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Explores ancient civilizations and cultures from the dawn of humankind up to and including the Middle Ages.
A student-friendly textbook covering the fundamentals of social formations and cultural patterns of the ancient and medieval world. Ancient and Medieval World provides an accessible overview of the period ranging from the evolution of human beings to the end of the Middle Ages in Europe. The book intricately weaves in the research findings of the last decade, which brought about new dimensions on social, economic, political, religious and several other themes of the ancient and medieval world. It presents a comprehensive and well-balanced assessment of the various developments, discoveries and debates in human history that paved the way for the modern world. The use of various maps, images, tables and other robust pedagogical features will motivate readers to read more and help them to connect better with the topic. This book is an ideal companion for students of history, UGC NET and UPSC aspirants as well as general readers. Key Features: • Closely integrates recent research and studies on the subject that have appeared over the last decade. • Introduction of topics and themes such as Nomadic Groups in Central and West Asia and Religion and Culture in Medieval Europe along with new sub-themes. • Provides maps, images, keywords, review questions and extensive bibliography for clearer understanding of themes and issues. • Extensive summary at the end of each chapter to help the reader recapitulate better.
The Emergence of Subjectivity in the Ancient and Medieval World: An Interpretation of Western Civilization represents a combination of different genres: cultural history, philosophical anthropology, and textbook. It follows a handful of different but interrelated themes through more than a dozen texts that were written over a period of several millennia and, by means of an analysis of these texts, presents a theory of the development of Western civilization from antiquity to the Middle Ages. The main line of argument traces the various self-conceptions of different cultures as they developed historically, reflecting different views of what it is to be human. The thesis of the volume is that through examination of these changes we can discern the gradual emergence of what we today call inwardness, subjectivity, and individual freedom. As human civilization took its first tenuous steps, it had a very limited conception of the individual. Instead, the dominant principle was that of the wider group: the family, clan, or people. Only in the course of history did the idea of what we now know as individuality begin to emerge, and it took millennia for this idea to be fully recognized and developed. The conception of human beings as having a sphere of inwardness and subjectivity subsequently had a sweeping impact on all aspects of culture, including philosophy, religion, law, and art: indeed, this notion largely constitutes what is today referred to as modernity. It is easy to lose sight of the fact that this modern conception of human subjectivity was not simply something given, but rather the result of a long process of historical and cultural development.
This social history of war from the third millennium BCE to the 10th-century CE in the Mediterranean, the Near East and Europe (Egypt, Achamenid Persia, Greece, the Hellenistic World, the Roman Republic and Empire, the Byzantine Empire, the early Islamic World and early Medieval Europe) with parallel studies of Mesoamerica (the Maya and Aztecs) and East Asia (ancient China, medieval Japan). The volume offers a broadly based, comparative examination of war and military organization in their complex interactions with social, economic and political structures, as well as cultural practices.
This new, thoroughly revised edition examines world history from the emergence of the earliest humans about two million years ago all the way to the end of the Middle Ages. Following a generally chronological approach, the encyclopedia provides in-depth coverage of cultures, people, and events. - Publisher.
A masterful narrative of the Middle Ages, when religion became a weapon for kings all over the world. From the schism between Rome and Constantinople to the rise of the T’ang Dynasty, from the birth of Muhammad to the crowning of Charlemagne, this erudite book tells the fascinating, often violent story of kings, generals, and the peoples they ruled. In her earlier work, The History of the Ancient World, Susan Wise Bauer wrote of the rise of kingship based on might. But in the years between the fourth and the twelfth centuries, rulers had to find new justification for their power, and they turned to divine truth or grace to justify political and military action. Right thus replaces might as the engine of empire. Not just Christianity and Islam but the religions of the Persians and the Germans, and even Buddhism, are pressed into the service of the state. This phenomenon—stretching from the Americas all the way to Japan—changes religion, but it also changes the state.
Provides information on over 70,000 events from prehistory to the present.
Over 400 figures are presented for their significant contributions to the literature, religion, philosophy, education, or politics that influenced the development and culture of the Medieval world.
Seven, diverse papers, written by ancient and medieval historians, are collected in this volume. These papers were presented at the academic conference "Politics and Religion in Ancient and Medieval Europe and Asia," organized by the Department of History and New Asia College of The Chinese University of Hong Kong in March 1996. Although the papers vary widely in the region and time-span, they are joined by their concern about the relationship between politics and different religions Christianity, Buddhism, Taoism and others in ancient and medieval Europe and Asia.
