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From the earliest scratches on stone and bone to the languages of computers and the internet, A History of Writing offers a fascinating investigation into the origin and development of writing throughout the world. Commencing with the first stages of information storage, Fischer focuses on the emergence of complete writing systems in Mesopotamia in the fourth millennium BC. He documents the rise of Phoenician and its effect on the Greek alphabet, generating the many alphabetic scripts of the West. Chinese, Vietnamese, Korean and Japanese writing systems are dealt with in depth, as is writing in pre-Columbian America. Also explored are Western Europe's medieval manuscripts and the history of printing, leading to the innovations in technology and spelling rules of the 19th and 20th centuries.
This book deals chronologically with the history of writing in Japan, a subject which spans a period of 2,000 years, beginning with the transmission of writing from China in about the first or second century AD, and concluding with the use of written Japanese with computers. Topics dealt with include the adoption of Chinese writing and its subsequent adaptation in Japan, forms of writing employed in works such as the "Kojiki" and "Man'yoshu," development of the "kana" syllabaries, evolution of mixed character-"kana" orthography, historical "kana" usage, the rise of literacy during the Edo period, and the main changes that have taken place in written Japanese in the modern period (ca. 1868 onwards). This is the first full-length work in a European language to provide the Western reader with an overall account of the subject concerned, based on extensive examination of both primary and secondary materials.
In this book, leading scholars in the field discuss and analyse the origins of ancient writing.
Trauma and its aftermath pose acute problems for historical representation and understanding. In Writing History, Writing Trauma, Dominick LaCapra critically analyzes attempts by theorists and literary critics to come to terms with trauma and with the crucial role post-traumatic testimonies—notably Holocaust testimonies—assume in thought and in writing. These attempts are addressed in a series of six interlocking essays that adapt psychoanalytic concepts to historical analysis, while employing sociocultural and political critique to elucidate trauma and its aftereffects in culture and in people. This updated edition includes a substantive new preface that reconsiders some of the issues raised in the book.
Volume III of The Oxford History of Historical Writing contains essays by leading scholars on the writing of history globally during the early modern era, from 1400 to 1800. The volume proceeds in geographic order from east to west, beginning in Asia and ending in the Americas. It aims at once to provide a selective but authoritative survey of the field and, where opportunity allows, to provoke cross-cultural comparisons. This is the third of five volumes in a series that explores representations of the past from the beginning of writing to the present day, and from all over the world.
History writing is a form of literature that claims a unique correspondence to the processes of the real world. In this ambitious study, Albert Cook examines the literary dimensions of historiacal writing. He examines two seemingly contradictory constraints on historiography: the truth-claims of texts and the rhetoric of historical discourse. He shows how these constraints combine to enable, rather than prevent, the presentation of meaning in temporal sequences of events. Cook's scope encompasses the historigraphical aspects of the Hebrew Bible and the Gospels, Homer, Thucydides, Tacitus, Gregory of Tours, Einhards, the Anglo-Saxon chronicles, Machiavelli Guicciardini, Gibbon, Ezra Pound, Foucault, Heidegger and Bradel. In the first half of his work he focuses on the practice of individual historians; in the second on particular philosophical or organizational techniques, in scriptural historians philosophical historians, or the self-critical historians of our own time. Though his concerns are systematic his analysis bears upon development questions in the practice of historiography over the past twenty-five hundred years. Thus, the book is not a history of historiography but a historicized perspective of its manifestations in different cultures. Its ambitious scope extends to questions of literary theory and criticism, literary history, rhetoric, semiology and narratology.
From the seventeenth-century attempts to formulate a "history of man" to Freud's Moses and Monotheism, de Certeau examines the West's changing conceptions of the role and nature of history.
Using a variety of sources including chronicles, annals, secular and sacred biographies and monographs on local histories Historical Writing in England by Antonia Gransden offers a comprehensive critical survey of historical writing in England from the mid-sixth century to the early sixteenth century. Based on the study of the sources themselves, these volumes also offer a critical assessment of secondary sources and historiographical development.
A comprehensive evaluation of how to read African history.
