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NATIONAL BESTSELLER The three Great Premises of Idiot America: · Any theory is valid if it sells books, soaks up ratings, or otherwise moves units · Anything can be true if someone says it loudly enough · Fact is that which enough people believe. Truth is determined by how fervently they believe it With his trademark wit and insight, veteran journalist Charles Pierce delivers a gut-wrenching, side-splitting lament about the glorification of ignorance in the United States. Pierce asks how a country founded on intellectual curiosity has somehow deteriorated into a nation of simpletons more apt to vote for an American Idol contestant than a presidential candidate. But his thunderous denunciation is also a secret call to action, as he hopes that somehow, being intelligent will stop being a stigma, and that pinheads will once again be pitied, not celebrated. Erudite and razor-sharp, Idiot America is at once an invigorating history lesson, a cutting cultural critique, and a bullish appeal to our smarter selves. From the Trade Paperback edition.
You're no idiot, of course. You know that Samuel Clemens had a better-known pen name, Moby Dick is a famous whale, and the Raven only said,"Nevermore." But when it comes to understanding the great works of Mark Twain, Herman Melville, and Edgar Allan Poe, you'd rather rent the videos than head to your local library. Don't tear up your library card yet! The Complete Idiot's Guide® to American Literature teaches you all about the rich tradition of American prose and poetry, so you can fully appreciate its magnificent diversity.
This volume explores some of the popular myths of the modern United States and discusses their role in the culture and the values they reflect. Readers are introduced to American frontier heroes, both real and imaginary, such as Davy Crockett and Paul Bunyon. The book covers details about legendary ghost ships, haunted houses, pirate treasure, monsters, and lost cities, and relates these stories to the experiences and values of American culture.
The compact history of a giant country. American history is one of those subjects that students frequently labor over and can seem like a random collection of names, dates, and events. Understood as a collective biography and free of the cheerleading found in many text books, the fully updated fifth edition of The Complete Idiot's Guide® to American History explains the changing tides in America's most pivotal periods. ? From a seasoned author and researcher ? The most current and comprehensive series title on American history ? Heightened interest right now in the question of how America got where we are - a question that can only be answered by an understanding of history
This book, The State of the American Mind: Stupor and Pathetic Docility Volume One begins to unravel some of the most obvious, perplexing, embarrassing and enduring problems and contradictions of American history and sociology, viz., how could the American revolution that started with the most ringing and most inspiring Declarations of human equality in world history end up establishing the most vicious, exploitative society the world ever knew Black chattel slavery and only ten percent white enfranchisement, etc. Further, how could men of such great wisdom and intellect like George Washington, James Madison, Thomas Jefferson, and others who were Enlightenment scholars and clearly knew that slavery was despicable and evil, because they had variously experienced white servitude and slavery themselves, collude to establish and institutionalize the horrible system of Negro chattel slavery in America; and also disenfranchised over 90 percent of people of their own race actions that racism could not explain. The structural/institutional slavery system they established, and the resultant consequent racism hobbles America today as it did in the past, and forced Eric Holder, the Attorney General to declare that, America is a nation of cowards, when it comes to race discussions. Thus, this book starts with serious critical discussions of race in America and reveals what no textbook has ever done, viz., that most early American whites and Blacks were slaves an uncomfortable fact that would shock most Americans because it contradicts the orthodoxy or the dominant narrative that only Blacks were brought here in chains. Further, the book also shows the year Black slavery started something almost, all textbooks got wrong. It also shows who, was the fi rst Black slave in America something no textbook ever mentions. It also shows when and how racism started in America and many other very sensitive and embarrassing but necessary issues that America avoids but must be frankly discussed for America to move forward. This book therefore shatters the two dominant themes of Americas history and sociology that Blacks were brought into America in chains as slaves while whites came to America in search of freedom, as Harvard educated President Obama famously told us in his race speech. Thus, the crowning lesson of this book, in addition to discussing some critical policy issues like education, health care, etc., is that it discovers the centripetal force of the American society that eluded contemporary Americans because American bosses have laboriously concealed the facts from the public the scary but clearly healthy uniting fact that most Americans are united by their common ancestry, their universal history and experience of servitude, bond-indentures and slavery. Nothing is more universal, more common and more shared in American history and sociology than the fact that most of our ancestors, black and white, were servants, bond-indentures and slaves who were dominated and super-exploited by few overlords. Colonial America was the preferred dumping ground for British, outcasts, rejects, criminals, masterless class, vagabonds, bond-indentures, slaves, etc., until 1776 when Australia replaced America as the British dump for its rejects and surplus citizens. Thus, that America was a nation founded by British rejects and losers is inherently more rational than the prevailing orthodoxy or the Obama theory of Americas founders that they were great honorable men who journeyed across the ocean for freedom because of the obvious reason that good, powerful achieving citizens do not normally emigrate to new uncharted lands.
Part travelogue and part memoire, John S. Dingas newest book is a sequel to Navigating the Contradictions of America and explores disparities between Americas past and present, from the perspective of an immigrant. Featuring characters both real and fictional, Dinga shares his observations about the realities of making a new life in a new country, with an occasional flashback to the former home. The desire to immigrate to America is one shared by people all over the world, people who are often unaware of what it takes to thrive in a competitive, capitalist world where nothing is the same as before. Settling down in a new environment and navigating the politics and stresses of finding a job are just two of the aspects of culture shock a new immigrant will face. Expectations and responsibilities from those back home also add to the new immigrants challenges, and Dinga offers his suggestions on how to thrive under those stresses as well. He speaks not only to the potential immigrant but to those officials in power on either side of the process as well. Learning to make the right choices when presented with so many options is another life lesson addressed. The American society, freedoms, choices, and government are envied in many corners of the world, and Dinga explores how that perception influences the decision to start the journey. People need to know that living in America has its challengeschallenges not often imagined when the desire to immigrate pushes them to cross deserts, oceans, and unfriendly skies.
Three Latin American writers quote, dissect and review this character in a cultural critique that combines analysis with humor and a relentless self-criticism.

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