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This textbook on algebraic topology updates a popular textbook from the golden era of the Moscow school of I. M. Gelfand. The first English translation, done many decades ago, remains very much in demand, although it has been long out-of-print and is difficult to obtain. Therefore, this updated English edition will be much welcomed by the mathematical community. Distinctive features of this book include: a concise but fully rigorous presentation, supplemented by a plethora of illustrations of a high technical and artistic caliber; a huge number of nontrivial examples and computations done in detail; a deeper and broader treatment of topics in comparison to most beginning books on algebraic topology; an extensive, and very concrete, treatment of the machinery of spectral sequences. The second edition contains an entirely new chapter on K-theory and the Riemann-Roch theorem (after Hirzebruch and Grothendieck).
The authors present introductory material in algebraic topology from a novel point of view in using a homotopy-theoretic approach. This carefully written book can be read by any student who knows some topology, providing a useful method to quickly learn this novel homotopy-theoretic point of view of algebraic topology.
This IMA Volume in Mathematics and its Applications NONSMOOTH ANALYSIS AND GEOMETRIC METHODS IN DETERMINISTIC OPTIMAL CONTROL is based on the proceedings of a workshop that was an integral part of the 1992-93 IMA program on "Control Theory. " The purpose of this workshop was to concentrate on powerful mathematical techniques that have been de veloped in deterministic optimal control theory after the basic foundations of the theory (existence theorems, maximum principle, dynamic program ming, sufficiency theorems for sufficiently smooth fields of extremals) were laid out in the 1960s. These advanced techniques make it possible to derive much more detailed information about the structure of solutions than could be obtained in the past, and they support new algorithmic approaches to the calculation of such solutions. We thank Boris S. Mordukhovich and Hector J. Sussmann for organiz ing the workshop and editing the proceedings. We also take this oppor tunity to thank the National Science Foundation and the Army Research Office, whose financial support made the workshop possible. A vner Friedman Willard Miller, Jr. v PREFACE This volume contains the proceedings of the workshop on Nonsmooth Analysis and Geometric Methods in Deterministic Optimal Control held at the Institute for Mathematics and its Applications on February 8-17, 1993 during a special year devoted to Control Theory and its Applications. The workshop-whose organizing committee consisted of V. J urdjevic, B. S. Mordukhovich, R. T. Rockafellar, and H. J.
This book is an introduction to the simple math patterns used to describe fundamental, stable, spectral-orbital physical systems (represented as discrete hyperbolic shapes). The containment set has many dimensions, and these dimensions possess macroscopic geometric properties (which are discrete hyperbolic shapes). Thus, it is a description that transcends the idea of materialism (i.e., it is higher-dimensional), and it can also be used to model a life-form as a unified, high-dimension, geometric construct, which generates its own energy and which has a natural structure for memory, where this construct is made in relation to the main property of the description being the spectral properties of both material systems and of the metric-spaces that contain the material systems, where material is simply a lower dimension metric-space and where both material components and metric-spaces are in resonance with the containing space.
In recent years topology has firmly established itself as an important part of the physicist's mathematical arsenal. Topology has profound relevance to quantum field theory-for example, topological nontrivial solutions of the classical equa tions of motion (solitons and instantons) allow the physicist to leave the frame work of perturbation theory. The significance of topology has increased even further with the development of string theory, which uses very sharp topologi cal methods-both in the study of strings, and in the pursuit of the transition to four-dimensional field theories by means of spontaneous compactification. Im portant applications of topology also occur in other areas of physics: the study of defects in condensed media, of singularities in the excitation spectrum of crystals, of the quantum Hall effect, and so on. Nowadays, a working knowledge of the basic concepts of topology is essential to quantum field theorists; there is no doubt that tomorrow this will also be true for specialists in many other areas of theoretical physics. The amount of topological information used in the physics literature is very large. Most common is homotopy theory. But other subjects also play an important role: homology theory, fibration theory (and characteristic classes in particular), and also branches of mathematics that are not directly a part of topology, but which use topological methods in an essential way: for example, the theory of indices of elliptic operators and the theory of complex manifolds.
