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This reader provides both theoretical perspectives and practical tools for analysing and understanding how ELT classroom curricula can be analysed, developed and evaluated. The commissioned and classic texts place curriculum change in a philosophical framework and also explore the political and institutional considerations. A series of case studies are provided to highlight both the role of the teacher in curriculum innovation and various processes of planning and implementation. The final section deals with evaluating curriculum and syllabus change.
English language teaching methods and language learning styles have changed dramatically over the past decade in Asia and the surrounding regions. Huge efforts are being made by teachers from the K-12 system, as well as at the tertiary level, to move away from the traditional Grammar-Translation Method towards more communicative approaches to teaching and learning, including the use of project – and task-based learning and technology-enhanced language learning, just to name a few of the more frequently used methodologies. In this book, the authors shed light on the changes in ELT in Asia and the region over the past 10 years or so as seen in the wider context of language policy, which puts greater value on the acquisition of English and the new directions in learner-centered classrooms which encourage student autonomy and voice and place students as active decision-makers in the learning process.With the title of “Departing from Tradition: Innovations in English Language Teaching and Learning”, this book showcases some of the innovations in ELT that are currently happening in this rapidly growing field. Given the growing importance of English and the enormous energy and enthusiasm in the region for learning the language in both formal and informal contexts, ELT will continue to flourish. This volume will offer insights into the tremendous changes that have been made in secondary and university English language classrooms across the region.
This book presents a critical analysis and investigation of current developments and debates in the use of information technology (IT) in English language teaching (ELT) internationally. The first section of the book provides an overview of the key issues in IT and innovation in English language education such as the complex nature of IT and its use in ELT, both in the present and future, and the often problematic nature of innovation in relation to IT and ELT. It focuses primarily on the level of programs and curricula, looking at the way organizations and educational systems in different countries respond to the so-called “IT imperative.” The second section adopts a more overtly social constructivist perspective to explore examples of innovative practice in IT use in ELT around the world. It tackles issues arising from classroom implementation and pedagogy, looking at the way learners and teachers can and do use IT in their everyday practice. The final section investigates the problems of building a community of professional practice in IT in English language education. It focuses on the level of professional development and teacher education and in doing so, demonstrates how the implementation of IT in schools and classrooms can be enhanced through taking into account key aspects of teachers’ existing contexts and professional practices. Throughout the book, the contributors adopt a constructive but critical perspective on the use of IT in English language education, often challenging its role in developing learner autonomy, its effectiveness in developing language learning and its capacity to enhance pedagogic practice in the language teaching classroom, at the same time suggesting effective models and guidelines for good practice.
This book examines a wide range of innovations in language learning and teaching in Japan. Each of the chapters describes the impetus for a change or new development in a particular context, from early childhood to adult learning, details its implementation and provides an evaluation of its success. In doing so, they provide a comprehensive overview of best practice in innovating language education from teaching practice in formal classroom settings, to self-directed learning beyond the classroom, and offer recommendations to enhance language education in Japan and beyond. The book will be of interest to scholars of applied linguistics and language development, and in particular to those involved in managing change in language education that attempts to mediate between global trends and local needs.
Language teaching approaches, methods and procedures are constantly undergoing reassessment. New ideas keep emerging as the growing complexity of the means of communication and the opportunities created by technology put language skills to new uses. In addition, the political, social and economic impact of globalisation, the new demands of the labour market that result from it, the pursuit of competitiveness, the challenges of intercultural communication and the diversification of culture have opened new perspectives on the central role that foreign languages have come to play in the development of contemporary societies. This book provides an insight into the latest developments in the field and discusses the new trends in foreign language teaching in four major areas, namely methods and approaches, teacher training, innovation in the classroom, and evaluation and assessment.
Winner - British Council Innovation in English Language Teaching Award 2006 This book was written for language teachers by language teachers, with a view to encouraging readers to use more tasks in their lessons, and to explore for themselves various aspects of task-based teaching and learning. It gives insights into ways in which tasks can be designed, adapted and implemented in a range of teaching contexts and illustrates ways in which tasks and task-based learning can be investigated as a research activity. Practising language teachers and student professionals on MA TESOL/Applied Linguistics courses will find this a rich resource of varied experience in the classroom and a stimulus to their own qualitative studies.
