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George Theriault has been flying in northern Canada since the summer of 1934. When he established his own air service in in 1954, his skills as a bush pilot and sportsman made him one of the most popular outfitters in northern Ontario. This series of stories chronicles his many adventures from Alaska to Labrador, including seal and whale hunting with native people. .
Explore the influence of religion on the privacy rights of U. S. citizens in this controversial new book! Here is a compelling and controversial new book that explores the enormous political influence that some religious groups currently wield. God’s Country focuses particularly on the issue of personal privacy rights and the strategies and rhetoric these religious groups are using to diminish those rights among select segments of society. Author Sandy Rapp, a grassroots activist, shares her experiences in one-on-one debates with religious fundamentalists who have been on opposite sides of the social issues for which she has so passionately fought in recent years. Topics in this fascinating book include: privacy rights individual’s rights as stated in the constitution AIDS and homophobia the abortion choice global population crisis gay and lesbian reporductive rights effective strategies for lobbying Sandy Rapp traces the patriarchal premises which underlie the twentieth-century crusade against homosexuality. She integrates various personal and professional perspectives and provides a challenging and comprehensive examination of the physical and psychological devastation inflicted upon women, lesbians, and gay men due to religious and political control over such personal decisions as the expression of one’s sexuality, the use of birth control, the choice of abortion, and privacy rights. God’s Country poses some provocative questions that are certain to spark debate among enlightened religious professionals, professors, and students of political science, government, women’s history, human sexuality, and religion: Does the government have the right to impose mandatory childbirth upon women? Should a gay or lesbian person’s sexual orientation weaken his/her civil rights? Can, in a free society, the religious beliefs of one denomination or group be imposed on all citizens? If freedom for all is to upheld in the United States, shouldn’t the separation of church and state be maintained?
The dramatic desert landscapes of the Big Bend country along the Texas-Mexico border reminded historian Walter Prescott Webb of "an earth-wreck in which a great section of country was shaken down, turned over, blown up, and set on fire." By contrast, naturalist Aldo Leopold considered the region a mountainous paradise in which even the wild Mexican parrots had no greater concern than "whether this new day which creeps slowly over the canyons is bluer or golder than its predecessors, or less so." Whether it impresses people as God's country or as the devil's playground, the Big Bend typically evokes strong responses from almost everyone who lives or visits there. In this anthology of nature writing, Barney Nelson gathers nearly sixty literary perspectives on the landscape and life of the Big Bend region, broadly defined as Trans-Pecos Texas and northern Chihuahua, Mexico. In addition to Leopold and Webb, the collection includes such well-known writers as Edward Abbey, Mary Austin, Roy Bedichek, and Frederick Olmsted, as well as a wide range of voices that includes explorers, trappers, cowboys, ranch wives, curanderos, college presidents, scientists, locals, tourists, historians, avisadores, and waitresses. Following a personal introduction by Barney Nelson, the pieces are grouped thematically to highlight the distinctive ways in which writers have responded to the Big Bend.
The mythology of "gifted land" is strong in the Park Service, but some of our greatest parks were "gifted" by people who had little if any choice in the matter. Places like the Grand Canyon's south rim and Glacier had to be bought, finagled, borrowed -- or taken by force -- when Indian occupants and owners resisted the call to contribute to the public welfare. The story of national parks and Indians is, depending on perspective, a costly triumph of the public interest, or a bitter betrayal of America's native people.In Indian Country, God's Country historian Philip Burnham traces the complex relationship between Native Americans and the national parks, relating how Indians were removed, relocated, or otherwise kept at arm's length from lands that became some of our nation's most hallowed ground. Burnham focuses on five parks: Glacier, the Badlands, Mesa Verde, the Grand Canyon, and Death Valley. Based on archival research and extensive personal visits and interviews, he examines the beginnings of the national park system and early years of the National Park Service, along with later Congressional initiatives to mainstream American Indians and expand and refurbish the parks. The final chapters visit the parks as they are today, presenting the thoughts and insights of superintendents and rangers, tribal officials and archaeologists, ranchers, community leaders, curators, and elders. Burnham reports on hard-won compromises that have given tribes more autonomy and greater cultural recognition in recent years, while highlighting stubborn conflicts that continue to mark relations between tribes and the parks.Indian Country, God's Country offers a compelling -- and until now untold -- story that illustrates the changing role of the national parks in American society, the deep ties of Native Americans to the land, and the complicated mix of commerce, tourism, and environmental preservation that characterize the parks system. Anyone interested in Native American culture and history, the history of the American West, the national park system, or environmental history will find it a fascinating and engaging work.

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