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Over 2,000 years of settlement give London its unique architectural heritage. Unlike Haussmann’s Paris, neither monarch nor politician imposed their will; private ownership and enterprise shaped the city and defined its parts. Elegant West End squares and crescents hallmark the Classical townscape that emerged between 1600 and 1830, but medieval, Tudor and Victorian enclaves identified by occupation, class or guild make their own design statement, notably in the City and East End. From its renewal after the Great Fire of 1666 as a centre of commerce, culture, finance and as a railway hub, the seat of power and law, How to Read London reveals through the built environment how London’s domestic, civic and commercial landscape has evolved and adapted from imperial capital to global city.
How to Read Buildings is a practical primer to looking at architecture and all the elements that are included in buildings, from cornices and friezes to columns and porticos - all facets of buildings are included. Each chapter takes an architectural element and looks at its variety across various historical periods and geographical locations. Examples are shown through dozens of fine engravings with extended captions, creating a dip-in read and an effective I-Spy guide. Additional sections look at the clues offerred by history, geography and religion (with a timeline showing how and where architectural elements have been introduced), and at the significance of the ornaments.
How to Read Houses is an insider's guide to recognising and appreciating the diversity of domestic architecture that reflects the location, the fashion and the technological savoir-faire of the age - from Tudor timber-frames to the truly unconventional. Houses are arranged by period and style, including Renaissance, Neoclassical, Arts and Crafts, Modernist and many more besides. Featured houses range from Sutton House in London to Port Sunlight in Merseyside; from St Fagans in Cardiff to Hill House in Glasgow. Compact enough to travel with you, yet comprehensive enough to provide real answers, with real examples, this handy reference guide: - provides an understanding of the architectural vocabulary along with the visual clues that identify any house style and its historical context - enhances the appreciation of visits to landmark houses and lays the foundations for an architectural exploration of your own home or area - explores the main architectural styles, as well as the materials and components of a house through beautifully rendered illustrations, photographs of classic examples and the words of a friendly expert.
Throughout history, the story of the skyscraper has been defined by our desire for ascendance—politically, militarily, economically, religiously, culturally, and, of course, physically. These spectacular superstructures epitomise more than architectural aspiration, they excite the imagination and inspire awe. The scope of the book is deliberately broad with a thematic first section and a geographical second section. Conceptual chapters, introduce the origins of our desire to build high and explore the skyscraper’s role in fuelling our imaginations through different modes of cultural expression. How To Read Skyscrapers offers a deep and rich understanding of the skyscraper by providing a comprehensive account of this unique and captivating building-type, from its origins in myth and legend to its future potential in satisfying humankind’s needs and aspirations.
The Victorians built tens of thousands of churches in the hundred years between 1800 and 1900. Wherever you might be in the English-speaking world, you will be close to a Victorian built or remodelled ecclesiastical building. Contemporary experience of church buildings is almost entirely down to the zeal of Victorians such as John Henry Newman, Samuel Wilberforce and Augustus Pugin, and their ideas about the role of architecture in our spiritual life and well-being. In Unlocking the Church, William Whyte explores a forgotten revolution in social and architectural history and in the history of the Church. He details the architectural and theological debates of the day, explaining how the Tractarians of Oxford and the Ecclesiologists of Cambridge were embroiled in the aesthetics of architecture, and how the Victorians profoundly changed the ways in which buildings were understood and experienced. No longer mere receptacles for worship, churches became active agents in their own rights, capable of conveying theological ideas and designed to shape people's emotions. These church buildings are now a challenge: their maintenance, repair or repurposing are pressing problems for parishes in age of declining attendance and dwindling funds. By understanding their past, unlocking the secrets of their space, there might be answers in how to deal with the legacy of the Victorians now and into the future.
Filled with insightful analysis and compelling arguments, this book considers the influence of sports on popular culture and spotlights the fascinating ways in which sports culture and American culture intersect.
How to Read Bridges is a practical introduction to looking at the structure and purpose of bridges. It is a guide to reading the structural clues embedded in every bridge that allows their variety and ingenuity to be better appreciated. Small enough to carry in your pocket and serious enough to provide real answers, this comprehensive guide: - analyses and explores all types of bridges from around the world from the first millennium to the present day. - explores fundamental concepts of bridge design, key materials and engineering techniques. - provides an accessible visual guide with intelligent text, using detailed illustrations and cross-sections of technical features.

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