Managing Evaluation and Innovation in Language Teaching focuses on the connections to be made between evaluation and change in language education with a specific focus on English Language Teaching. The book demonstrates the central importance of evaluation in relation to language projects and programmes, the management of change and innovation, and in improving language teacher development. The introductory chapter provides an overview of the present trends in evaluation as well as offering examples of recent evaluation projects. Subsequent chapters identify contemporary issues in evaluation and their relevance to language teaching, covering a number of cultural and ethnographic studies in evaluation management in different world-wide contexts, as well as drawing insights from other related disciplines. The editors seek to draw attention to the possibilities of inter-disciplinary exchange to inform the reader of current practice, and highlight emerging issues in the expanding field of evaluation in language teaching, especially in ELT. The contemporary nature of the studies presented here will be relevant to both post graduate students following language education programmes as well as to professionals involved in language teaching. It will be of particular interest to those involved in the management of innovation and the evaluation of projects and programmes, such as curriculum developers, Director of Studies, and professionals with a special responsibility for bringing about change in language teaching contexts.
This edited collection presents a study of innovation in teaching, learning, assessment and teacher development practices in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA). The thirteen research-based chapters in this collection examine recent innovations in English language teaching, drawing on classroom, administrative and learning experiences from seven of the countries in the region. The major trends analyzed across the volume include the language skills of reading and writing and the prevalence of technology and technology-enhanced instruction. It highlights that innovative teaching, learning and assessment practices that are now in place in virtually all levels of English language teaching and learning from primary school to university to adult education sectors, and reflects on possible ways forward for innovation in the field of ELT. This book will provide valuable insight for scholars of applied linguistics and practitioners working in language policy,
Leadership in English Language Education: Theoretical Foundations and Practical Skills for Changing Times presents both theoretical approaches to leadership and practical skills leaders in English language education need to be effective. Discussing practical skills in detail, and providing readers with the opportunity to acquire new skills and apply them in their own contexts, the text is organized around three themes: The roles and characteristics of leaders Skills for leading ELT leadership in practice Leadership theories and approaches from business and industry are applied to and conclusions are drawn for English language teaching in a variety of organizational contexts, including intensive English programs in English-speaking countries, TESOL departments in universities, ESL programs in community colleges, EFL departments in non-English speaking countries, adult education programs, and commercial ELT centers and schools around the world. This is an essential resource for all administrators, teachers, academics, and teacher candidates in English language education.
Heritage language (HL) education has as its primary aims to help learners regain, develop, or maintain their HL while gaining deeper understanding of their cultural heritage. The topic has gained traction in recent years, as the interest in bilingual education and the numbers of people speaking English as a second language have grown. Teachers play a vital role in advancing HL learning (HLL). This edited volume presents them with the knowledge and tools necessary to overcome common obstacles in HLL based on cutting-edge research. In twelve chapters, contributors address the various types of challenges faced in trying to transfer research findings into new teaching approaches and encourages teacher innovation. Part I reviews fundamental issues in curricular, teacher, and program development, while Part II addresses pedagogical strategies, techniques, and approaches. The book seeks to answer questions such as, What are the best ways to help HLL aquire language for use in professional settings? How should HL learners' skills be assessed? How should new HL programs be designed? How do we define HL learners? How do we prepare teachers to meet their needs? While many HLL books focus on Spanish, information on multiple languages is included in this book.
Provides a ground-breaking attempt to unite discussions on the pedagogical implications of the global spread of English, and lobby for change.
This two volume handbook provides a comprehensive examination of policy, practice, research and theory related to English Language Teaching in international contexts. More than 70 chapters highlight the research foundation for best practices, frameworks for policy decisions, and areas of consensus and controversy in second language acquisition and pedagogy. The Handbook provides a unique resource for policy makers, educational administrators, and researchers concerned with meeting the increasing demand for effective English language teaching. It offers a strongly socio-cultural view of language learning and teaching. It is comprehensive and global in perspective with a range of fresh new voices in English language teaching research.
This book provides a comprehensive and practical introduction for teachers who are making the transition into management.
This book investigates new English language policies and initiatives which have been introduced and implemented across Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Uruguay and Venezuela. Chapters are organized around three themes. Chapters in the first section critically examine newly-implemented English language policies, as well as factors that contribute to and prevent the implementation of such policies. Chapters in the second section describe and analyze current teacher preparation and teacher development initiatives, in addition to the challenges and opportunities associated with such initiatives. Finally, the third section features school- and classroom-based research designed to investigate the status of English language teaching and the implementation of innovative programs. All authors have a first-hand understanding of the South American context and draw on references and resources which originate beyond Inner Circle countries. The book showcases examples of innovation and success in a variety of complex contexts and will serve as a starting point for researchers, as well as being of interest to students, policymakers and stakeholders.
