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This book is about the relationship between firm dynamics, innovation and globalization, the processes that are essential for long term economic growth and welfare creation. This volume deals with these three issues in three sections titled respectively: entrepreneurship, new firm formation and growth; productivity-innovation-growthnexus; globalization, multinational firms and producers’ dynamics. The book presents new studies written by distinguished researchers in the field, who use state-of-the-art methodologies and extensive sources of firm- and plant-level longitudinal data to analyze and understand these major economic issues facing modern economies. In the first section, the book proposes two comprehensive introductory surveys which explore in detail the underpinnings of entrepreneurship, new firm formation and growth in advanced and developing countries. The second fundamental issue, productivity-innovation and firm dynamics, is approached by examining key drivers of selection mechanisms such as size, scale elasticity, innovative efforts, financial fragility of the firms, barriers to entry and exit, capital and financial market distortions, institutional inefficiencies and other market imperfections which affect the ability of firms to expand or enter. The third section examines differences, linkages and intertwined evolution of foreign and domestic firms in their dynamics of survival and growth in different institutional contexts and periods. Each chapter includes a detailed discussion of the implications of the respective analyses for enterprise policy. In a concluding chapter the overall implications for enterprise policy of the analyses presented in the different chapters are drawn by the Editors. This approach ensures that the book is integrated around a coherent central theme in comprehensive framework. The book responds to a growing concern among scholars, professionals, and policy makers over the recent decades about firm ability to survive and compete in a context of increasing globalization and international competition. The approach adopted is both theoretical and empirical with consideration of paradigmatic case studies in Europe, Africa and Asia, providing new evidence on developed, developing and transition economies in a comparative perspective. The cases selected represent different levels of development, different firms strategies and paths, with distinct outcomes. The book is an essential reading for scholars and students concerned with industry development, public policy and globalization, as well as to all those involved professionally in such issues.
Economic globalization is the process of increased integration among nations, characterized and fostered by three elements of international trade- goods and services, international capital flows, and international migration. In recent decades, international economic integration has increased both in depth (more pronounced bilateral connections) and in breadth (connections have become more commonplace), thus, the global economy has become increasingly integrated. Societies receive tremendous net benefits from economic globalization, however, accessing these benefits may be limited by cross-societal cultural differences. This book examines cultural differences as a potential impediment to economic integration. Relying on rigorous statistical and econometric techniques, the analyses indicate that higher transaction costs, due to greater cultural distance, inhibit both the volume of trade flows and the successful completion of trade deals. Cultural distance appears to reduce foreign direct investment, as well as divert investment to less culturally-distant destinations. This book finds a negative relationship between migration flows and cultural distance. It considers the common criticism that repeated and intensified integration diminishes cultural differences, resulting in cultural homogeneity. This book offers the first comprehensive examination of the relationships between cross-societal cultural differences and economic globalization. It will be of great interest to scholars and students who study globalization, international economics, and cultural studies.
Corruption is increasingly placed on top of the agenda of national governments and supra national institutions, such as the OECD, UN or the World Bank. A necessary condition for promoting sustainable economic growth is the pre-existence of a stable political system which is able to control corruption. Corruption, however, is a very complex issue, associated with institutional and cultural specificities, personality traits related to individualistic values, and criminal personalities. In this book the social, political and economic realities that prevail in particular settings are viewed from an interdisciplinary, multidimensional, and a multi country perspective. This book is divided into three parts. The first part presents a comprehensive, theoretical and empirical framework of corruption with an overview of literature on economic growth and corruption. Part two, encompasses the in-depth analysis of several countries, ranging from middle corrupted contexts like Portugal, to highly corrupted countries including Serbia, Russia, Thailand and China- the latter viewed from the perspective of firms from a very low corruption country such as Finland. The final part explores the prevention and control of corruption, looking at the public sector in Thailand and fighting corruption with different strategies. This volume is of the interest of those who study international economics, development economics or organised crime.
Contemporary capitalistic systems have been undergoing profound transformations determined by the transition towards the so-called knowledge based economy, i.e. a competitive system based on the capabilities firms have to create, use and circulate knowledge. These transformations concern both the characteristics of productive and innovative processes, and the resources used in these activities. This book captures these changes, where traditional R&D investments undertaken internally by firms are increasingly and strategically complemented by external sources of innovation and new knowledge. Collaborations between firms, and between firms and other organizations, as well as the mobility of human capital, are strategic processes in order to share and circulate knowledge and competencies. They are also key determinants in the creation of new knowledge and innovation, and ultimately in growth dynamics. The circulation and distribution of knowledge is now a key input in the production of knowledge. Knowledge and innovation are understood as the result of collective and interactive processes at the system level, and less at the micro level. In other words, new knowledge production is less and less the result of individualistic behaviours of the firms and much more the effect of explicit and pro-active interactions and transactions put in place by local networks of innovators. In this perspective, economic space is much more defined by the quality of the interactions among actors rather than by their mere technological, sectoral or geographical proximity. This book brings together new conceptual and empirical contributions and blends the analysis of the technological and geographical spaces in which innovation and knowledge are produced.
In the new global economy, more countries have opened up to international competition and rapid capital flows. However, in the triad the process of globalization is rather asymmetric. With a rising role of multinational companies there are favorable prospects for higher global growth and economic catching-up, respectively. Theoretical analysis suggests key ingredients of sustained growth, but there is also a new concept of a long-term equilibrium income gap in which convergence is rather unlikely. The analysis also picks up European and US labor market issues in the context of economic globalization and raises the question of which EU policies in the field of labor market reform and of innovation policies are adequate.
Economic globalization has intensified since the 1980s and created faster channels of international interdependence and an accelerating technology race. In this new asymmetric world economy the EU is facing a dynamic and flexible US system which takes advantage of the global quest for foreign direct investment. Innovation policies in the EU - in particular in Germany - are found to be rather inadequate. There are also new theoretical challenges where a "structural macro model" and a Schumpetrian model of innovation and full employment are presented as new approaches. Besides theoretical challenges the increasing global dynamics raise new problems of international policy coordination which could lead to unsustainable economic globalization.
Cross-border flows of goods, services, capital, knowledge, and ideas have substantially increased. This book focuses on how the interface between firm-specific advantages, liability of foreignness, and location-specific advantages are spelled out in the more global world.

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