Which was the most brilliant of Hannibal's three crushing defeats of Roman armies? What tactics did Julius Caesar employ to defeat Pompey at Pharsalus? How was Alexander the Great able to command sufficient loyalty from his troops to lead them across half of the Asian landmass in search of new territories to conquer? What qualities made Attila the Hun a strategist of genius? How did Henry V of England achieve victory at Agincourt for the loss of a few hundred of his men, when the mounted French knights suffered casualties in the thousands?The answers to these and a myriad other fascinating questions can be found in The Art of War, a sumptuous chronological survey of the 50 greatest commanders of the ancient and medieval worlds. Compiled by an distinguished team of historians (including such names as Robin Lane Fox, Tom Holland, John Julius Norwich, Jonathan Sumption and Felipe Fernandez-Armesto) working under the general editorship of the Andrew Roberts, The Art of War is an authoritative and beautifully illustrated account of the lives and careers of the 50 greatest military commanders of the period, from Julius Caesar to Judas Maccabeus, from Belisarius to Bohemond, and from Trajan to Tamerlane. Every commander is profiled in a concise and informative 3000-word article which not only brings its subject vividly to life via a lively, fact-driven narrative, but also analyses and assesses his tactical and strategic gifts. Each biography is accompanied by a 'battle feature' or 'campaign feature' - embellished by a full-colour battle plan or campaign map - focusing on the commander's greatest battlefield achievement.As accessible and informative as it is rigorous and scholarly, The Art of War is the perfect introduction to its subject for the layperson - but also a stimulating and thought-provoking read for those with greater knowledge of military history. With its companion volume Born to Command, it forms an indispensable guide to the greatest generals the world has seen.
Inquiring into childhood is one of the most appropriate ways to address the perennial and essential question of what it is that makes human beings – each of us – human. In Childhood in History: Perceptions of Children in the Ancient and Medieval Worlds, Aasgaard, Horn, and Cojocaru bring together the groundbreaking work of nineteen leading scholars in order to advance interdisciplinary historical research into ideas about children and childhood in the premodern history of European civilization. The volume gathers rich insights from fields as varied as pedagogy and medicine, and literature and history. Drawing on a range of sources in genres that extend from philosophical, theological, and educational treatises to law, art, and poetry, from hagiography and autobiography to school lessons and sagas, these studies aim to bring together these diverse fields and source materials, and to allow the development of new conversations. This book will have fulfilled its unifying and explicit goal if it provides an impetus to further research in social and intellectual history, and if it prompts both researchers and the interested wider public to ask new questions about the experiences of children, and to listen to their voices.
This lavishly illustrated full-color set is organized by the time frames that mirror the National Standards for world history for grades 6-12. An ideal supplement to all the major textbooks, it offers appealing and comprehensive biographies of history's most influential figures - both famous and infamous."Lifelines in World History" features biographies of figures from Africa, the Americas, Asia and the Pacific, Europe, and Southwest Asia, and covers the most significant events and trends in world history. Each volume includes 15-20 biographies, and in addition to biographical information, each entry includes engaging sidebars that feature key dates, more people to know, words from their time, and cultural connections. The set also includes numerous full-color maps.
Warfare in the Medieval World explores how civilizations and cultures made war on the battlefields of the Near East and Europe in the period between the fall of Rome and the introduction of reliable gunpowder weapons during the Thirty Years War. Through an exploration of thirty-three selected battles, military historian Brian Todd Carey surveys the changing tactical relationships between the four weapon systems-heavy and light infantry and heavy and light cavalry—focusing on the evolution of shock and missile combat. This is the second part of an ambitious two-volume study of the subject. The first volume, Warfare in the Ancient World, examined the evolution of warfare from the Bronze Age to the highly organized armies of the Greeks and the Romans.
While scholars have long documented the migration of people in ancient and medieval times, they have paid less attention to those who traveled across borders with some regularity. This study of early transnational relations explores the routine interaction of people across the boundaries of empires, tribal confederacies, kingdoms, and city-states, paying particular attention to the role of long-distance trade along the Silk Road and maritime trade routes. It examines the obstacles voyagers faced, including limited travel and communication capabilities, relatively poor geographical knowledge, and the dangers of a fragmented and shifting political landscape, and offers profiles of better-known transnational elites such as the Hellenic scholar Herodotus and the Venetian merchant Marco Polo, as well lesser known servants, merchants, and sailors. By revealing the important political, economic, and cultural role cross-border trade and travel played in ancient society, this work demonstrates that transnationalism is not unique to modern times. Instructors considering this book for use in a course may request an examination copy here.