This timely and critical look at the teaching of English shows how language is used to create hierarchies of cultural privilege in public schools across the United States. Drawing on the work of four ESL teachers who pursued anti-racist pedagogical practices during their first year of teaching, the author provides a compelling account of how new teachers might gain agency for culturally responsive teaching in spite of school cultures that often discourage such approaches. She combines current research and original analyses to shed light on real classroom situations faced by teachers of linguistically diverse populations. This book will help pre- and inservice teachers to think about such challenges as differential achievement between language learners and “native-speakers”; hierarchies of languages and language varieties; the difference between an accent identity and an incorrect pronunciation; and the use of students’ first languages in English classes. An important resource for classroom teaching, educational policy, school leadership, and teacher preparation, this volume includes reflection questions at the end of each chapter. “This is an important and timely book. How to best educate new Americans, including the best language policies, is a matter of controversy and dissent. Race, Empire, and English Language Teaching is must reading for teachers and school administrators, policymakers, and concerned citizens who are interested in a deeper understanding of how anti-racist pedagogical practices and culturally responsive teaching can work to engage all students moving forward.” —Marcelo M. Suárez-Orozco, dean and distinguished professor of education, UCLA Graduate School of Education & Information Studies, co-author of Learning a New Land “Foregrounding teachers’ voices, Motha lucidly conceptualizes ideological facets of teaching English—monolingualism, native speakerism, and standard language—as racialized practices that undergird colonial power and contradict pluricentric understandings of English. Her analysis is intellectually robust, morally engaging, and discursively accessible. This is a must-read for all ESL professionals.” —Ryuko Kubota, professor, Department of Language and Literacy Education, The University of British Columbia Suhanthie Motha is assistant professor in the Department of English at the University of Washington, Seattle.
English Language Teaching in its Social Context offers sociolinguistic, ethnographic, and social-psychological perspectives on TESOL teaching and learning and introduces the relevant literature on second language acquisition. Together with its companion volumes, it presents English language teaching in a variety of specific institutional, geographic and cultural contexts. The articles - a range of seminal and specially commissioned pieces - have been carefully chosen to present four major principles of English language teaching: * they focus on the roles played by teachers and learners * recognise the individuality of language learners * support teachers in the provision of active guidance for students' learning * examine both positive and negative patterns of interaction between learners and teachers. This Reader offers people unfamiliar with research in this field an overall impression of English language teaching issues while allowing the more experienced reader the opportunity to relate his or her own experiences to the theories presented.
Over the last decade task-based approaches to language learning and teaching (TBLT) have become a global focus of increased levels of research. Governments around the world have turned to TBLT as a potential solution for curricula that lack authentic and meaningful engagement with language learning and are failing to motivate students as a result. This book focuses on Asia, where this shift has been particularly in evidence. TBLT has often been implemented in top-down approaches to curriculum development, which presents a huge range of challenges at the cultural as well as the pedagogic level. Contemporary Task Based Language Teaching in Asia looks at the drivers, stakeholders and obstacles across the region. Some countries have adapted TBLT to deal with the local constraints, others have found it hard to apply and many are still in the process of investigating its implementation in their specific contexts. This collection is important to all involved in language development, from curriculum reform to materials development. It assists from programme evaluation to the setting of assessment standards. The chapters cover all aspects of language education across Asia, from primary to tertiary, private and public education, as well as innovations at local, regional and national levels.
This book challenges current practices in ELT materials design in order to transform coursebook quality. It proposes ways to improve task design through resources such as drama, poetry, literature and online resources; and it maps out a number of unusual connections between theory and practice in the field of ELT materials development.
Questions about what to teach and how best to teach it are what drive professional practice in the English language classroom. Innovation and change in English language education addresses these key questions so that teachers are able to understand and manage change to organise teaching and learning more effectively. The book provides an accessible introduction to current theory and research in innovation and change in ELT and shows how these understandings have been applied to the practical concerns of the curriculum and the classroom. In specially commissioned chapters written by experts in the field, the volume sets out the key issues in innovation and change and shows how these relate to actual practice offers a guide to innovation and change in key areas grounded in research relates theory to practice through the use of illustrative case studies and examples brings together the very best scholarship in TESOL and language education from around the world This book will be of interest to upper undergraduate and graduate students in applied linguistics, language education and TESOL as well as pre-service and in-service teachers, teacher educators, researchers and administrators keen to create and manage teaching and learning more effectively.

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