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While conventional warfare has an established body of legal precedence, the legality of drone strikes by the United States in Pakistan and elsewhere remains ambiguous. This book explores the legal and political issues surrounding the use of drones in Pakistan. Drawing from international treaty law, customary international law, and statistical data on the impact of the strikes, Sikander Ahmed Shah asks whether drone strikes by the United States in Pakistan are in compliance with international humanitarian law. The book questions how international law views the giving of consent between States for military action, and explores what this means for the interaction between sovereignty and consent. The book goes on to look at the socio-political realities of drone strikes in Pakistan, scrutinizing the impact of drone strikes on both Pakistani politics and US-Pakistan relationships. Topics include the Pakistan army-government relationship, the evolution of international institutions as a result of drone strikes, and the geopolitical dynamics affecting the region. As a detailed and critical examination of the legal and political challenges presented by drone strikes, this book will be essential to scholars and students of the law of armed conflict, security studies, political science and international relations.
International Law and Drone Strikes in Pakistan
Language: en
Pages: 247
Authors: Sikander Ahmed Shah
Categories: Law
Type: BOOK - Published: 2014-11-13 - Publisher: Routledge

While conventional warfare has an established body of legal precedence, the legality of drone strikes by the United States in Pakistan and elsewhere remains ambiguous. This book explores the legal and political issues surrounding the use of drones in Pakistan. Drawing from international treaty law, customary international law, and statistical
The Lawfulness of US Drone Strikes in Pakistan
Language: en
Pages: 105
Authors: Robert Donaldson, Air University (U.S.). School of Advanced Air and Space Studies
Categories: Military weapons (International law)
Type: BOOK - Published: 2012 - Publisher:

"In response to the terrorist attacks of 9/11, the US has been conducting covert targeted killing operations against al-Qaeda, the Taliban and other associated forces located in Pakistan's Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA). Using remotely piloted aircraft, also known as drones, the US has been able to bring lethal justice
US Drone Policy and Anti-American Sentiments in Pakistan (2001-2012)
Language: en
Pages: 84
Authors: Waseem Zeab Khan , Jamshed-ur-Rehman
Categories: Military weapons (International law)
Type: BOOK - Published: 2014-09-03 - Publisher: EduPedia Publications

The drone attacks started in Pakistan in 2004 under the Bush presidency, and are still operating, targeting the so-called ‘High value’ targets. But the high value targets are not achieved, but the local Taliban, and many civilians are being killed in these covert drone strikes. It is noteworthy that, Obama
Terrorism and the US Drone Attacks in Pakistan
Language: en
Pages: 176
Authors: Imdad Ullah
Categories: Social Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2021-03-29 - Publisher: Routledge

This book analyses the US drone attacks against terrorists in Pakistan to assess whether the ‘pre-emptive’ use of combat drones to kill terrorists is ever legally justified. Exploring the doctrinal discourse of pre-emption vis-à-vis the US drone attacks against terrorists in Pakistan, the book shows that the debate surrounding this
Legal and Ethical Implications of Drone Warfare
Language: en
Pages: 130
Authors: Michael J. Boyle
Categories: Law
Type: BOOK - Published: 2018-04-19 - Publisher: Routledge

Over the last decade, the U.S., UK Israel and other states have begun to use Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) for military operations and for targeted killings in places like Pakistan, Yemen and Somalia. Worldwide, over 80 governments are developing their own drone programs, and even non-state actors such as the