Basic Approach Developed as a comprehensive introductory work for scholars and students of ancient and early medieval Indian history, this books provides the most exhaustive overview of the subject. Dividing the vast historical expanse from the stone age to the 12th century into broad chronological units, it constructs profiles of various geographical regions of the subcontinent, weaving together and analysing an unparalleled range of literary and archaeological evidence. Dealing with prehistory and protohistory of the subcontinent in considerable detail, the narrative of the historical period breaks away from conventional text-based history writing. Providing a window into the world primary sources, it incorporates a large volume of archaeological data, along with literary, epigraphic, and numismatic evidence. Revealing the ways in which our past is constructed, it explains fundamental concepts, and illuminates contemporary debates, discoveries, and research. Situating prevailing historical debates in their contexts, Ancient and Early Medieval India presents balanced assessments, encouraging readers to independently evaluate theories, evidence, and arguments. Beautifully illustrated with over four hundred photographs, maps, and figures, Ancient and Early Medieval India helps visualize and understand the extraordinarily rich and varied remains of the ancient past of Indian subcontinent. It offers a scholarly and nuanced yet lucid account of India s early past, and will surely transform the discovery of this past into an exciting experience. Tabel of Contents List of photographs List of maps List of figures About the author Preface Acknowledgements A readers guide 1. Understanding Literary and Archaeological Sources 2. Hunter-Gatherers of the Palaeolithic and Mesolithic Ages 3. The Transition to Food Production: Neolithic,Neolithic Chalcolithic, and Chalcolithic Villages, c. 7000 2000 bce 4. The Harappan Civilization, c. 2600 1900 bce 5. Cultural Transitions: Images from Texts and Archaeology, c. 2000 600 bce 6. Cities, Kings, and Renunciants: North India, c. 600 300 bce 7. Power and Piety: The Maurya Empire, c. 324 187 bce 8. Interaction and Innovation, c. 200 BCE 300 ce 9. Aesthetics and Empire, c. 300 600 ce 10. Emerging Regional Configurations, c. 600 1200 ce Note on diacritics Glossary Further readings References Index Author Bio Upinder Singh is Professor in the Department of History at the University of Delhi. She taught history at St. Stephen s College, Delhi, from 1981 until 2004, after which she joined the faculty of the Department of History at the University of Delhi. Professor Singh s wide range of research interests and expertise include the analysis of ancient and early medieval inscriptions; social and economic history; religious institutions and patrona≥ history of archaeology; and modern history of ancient monuments. Her research papers have been published in various national and international journals. Her published books include: Kings, Brahmanas, and Temples in Orissa: An Epigraphic Study (AD 300 1147) (1994); Ancient Delhi (1999; 2nd edn., 2006); a book for children, Mysteries of the Past: Archaeological Sites in India (2002); The Discovery of Ancient India: Early Archaeologists and the Beginnings of Archaeology (2004); and Delhi: Ancient History (edited, 2006).
"Between the fall of the Roman Empire and the brief, brilliant cultural phenomenon we call the Renaissance lay the Middle Ages-- fully 1,000 years of artistic, philosophical, political, and religious turmoil and treasures. This course offers an interdisciplinary look at medieval society and culture, with an emphasis on literature, the arts, and the tumultuous historical forces at work from A.D. 500 through A.D. 1500. Medieval Europe was the world of cathedrals and universities; pilgrimages and saints; the Black Death; the Vikings; the spread of Islam; the Crusades; and the forging of the Greek, Latin, Old Norse, and ancient Germanic and Celtic tongues into the languages we speak today"--Publisher provided.
Encyclopedia of Society and Culture in the Ancient and Medieval World is an authoritative collection of two engaging and readable reference sets--Encyclopedia of Society and Culture in the Medieval World and Encyclopedia of Society and Culture in the Ancient World. Including information on Western and non-Western cultures and civilizations, this illustrated eight-volume set provides comprehensive coverage of these prolific eras in world history--from prehistory to the fall of Rome and the European Renaissance. The alphabetical entries in these well-researched encyclopedias explore specific topics and allow readers to compare and contrast events in different areas of the world with ease. Primary source documents, sidebars, and black-and-white photographs and maps supplement the text.

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