To the Teacher. This book is designed to introduce a student to some of the important ideas of algebraic topology by emphasizing the re lations of these ideas with other areas of mathematics. Rather than choosing one point of view of modem topology (homotopy theory, simplicial complexes, singular theory, axiomatic homology, differ ential topology, etc.), we concentrate our attention on concrete prob lems in low dimensions, introducing only as much algebraic machin ery as necessary for the problems we meet. This makes it possible to see a wider variety of important features of the subject than is usual in a beginning text. The book is designed for students of mathematics or science who are not aiming to become practicing algebraic topol ogists-without, we hope, discouraging budding topologists. We also feel that this approach is in better harmony with the historical devel opment of the subject. What would we like a student to know after a first course in to pology (assuming we reject the answer: half of what one would like the student to know after a second course in topology)? Our answers to this have guided the choice of material, which includes: under standing the relation between homology and integration, first on plane domains, later on Riemann surfaces and in higher dimensions; wind ing numbers and degrees of mappings, fixed-point theorems; appli cations such as the Jordan curve theorem, invariance of domain; in dices of vector fields and Euler characteristics; fundamental groups
The papers collected in this volume are contributions to the 43rd session of the Seminaire ́ de mathematiques ́ superieures ́ (SMS) on “Morse Theoretic Methods in Nonlinear Analysis and Symplectic Topology.” This session took place at the Universite ́ de Montreal ́ in July 2004 and was a NATO Advanced Study Institute (ASI). The aim of the ASI was to bring together young researchers from various parts of the world and to present to them some of the most signi cant recent advances in these areas. More than 77 mathematicians from 17 countries followed the 12 series of lectures and participated in the lively exchange of ideas. The lectures covered an ample spectrum of subjects which are re ected in the present volume: Morse theory and related techniques in in nite dim- sional spaces, Floer theory and its recent extensions and generalizations, Morse and Floer theory in relation to string topology, generating functions, structure of the group of Hamiltonian di?eomorphisms and related dynamical problems, applications to robotics and many others. We thank all our main speakers for their stimulating lectures and all p- ticipants for creating a friendly atmosphere during the meeting. We also thank Ms. Diane Belanger ́ , our administrative assistant, for her help with the organi- tion and Mr. Andre ́ Montpetit, our technical editor, for his help in the preparation of the volume.
This book provides an introduction to modern homotopy theory through the lens of higher categories after Joyal and Lurie, giving access to methods used at the forefront of research in algebraic topology and algebraic geometry in the twenty-first century. The text starts from scratch - revisiting results from classical homotopy theory such as Serre's long exact sequence, Quillen's theorems A and B, Grothendieck's smooth/proper base change formulas, and the construction of the Kan–Quillen model structure on simplicial sets - and develops an alternative to a significant part of Lurie's definitive reference Higher Topos Theory, with new constructions and proofs, in particular, the Yoneda Lemma and Kan extensions. The strong emphasis on homotopical algebra provides clear insights into classical constructions such as calculus of fractions, homotopy limits and derived functors. For graduate students and researchers from neighbouring fields, this book is a user-friendly guide to advanced tools that the theory provides for application.
Beginning Topology is designed to give undergraduate students a broad notion of the scope of topology in areas of point-set, geometric, combinatorial, differential, and algebraic topology, including an introduction to knot theory. A primary goal is to expose students to some recent research and to get them actively involved in learning. Exercises and open-ended projects are placed throughout the text, making it adaptable to seminar-style classes. The book starts with a chapter introducing the basic concepts of point-set topology, with examples chosen to captivate students' imaginations while illustrating the need for rigor. Most of the material in this and the next two chapters is essential for the remainder of the book. One can then choose from chapters on map coloring, vector fields on surfaces, the fundamental group, and knot theory. A solid foundation in calculus is necessary, with some differential equations and basic group theory helpful in a couple of chapters. Topics are chosen to appeal to a wide variety of students: primarily upper-level math majors, but also a few freshmen and sophomores as well as graduate students from physics, economics, and computer science. All students will benefit from seeing the interaction of topology with other fields of mathematics and science; some will be motivated to continue with a more in-depth, rigorous study of topology.
