and anyone interested in learning more about AA or this aspect of the community’s history.
Online version of the 3-vol. work published by Gale providing a comprehensive survey of lesbian and gay history and culture in the United States.
Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) people have established gathering spaces to find acceptance, form social networks, and unify to resist oppression. Framing the emergence of queer enclaves in reference to place, this volume explores the physical and symbolic spaces of LGBTQ Americans. Authors provide an overview of the concept of “place” and its role in informing identity formation and community building. The book also includes interactive project prompts, providing opportunities to practically apply topics and theories discussed in the chapters.
From fur coats to nude paintings, and from sports to beauty contests, the body has been central to the literal and figurative fashioning of ourselves as individuals and as a nation. In this first collection on the history of the body in Canada, an interdisciplinary group of scholars explores the multiple ways the body has served as a site of contestation in Canadian history in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Showcasing a variety of methodological approaches, Contesting Bodies and Nation in Canadian History includes essays on many themes that engage with the larger historical relationship between the body and nation: medicine and health, fashion and consumer culture, citizenship and work, and more. The contributors reflect on the intersections of bodies with the concept of nationhood, as well as how understandings of the body are historically contingent. The volume is capped off with a critical introductory chapter by the editors on the history of bodies and the development of the body as a category of analysis.
This collaborative History aims to become the standard work on Victorian literature for the twenty-first century. Well-known scholars introduce readers to their particular fields, discuss influential critical debates and offer illuminating contextual detail to situate authors and works in their wider cultural and historical contexts. Sections on publishing and readership and a chronological survey of major literary developments between 1837 and 1901, are followed by essays on topics including sexuality, sensation, cityscapes, melodrama, epic and economics. Victorian writing is placed in its complex relation to the Empire, Europe and America, as well as to Britain's component nations. The final chapters consider how Victorian literature, and the period as a whole, influenced twentieth-century writers. Original, lucid and stimulating, each chapter is an important contribution to Victorian literary studies. Together, the contributors create an engaging discussion of the ways in which the Victorians saw themselves and of how their influence has persisted.
Clinical Reproductive Medicine and Surgery is the new, definitive resource in reproductive medicine. This unique text offers detailed discussion on both the medical and surgical management of reproductive disorders, as well as coverage of associated imaging modalities. Included are chapters on Reproductive Genetics, Management of Endometriosis (including interventional radiology), Ultrasonography and Sonohysterography, Preservation of Fertility, and Recurrent Pregnancy Loss. A resource every practitioner interested in Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility needs! Offers detailed discussion of medical and surgical management of reproductive disorders ... No other text offers coverage of both medical and surgical management in one resource. Covers gynecologic disorders that impact fertility--an important aspect of identifying fertility issues, not included in major competition Section on basic reproductive biology ... Not overly detailed -- Written for a clinician to understand how to practice reproductive medicine Section on reproductive imaging ... Unique to this text - includes US and MRI of the reproductive organs Algorithm in each chapter ... 4-color throughout ... Demonstrates the appropriate clinical investigation and management ... Offers attractive layout and best views of surgical procedures
Queer Style offers an insight into queer fashionability by addressing the role that clothing has played in historical and contemporary lifestyles. From a fashion studies perspective, it examines the function of subcultural dress within queer communities and the mannerisms and messages that are used as signifiers of identity. Diverse dress is examined, including effeminate 'pansy,' masculine macho 'clone,' the 'lipstick' and 'butch' lesbian styles and the extreme styles of drag kings and drag queens. Divided into three main sections on history, subcultural identity and subcultural style, Queer Style will be of particular interest to students of dress and fashion as well as those coming to subculture from sociology and cultural studies.
Popular historian Thaddeus Russell offers a highly provocative and absorbing new perspective on America's history that will turn convention on its head and is sure to elicit as much controversy as it does support. Russell shows that drunkards, laggards, prostitutes, and pirates were the real heroes of the American Revolution. Slaves worked less and had more fun than free men. Prostitutes, not feminists, won women's liberation. White people lost their rhythm when they became good Americans. Without organized crime, we might not have Hollywood, Las Vegas, labour unions, legal alcohol, birth control, or gay rights. Zoot-suiters and rock-and-rollers, not Ronald Reagan or the peace movement, brought down the Soviet Union. And Britney Spears will win the war on terror. The more that 'bad' people existed, resisted, and won, the greater was our common good. In A RENEGADE HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES, Russell introduces us to the origins of America's identity as we have never seen it before.

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