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The third edition has been significantly updated, especially to reflect case trends in the International Criminal Tribunals for Former Yugoslavia and for Rwanda (encompassing, among other matters, individual responsibility, defenses, war crimes, genocide, and other crimes against humanity), as well as developments and issues with respect to creation of the new permanent International Criminal Court. Some chapters have been deleted and some materials have been cut back to include new materials for a more manageable book.
International Criminal Law provides a set of teaching materials furnishing students with a grounding in the transnational issues likely to arise in federal criminal cases, and also in the law produced as a consequence of international efforts to impose criminal responsibility on the perpetrators of human rights atrocities. International Criminal Law offers, for teaching purposes, a collection of cases (mainly domestic) and other materials, together with notes and questions about those cases and materials. The first part introduces the field of international criminal law, and includes a chapter on the general principles of both domestic and international law governing efforts to apply U.S. criminal law to foreign crimes and foreign criminals. The second part covers the specific application of those principles to cases involving the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, antitrust and securities regulation, export controls, computer crimes, narcotics and money laundering, piracy and terrorism, and torture. The third part addresses procedural aspects of trying such cases in U.S. courts. This section also treats the extraterritorial application of the U.S. Constitution, immunities from jurisdiction, mutual assistance in criminal cases, extradition, alternatives to extradition, prisoner transfers, recognition of foreign criminal judgments, and the bearing on international human rights instruments on criminal procedure. The final part of International Criminal Law deals with the prosecution of international crimes, and takes up the question of what crimes constitute international crimes. This section also discusses the Nuremberg and Tokyo precedents, the ad hoc tribunals for the former Yugoslavia and for Rwanda, the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court, and the substantive law of international crimes such as aggression, genocide, crimes against humanity, and war crimes. International Criminal Law is supplemented annually. This eBook features links to Lexis Advance for further legal research options.
The purpose of this book is to compare different solutions adopted by nine industrialized countries to common problems of income tax design. As in other legal domains, comparative study of income taxation can provide fresh perspectives from which to examine a particular national system. Increasing economic globalization also makes understanding foreign tax systems relevant to a growing set of transnational business transactions. Comparative study is, however, notoriously difficult. Full understanding of a foreign tax system may require mastery not only of a foreign language, but also of foreign business and legal cultures. It would be the work of a lifetime for a single individual to achieve that level of understanding of the nine income taxes compared in this volume. Suppose, however, that an international group of tax law professors, each expert in his own national system, were asked to describe how that system resolved specific problems of income tax design with respect to individuals, business organizations, and international transactions. Suppose further that the leaders of the group wove the resulting answers into a single continuous exposition, which was then reviewed and critiqued by a wider group of tax teachers. The resulting text would provide a convenient and comprehensive introduction to foreign approaches to income taxation for teachers, students, policy-makers and practitioners. That is the path followed by Hugh Ault and Brian Arnold and their collaborators in the development of this fascinating book. Henceforth, a reader interested in how other developed countries resolve such structural issues as the taxation of fringe benefits, the effect of unrealized appreciation at death, the classification of business entities, expatriation to avoid taxes, and so on, can turn to this volume for an initial answer. This book should greatly facilitate comparative analysis in teaching and writing about taxation in the US and elsewhere.

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