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"This Bn was raised in September 1914 With volunteers from Queensland and Tasmania. It followed the familiar trail of so many other Australian units of that period - Egypt, Gallipoli, France and Flanders. The 1915 actions at Quinn's Post, Hill 971, and Suvla Bay, are well described, as are the bitter actions of 1916-1918 on the Western Front. An excellent history of a Bn which suffered, in total, 1200 killed and 2500 wounded. It also gained an exceptional number of awards, including one VC. Many individuals are named in the narrative. Roll of Honour(with dates causes and locations) Honours and Awards, and unit nominal roll complete this history"--Publisher description.
On 25 April 1915 Australian troops landed on the shores of the Gallipoli Peninsula, racing up the rocky slopes towards First Ridge and into the annals of military history. Just after noon the New Zealanders joined in, fighting off numerous determined Turkish counter-attacks. The Anzac legend of courage and endurance in the face of adversity was born. But the failure to push on during the first critical hours of the battle set the course for a protracted and costly stalemate.In August a major offensive was launched to break free of the beachhead prison, seize the high ground north of Anzac and strike the Dardanelles side of the peninsula. It was a spectacular failure and, by October, evacuation was in the air. The courageous and stubborn resistance of the Turkish foe had won out. Our Friend the Enemy is the first detailed history of the Gallipoli campaign at Anzac since Charles Bean’s Official History. Viewed from both sides of the wire and described in first-hand accounts. Australian Captain Herbert Layh recounted that as they approached the beach on 25 April that, once we were behind cover the Turks turned their ... [fire] on us, and gave us a lively 10 minutes. A poor chap next to me was hit three times. He begged me to shoot him, but luckily for him a fourth bullet got him and put him out of his pain. Later that day, Sergeant Charles Saunders, a New Zealand engineer, described his first taste of battle, The Turks were entrenched some 50-100 yards from the edge of the face of the gully and their machine guns swept the edges. Line after line of our men went up, some lines didn’t take two paces over the crest when down they went to a man and on came another line. Gunner Recep Trudal of the Turkish 27th Regiment wrote of the fierce Turkish counter-attack on 19 May designed to push the Anzac’s back into the sea, It started at morning prayer call time, and then it went on and on, never stopped. You know there was no break for eating or anything ... Attack was our command. That was what the Pasha said. Once he says “Attack”, you attack, and you either die or you survive. The Gallipoli campaign involved a mix of nationalities that went beyond the Anzacs and Turks to include German officers, and British and Indian troops. These are the people whose words tell this story — the courage and heroism, the monotony and often humour that accompanied the horrors of the bitter fight to claim the peninsula.
Gardens of Hell examines the human side of one of the great tragedies of modern warfare, the Gallipoli campaign of the First World War. In February 1915, beginning with a naval attack on Turkey in the Dardanelles, a combined force of British, Australian, New Zealand, Indian, and French troops invaded the Gallipoli Peninsula only to face crushing losses and an ignominious retreat from what seemed a hopeless mission. Both sides in the battle suffered huge casualties, with a combined 127,000 servicemen killed during the action. Patrick Gariepy has pieced together the battle from combatantsÆ own words. Drawn from diaries and letters and from stories passed down through generations of families, these firsthand accounts offer an honest, heartfelt, and sometimes painful testimony to a doomed campaign fought by the men who lived through the fury, terror, and grief that was Gallipoli. Gardens of Hell is a sensitive acknowledgment of the enormous human cost of military folly and failure.
A biography of Martin O'Meara, Australia's only Irish-born Victoria Cross recipient of the First World War. Originally from County Tipperary, O'Meara served with the Australian Imperial Force in Egypt and on the Western Front between 1916 and 1918. His Victoria Cross was awarded for bravery near Mouquet Farm in August 1916. He suffered a serious mental breakdown shortly after returning to Australia in November 1918 and spent the rest of his life in mental hospitals in Perth. He died in 1935.
"Was Beersheba the last great cavalry charge in history? Did the AIF storm the red light districts of Cairo and burn it to the ground while fighting running battles with the military police? Was the AIF the only all-volunteer army of World War I? Bully beef and balderash shines a critical light on these and other well-known myths of the AIF in World War I, arguing that these spectacular legends simply serve to diminish the hard-won reputation of the AIF as a fighting force."--Dust jacket.
The Battle of the Somme is widely regarded as one of the bloodiest and most controversial land battles ever fought. The first British troops went over the top on 1 July 1916 and by the day's end some 19,000 had been killed in the greatest one-day loss the British Army has ever known. This notoriety has ensured that the Somme and its many fallen warriors live on in countless books, plays and films. Documentary sources about the Somme abound and there is a voracious appetite among the book-buying public for more. Legacy of the Somme 1916 is a unique bibliographical and media guide to the battle, setting on record - in as comprehensive a listing as is possible - much of what has been written, filmed or sound-recorded in the English language between 1916 and 1995. This detailed listing includes official, unofficial and unit histories of the British and Commonwealth armies; biographies, autobiographies and memoirs; literature, drama and media; archives, tanks and war graves registers. Short commentaries accompany each entry and a detailed index enables accurate cross-referencing of subjects. First and foremost this is a unique work of reference which will appeal to all with an interest in the First World War. It will aid historians, researchers and enthusiasts to track down the vast amount of information available on the battle, and will also prove valuable to libraries, museums and the book trade.

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