This book is designed for graduate students to acquire knowledge of dimension theory, ANR theory (theory of retracts), and related topics. These two theories are connected with various fields in geometric topology and in general topology as well. Hence, for students who wish to research subjects in general and geometric topology, understanding these theories will be valuable. Many proofs are illustrated by figures or diagrams, making it easier to understand the ideas of those proofs. Although exercises as such are not included, some results are given with only a sketch of their proofs. Completing the proofs in detail provides good exercise and training for graduate students and will be useful in graduate classes or seminars. Researchers should also find this book very helpful, because it contains many subjects that are not presented in usual textbooks, e.g., dim X × I = dim X + 1 for a metrizable space X; the difference between the small and large inductive dimensions; a hereditarily infinite-dimensional space; the ANR-ness of locally contractible countable-dimensional metrizable spaces; an infinite-dimensional space with finite cohomological dimension; a dimension raising cell-like map; and a non-AR metric linear space. The final chapter enables students to understand how deeply related the two theories are. Simplicial complexes are very useful in topology and are indispensable for studying the theories of both dimension and ANRs. There are many textbooks from which some knowledge of these subjects can be obtained, but no textbook discusses non-locally finite simplicial complexes in detail. So, when we encounter them, we have to refer to the original papers. For instance, J.H.C. Whitehead's theorem on small subdivisions is very important, but its proof cannot be found in any textbook. The homotopy type of simplicial complexes is discussed in textbooks on algebraic topology using CW complexes, but geometrical arguments using simplicial complexes are rather easy.
Two top experts in topology, O.Ya. Viro and D.B. Fuchs, give an up-to-date account of research in central areas of topology and the theory of Lie groups. They cover homotopy, homology and cohomology as well as the theory of manifolds, Lie groups, Grassmanians and low-dimensional manifolds. Their book will be used by graduate students and researchers in mathematics and mathematical physics.
Many of the modern variational problems in topology arise in different but overlapping fields of scientific study: mechanics, physics and mathematics. In this work, Professor Fomenko offers a concise and clean explanation of some of these problems (both solved and unsolved), using current methods and analytical topology. The author's skillful exposition gives an unusual motivation to the theory expounded, and his work is recommended reading for specialists and nonspecialists alike, involved in the fields of physics and mathematics at both undergraduate and graduate levels.
Algebraic topology is a basic part of modern mathematics, and some knowledge of this area is indispensable for any advanced work relating to geometry, including topology itself, differential geometry, algebraic geometry, and Lie groups. This book provides a detailed treatment of algebraic topology both for teachers of the subject and for advanced graduate students in mathematics either specializing in this area or continuing on to other fields. J. Peter May's approach reflects the enormous internal developments within algebraic topology over the past several decades, most of which are largely unknown to mathematicians in other fields. But he also retains the classical presentations of various topics where appropriate. Most chapters end with problems that further explore and refine the concepts presented. The final four chapters provide sketches of substantial areas of algebraic topology that are normally omitted from introductory texts, and the book concludes with a list of suggested readings for those interested in delving further into the field.
Topology is a relatively young and very important branch of mathematics, which studies the properties of objects that are preserved through deformations, twistings, and stretchings. This book deals with the topology of curves and surfaces as well as with the fundamental concepts of homotopy and homology, and does this in a lively and well-motivated way. This book is well suited for readers who are interested in finding out what topology is all about.
Algebraic and Differential Topology presents in a clear, concise, and detailed manner the fundamentals of homology theory. It first defines the concept of a complex and its Betti groups, then discusses the topolgoical invariance of a Betti group. The book next presents various applications of homology theory, such as mapping of polyhedrons onto other polyhedrons as well as onto themselves. The third volume in L.S. Pontryagin's Selected Works, this book provides as many insights into algebraic topology for today's mathematician as it did when the author was making his initial endeavors into this field.
This book describes the construction and the properties of CW-complexes. These spaces are important because firstly they are the correct framework for homotopy theory, and secondly most spaces that arise in pure mathematics are of this type. The authors discuss the foundations and also developments, for example, the theory of finite CW-complexes, CW-complexes in relation to the theory of fibrations, and Milnor's work on spaces of the type of CW-complexes. They establish very clearly the relationship between CW-complexes and the theory of simplicial complexes, which is developed in great detail. Exercises are provided throughout the book; some are straightforward, others extend the text in a non-trivial way. For the latter; further reference is given for their solution. Each chapter ends with a section sketching the historical development. An appendix gives basic results from topology, homology and homotopy theory. These features will aid graduate students, who can use the work as a course text. As a contemporary reference work it will be essential reading for the more specialized workers in algebraic topology and homotopy theory.

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