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The book analyzes the dynamics of factionalism among the political elite in the Islamic Republic of Iran and the approaches of the different political factions to economic, socio-cultural, and foreign policy issues from the Islamic Revolution in 1979 until 2008.
Examining the nature of relations between Iran and Palestine, this book investigates the relationship between state and authorities in the Middle East. Analysing the connections of the Iranian revolutionary movements, both the Left and the Islamic camps’ perspectives are scrutinized. To provide a historical background to the post-revolutionary period, the genealogy of pro-Palestinian sentiments before 1979 are traced additionally. Demonstrating the pro-Palestinian stance of post-revolutionary Iran, the study focuses on the causes of roots of the ideological outlook and the interest of the state. Despite a growing body of literature on the Iranian Revolution and its impacts on the region, Iran’s connection with Palestine have been overlooked. This new volume fills the gap in the literature and enables readers to unpack the history of the two states. This unique and comprehensive coverage of Iran and Palestine’s relationship is a key resource for scholars and students interested in international relations, politics, Islamic and Middle East studies.
"In the first seven sections, I discuss forgery allegations on various silver objects in conjunction with ill-understood metallurgical techniques and erroneous philological assumptions. The remaining sections are then devoted to the reinterpretation of Median, Achaemenid, and Sasanian history, as well as Avestan dilemmas, in light of information derived from these objects and other newly discovered sources. They succinctly bring to light the paradoxical image of "Burning-Water" as a pervasive dualist concept on which all subsequent royal ideologies were built. They also show the substantial impact of Iranian religious conflicts on Abrahamic religions. Finally, the flaws of UNESCO's convention on cultural properties are addressed in the appendix."--Pages 1-2.
In light of the great importance Iranians themselves attach to their imaginative Persian literature and in light of the underutilization of literary figures, works, and evidence in existing studies of Iranian culture, this work focuses on leading authors and classic literary works in attempting to discern enduring cultural features and values. It is a Persianist account of the pivotal features of Iranian culture through the eyes of six Persian literary figures, three from the pre-modern and three from the modern literary history of Iran. The work examines the literary dimensions of the Persian culture as well as the political, social and religious significance of the dimensions within the culture. The author reveals the ancient Persian tradition of the struggle between two opposing forces and the way in which it relates to the present political turmoil in that country.
Using recently declassified U.S. State Department archives, Mohammad Gholi Majd describes the rampant tyranny and destruction of Iran in the decades between the two world wars in a sensational yet thoroughly scholarly study that will rewrite the political and economic history of the country. The book begins with the British invasion of Iran in April 1918 and ends with the Anglo-Russian invasion in August 1941. Though historians are aware of the events that ensued, until now they have had no written evidence of the dreadful magnitude of the activities. Majd documents how the British brought to power an obscure and semi-illiterate military officer, Reza Khan, who was made shah in 1925. Thereafter, Majd shows, Iran was subjected to a level of brutality not seen for centuries. He also documents the financial plunder of the country during the period: records show that Reza Shah looted the bulk of Iran's oil revenues on the pretext of buying arms, amassing at least $100 million in his London bank accounts and huge sums in New York and Switzerland. Not even Iran's ancient crown jewels were spared. In contrast to incomplete and unreliable British records for the period, the recently declassified archives and bank records that Majd uses encompass a wide range of political, social, military, and economic matters. A work with immense implications, this book will correct the myth in Iranian history that the period 1921-41 was one of unqualified progress and reform.
Shibley Telhami and Michael Barnett, together with experts on Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Israel, Jordan, and Syria, explore how the formation and transformation of national and state identities affect the foreign policy behavior of Middle Eastern states.
Drawing on ethnographic encounters with self-identified gay men in Iran, this book explores the construction, enactment, and veiling and unveiling of gay identity and same-sex desire in the capital city of Tehran. The research draws on diverse interpretive, historical, online and empirical sources in order to present critical and nuanced insights into the politics of recognition and representation and the constitution of same-sex desire under the specific conditions of Iranian modernity. As it engages with accounts of the persecuted Iranian gay male subject as a victim of the barbarism of the Islamic Republic of Iran, the book addresses interpretive questions of sexuality governance in transnational contexts and attends to issues of human rights frameworks in weighing social justice and political claims made by and on behalf of sexual and gender minorities. The book thus combines empirical data with a critical consideration of the politics of same-sex desire for Iranian gay men.

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