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Among the most revered and beloved artworks in China are ceramics—sculptures and vessels that have been utilized to embellish tombs, homes, and studies, to drink tea and wine, and to convey social and cultural meanings such as good wishes and religious beliefs. Since the eighth century, Chinese ceramics, particularly porcelain, have played an influential role around the world as trade introduced their beauty and surpassing craft to countless artists in Europe, America, and elsewhere. Spanning five millennia, the Metropolitan Museum’s collection of Chinese ceramics represents a great diversity of materials, shapes, and subjects. The remarkable selections presented in this volume, which include both familiar examples and unusual ones, will acquaint readers with the prodigious accomplishments of Chinese ceramicists from Neolithic times to the modern era. As with previous books in the How to Read series, How to Read Chinese Ceramics elucidates the works to encourage deeper understanding and appreciation of the meaning of individual pieces and the culture in which they were created. From exquisite jars, bowls, bottles, and dishes to the elegantly sculpted Chan Patriarch Bodhidharma and the gorgeous Vase with Flowers of the Four Seasons, How to Read Chinese Ceramics is a captivating introduction to one of the greatest artistic traditions in Asian culture.
This catalogue, published annually by The Metropolitan Museum of Art, announces its publications for that year. It also features notable backlist titles and provide a complete list of books available in print at the time of publication.
" ... Looks at the whole history of chinese pottery from the point of view of the techniques used by potters and so traces how their craft evolved from the earliest unglazed earthenware pots to highly sophisticated porcelain. she describes the glazes, kilns, clays and working methods of the Chinese potters and makes it clear how certain types of ware could only be produced as the result og particular technological developments. Much of this material is new and the authos has made full use of all the recent archaeological reports that have emerged from China. Her clear technical descriptions are easy to follow and anyone with a practical interest in making pots will learn much from them. The specialist will gain a far better understanding of the history of his subject ..."--Back cover.
In this major work on Oriental ceramics and glazes, a leading authority on Far Eastern pottery traces the development of Chinese glazes and glazing techniques from antiquity to the modern era. Nigel Wood describes how glazes were made, provides an analysis of their composition, and shows how they can be duplicated today with common raw materials available in the West. The book is lavishly illustrated, with nearly three hundred photographs, one hundred in full color. These depict examples of the Chinese arts as found in pottery ranging from simple earthenware jars excavated at Neolithic sites to exquisitely designed dishes found in imperial tombs. They also show examples of modern Western ware that employ these remarkable glazing techniques.
A compelling examination of the ultimate global commodity, blue and white porcelain, from kiln to consumers across the globe.
Chinese Antiquities: An Introduction to the Art Market provides an essential guide to the growing market for Chinese antiquities, encompassing all sectors of the market, from Classical Chinese paintings and calligraphy to ceramics, jade, bronze and ritual sculpture. Aimed at current and aspiring collectors, investors and galleries interested in Chinese antiquities, the book sets out to demystify the process of buying and selling in the Asian context, highlighting Asia-specific issues that market-players might encounter and making this category of art more accessible to newcomers to the market.
This book follows Chinese porcelain through the commodity chain, from its production in China to trade with Spanish Merchants in Manila, and to its eventual adoption by colonial society in Mexico. As trade connections increased in the early modern period, porcelain became an immensely popular and global product. This study focuses on one of the most exported objects, the guan. It shows how this porcelain jar was produced, made accessible across vast distances and how designs were borrowed and transformed into new creations within different artistic cultures. While people had increased access to global markets and products, this book argues that this new connectivity could engender more local outlooks and even heightened isolation in some places. It looks beyond the guan to the broader context of transpacific trade during this period, highlighting the importance and impact of Asian commodities in Spanish America.

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