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Life is not what it seems. Do you occasionally have that strange feeling known as déjà vu? Do you sometimes feel that you know what is going to happen next? Do you ever have a strong feeling that actions you are about to take are the right (or wrong) thing to do? All these perceptions may be everyday clues to your immortality. This book pr...
Presents opposing viewpoints on the issue of life after death, including essays with religious and scientific perspectives.
There is Life After Death is both illuminating and comforting in its message and conclusions — and goes a long way in putting to rest one of the last great taboos of our culture.
Presents a collection of essays that offer varying viewpoints on the subject of life after death.
The author's lifetime of experiences with psychic Physical Phenomena, particularly in their spiritualist Home Circle between 1946 and 1958, with his mother, Minnie Harrison, as the medium, where he met and spoke with over 1500 materialised spirit people. A fine, readable, definitive book on Psychic Phenomena. Now revised, with many more photographs, additional material with regard to the Stewart Alexander circle and Spiritual healing and Index.
Dr Deepak Chopra, the world-famous pioneer in the field of mind-body medicine, addresses one of the fundamental questions of existence: what happens when we die?. Drawing upon personal experience, the wisdom of ancient Vedic philosophy and state-of-the-art particle physics, Chopra helps us to overcome our fears about dying and to consider the fantastic possibilities that may await us in the afterlife. This is the book that Dr Chopra has been preparing to write his entire life. In it, he considers the theory that death is an illusion of the senses and that the soul survives in an ongoing spiral of refinement, ending in enlightenment. Thought-provoking exercises offer a first-hand experience of these and other ideas, helping you to make sense of your own spirituality whatever path you choose to follow, and offering you your very own map of eternity.
A magisterial work of social history, Life After Death illuminates the many different ways ancient civilizations grappled with the question of what exactly happens to us after we die. In a masterful exploration of how Western civilizations have defined the afterlife, Alan F. Segal weaves together biblical and literary scholarship, sociology, history, and philosophy. A renowned scholar, Segal examines the maps of the afterlife found in Western religious texts and reveals not only what various cultures believed but how their notions reflected their societies’ realities and ideals, and why those beliefs changed over time. He maintains that the afterlife is the mirror in which a society arranges its concept of the self. The composition process for Judaism, Christianity, and Islam begins in grief and ends in the victory of the self over death. Arguing that in every religious tradition the afterlife represents the ultimate reward for the good, Segal combines historical and anthropological data with insights gleaned from religious and philosophical writings to explain the following mysteries: why the Egyptians insisted on an afterlife in heaven, while the body was embalmed in a tomb on earth; why the Babylonians viewed the dead as living in underground prisons; why the Hebrews remained silent about life after death during the period of the First Temple, yet embraced it in the Second Temple period (534 B.C.E. –70 C.E.); and why Christianity placed the afterlife in the center of its belief system. He discusses the inner dialogues and arguments within Judaism and Christianity, showing the underlying dynamic behind them, as well as the ideas that mark the differences between the two religions. In a thoughtful examination of the influence of biblical views of heaven and martyrdom on Islamic beliefs, he offers a fascinating perspective on the current troubling rise of Islamic fundamentalism. In tracing the organic, historical relationships between sacred texts and communities of belief and comparing the visions of life after death that have emerged throughout history, Segal sheds a bright, revealing light on the intimate connections between notions of the afterlife, the societies that produced them, and the individual’s search for the ultimate meaning of life on earth. From the Hardcover edition.
This book offers a novel approach to the cultural and social history of Europe after the Second World War.
Because every single one of us will die, most of us would like to know what—if anything—awaits us afterward, not to mention the fate of lost loved ones. Given the nearly universal vested interest in deciding this question in favor of an afterlife, it is no surprise that the vast majority of books on the topic affirm the reality of life after death without a backward glance. But the evidence of our senses and the ever-gaining strength of scientific evidence strongly suggest otherwise. In The Myth of an Afterlife: The Case against Life after Death, Michael Martin and Keith Augustine collect a series of contributions that redress this imbalance in the literature by providing a strong, comprehensive, and up-to-date casebook of the chief arguments against an afterlife. Divided into four separate sections, this collection opens with a broad overview of the issues, as contributors consider the strongest evidence of whether or not we survive death—in particular the biological basis of all mental states and their grounding in brain activity that ceases to function at death. Next, contributors consider a host of conceptual and empirical difficulties that confront the various ways of “surviving” death—from bodiless minds to bodily resurrection to any form of posthumous survival. Then essayists turn to internal inconsistencies between traditional theological conceptions of an afterlife—heaven, hell, karmic rebirth—and widely held ethical principles central to the belief systems supporting those notions. In the final section, authors offer critical evaluations of the main types of evidence for an afterlife. Fully interdisciplinary, The Myth of an Afterlife: The Case against Life after Death brings together a variety of fields of research to make that case, including cognitive neuroscience, philosophy of mind, personal identity, philosophy of religion, moral philosophy, psychical research, and anomalistic psychology. As the definitive casebook of arguments against life after death, this collection is required reading for any instructor, researcher, and student of philosophy, religious studies, or theology. It is sure to raise provocative issues new to readers, regardless of background, from those who believe fervently in the reality of an afterlife to those who do not or are undecided on the matter.
Renowned physicist Vandersande surveys evidence for an afterlife and finds a lot of the observed physical phenomena both credible and compelling. Intended for skeptics and believers alike, this text condenses more than 100 years of literature and testimony.
In the follow-up to Elisa Medhus’s My Son and the Afterlife—“a heartfelt, deeply moving story” (Eben Alexander, New York Times bestselling author of Proof of Heaven)—her son Erik tells his astounding story directly from the afterlife, describing in detail his death, transition, and spiritual renewal. My Life After Death begins on the tragic day when Erik Medhus took his own life. What follows is a moment-by-moment account of the spiritual life he discovers on the other side—told for the very first time in his own words as channeled by medium Jamie Butler and then transcribed by his mother Elisa. Overflowing with his signature honesty and candor, Erik describes more than just a visit to the afterlife. He personally walks us through the experience of dying, transitioning into spirit form, and reveals a detailed look at the life awaiting us on the other side. In this intimate and provocative memoir, crucial questions will finally be answered, including: What does it feel like to die? What is it like to become a spirit? Why and how do spirits communicate with the living? Is there a heaven? Ultimately, Erik’s story provides the answers that will help readers find solace and remove the fears surrounding death, showing that love has no boundaries and life does not truly end.
While death is a universal experience, the traditions that surround it differ from culture to culture. How should the body of the deceased be laid to rest? What should be done with his or her belongings? How can a person's legacy live on through traditions and keepsakes? This volume explores practices around the world, addressing the practical and spiritual considerations that come with death and encouraging readers to keep an open mind toward the rituals and beliefs of other cultures and turn a critical eye toward their own.
Join internationally recognized sensory neuroscientist Robert Davis as he examines the latest experimental evidence and theories of existence after "death." This treatment is comprehensive in scope and combines the most recent experimental and anecdotal evidence. Davis explores the potential for an afterlife through the analysis of case studies, interviews, and researched findings of near-death and out-of-body experiences, mediumship, apparitions, psychic explanations, and reincarnation. In addition, he examines evidence-based scientific theories that include the multiverse, biologic brain activity, consciousness-brain connection, and many others. Davis offers compelling data in an unbiased presentation to answer the age-old question: Is death really the end of life or is there life after death?
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A collection of four essays on death, dying, and the afterlife.

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