The Oxford History of Historical Writing is a five-volume series that explores representations of the past from the beginnings of writing to the present day and from all over the world. Volume I offers essays by leading scholars on the development and history of the major traditions of historical writing, including the ancient Near East, Classical Greece and Rome, and East and South Asia from their origins until c. AD 600. It provides both an authoritative survey of the field and an unrivalled opportunity to make cross-cultural comparisons.
Continuing on to the electronic revolution, Martin's account takes in the changes wrought on writing by computers and electronic systems of storage and communication, and offers surprising insights into the influence these new technologies have had on children born into the computer age. The power of writing to influence and dominate is, indeed, a central theme in this history, as Martin explores the processes by which the written word has gradually imposed its logic on society over four thousand years. The summation of decades of study by one of the world's great scholars on the subject, this fascinating account of writing explains much about the world we inhabit, where we uneasily confer, accept, and resist the power of the written word.
To write a good history essay, you need to have a solid understanding of both technique and history as a discipline. In this new edition, Ian Mabbett carefully takes you through every step of writing a history essay, from reading sources critically and taking notes, to planning and drafting the essay itself.
How do ancient historians pursue their craft? From the evidence of coins, pottery shards, remains of buildings, works of art, and, above all, literary texts?all of which have survived more or less accidentally from antiquity?they fashion works of history. But how exactly do they go about reconstructing and representing the past? How should history be written? These and related questions are the subject of Neville Morley's engaging introduction to the theory and philosophy of history. Intended for students and teachers not only of ancient history but of historiography, the philosophy of history, and classics, his book addresses the implications of debates over methodological and theoretical issues for the practice of ancient history. At the present time, Morley says, students of ancient history are left to come to their own understanding of the field through a process of trial and error. In his view, too many professors regard "questions of theory and methodology... as pointless distractions from the business of actually doing history. Worse, [these questions] may even be perceived as a threat to the subject." Asserting that more attention must be given to fundamental matters, Morley considers such topics as the nature of historical narrative, style in historical writing, the use and abuse of sources, and the reasons for studying history.
Writing the History of Crime investigates the development of historical writing on the subject of crime and its wider place in social and cultural history. It examines long-standing and emerging traditions in history writing, with separate chapters on legal and scientific approaches, as well as on urban, Marxist, gender and empire history. Each chapter then explores these historical approaches in relation to crime, paying particular attention to the relationship between theory and the interpretation of evidence. Rather than a timeline for the historical appearance of ideas about crime or a catalogue of the range of topics that comprise the subject matter, Writing the History of Crime reveals the ideas behind crime as a subject of historical investigation; it looks at how these ideas generate questions that may be asked about the past and the way in which these questions are answered. This is a crucial analysis for anyone interested in the history of crime, the historiography of social history or the art of history writing more broadly.
This work examines the development of narrative historical writing in early eighteenth century England. In addition, it explores the historical dimension of Augustan political ideologies and the character of the Enlightenment in England. Contents: Part One: Tory and Whig History in the Age of Anne: Tory and Whig, Clarendon and Burnet: White Kennett and Laurence Echard; Part Two: The Rise of Whig Historical Writing in the Age of Walpole: Rapin-Thoyras and the Court-Country Historical Debate; The Whig Liberals: John Oldmixon and Daniel Neal; Thomas Salmon: The Tory Rebuttal to Rapin; Part Three: History and Ideology after the Fall of Walpole: Thomas Birch and the Historians; Thomas Carte and the Historical Mind of Jacobitism; James Ralph; William Guthrie; David Hume.
First published in 2006. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
How was history written in Europe and Asia between 400-1400? How was the past understood in religious, social and political terms? And in what ways does the diversity of historical writing in this period mask underlying commonalities in narrating the past? The volume, which assembles 28 contributions from leading historians, tackles these and other questions. Part I provides comprehensive overviews of the development of historical writing in societies that range from the Korean Peninsula to north-west Europe, which together highlight regional and cultural distinctiveness. Part II complements the first part by taking a thematic and comparative approach; it includes essays on genre, warfare, and religion (amongst others) which address common concerns of historians working in this liminal period before the globalizing forces of the early modern world.

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