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Isaiah in the New Testament brings together a set of specially commissioned studies by authors who are experts in their field. Beginning with an introductory chapter on the use of Isaiah in the Dead Sea Scrolls and Second Temple literature, contributors go on to discuss each of the New Testament books that contain quotations from Isaiah: Matthew, Mark, (Q), Luke-Acts, John, Romans and Galatians, 1 and 2 Corinthians, Hebrews, 1 Peter and Revelation. Together they provide an overview of the status, role and function of Isaiah in the first century, considering the Greek and Hebrew manuscript traditions and offering insights into the various hermeneutical stances of the New Testament authors and the development of New Testament theology. The volume includes contributions from Darrell Hannah, Morna Hooker, Christopher Tuckett, Richard Beaton, Bart Koet, Catrin Williams, J. Ross Wagner, Florian Wilk, Cecil McCullough, Steve Moyise and David Mathewson.
The book of Isaiah depicts for its readers what happens when Isaiah volunteers to become Yahweh's gofer--when he acts and speaks on Yahweh's behalf with Yahweh's authority. In this careful and insightful commentary on Isaiah, Goldingay unfolds the voices and messages of those prophetic actions and experiences. While doing this he points out that three attributes of Yahweh come into distinctive focus in Isaiah: Yahweh's majesty and authority, Yahweh's passion in anger and compassion, and Yahweh's insight and capacity to formulate a plan and put it into effect. Goldingay also examines the way Isaiah thinks about the people of God and the relationship between the vision of who they could be, the reality of who they were, the calamity of that contrast, and ultimately the promise Yahweh offers to them.
A unique commentary that explores each passage from three vital perspectives: original meaning, bridging context, contemporary significance. Isaiah wrestles with the realities of people who are not convicted by the truth but actually hardened by it, and with a God whose actions sometimes seem unintelligible, or even worse, appears to be absent. Yet Isaiah penetrates beyond these experiences to an even greater reality. Isaiah sees God’s rule over history and his capacity to take the worst of human actions and use it for good. He declares the truth that even in the darkest hours, the Holy One of Israel is infinitely trustworthy.
The MacArthur Bible Studies provide intriguing examinations of the whole of Scripture and continues to be one of the bestselling study guide series on the market today. In this study, Dr. MacArthur examines the words of the prophet Isaiah, showing how God proved to be faithful to his people (and us) by promising to send Messiah who would save them from sin. These latest all-new studies join the ranks of the previously released study guides, now offering readers a comprehensive selection of Old Testament Bible studies by bestselling author and theologian John MacArthur. Each lesson includes: Drawing Near: An opening question based on the key theme or topic of the lesson The Context: Background information on the passage of Scripture being studied Keys to the Text: Detailed commentary on the passage being studied Unleashing the Text: Application questions on the passage highlighted in the lesson Exploring the Meaning: Three key takeaways from the passage Reflecting on the Text: Reflection questions on the passage highlighted in the lesson Personal Response: A journaling section to help readers apply the principles Each study includes an introduction that provides background information to each book of the Bible being studied and a closing "Reviewing Key Principles" lesson to help cement the main themes of the study.
Reading the Book of Isaiah in its original context is the crucial prerequisite for reading its citation and use in later interpretation, including the New Testament writings, argues Ben Witherington III. Here he offers pastors, teachers, and students an accessible commentary to Isaiah, as well as a reasoned consideration of how Isaiah was heard and read in early Christianity. By reading “forward and backward” Witherington advances the scholarly discussion of intertextuality and opens a new avenue for biblical theology.
This is a new type of commentary on some of the most familiar language and imagery in the Bible, showing how Isaiah has been used by Christians in all kinds of contexts up to the present. There is much interest in reader-response, the history of interpretation and the sociology of sacred texts--in what the text does as much as what it means. With full documentation and illustrations, Sawyer gives an insight into Isaiah's influence, from the cult of the Virgin Mary and anti-Semitism to Christian feminism and liberation theology.
A key emphasis of Brevard Childs's distinguished career has been to show not only that the canon of Scripture comprises both Old and New Testaments but also that the concept of "canon" includes the way the Christian church continues to wrestle in every age with the meaning of its sacred texts. In this new volume Childs uses the book of Isaiah as a case study of the church's endeavor throughout history to understand its Scriptures. In each chapter Childs focuses on a different Christian age, using the work of key figures to illustrate the church's changing views of Isaiah. After looking at the Septuagint translation, Childs examines commentaries and tractates from the patristic, Reformation, and modern periods. His review shows that despite an enormous diversity in time, culture, nationality, and audience, these works nevertheless display a "family resemblance" in their theological understandings of this central Old Testament text. Childs also reveals how the church struggled to adapt to changing social and historical conditions, often by correcting or refining traditional methodologies, while at the same time maintaining a theological stance measured by faithfulness to Jesus Christ. In an important final chapter Childs draws out some implications of his work for modern debates over the role of Scripture in the life of the church. Of great value to scholars, ministers, and students, this book will also draw general readers into the exciting theological debate currently raging in the Christian church about the faithful interpretation of Scripture.
This prophetic Old Testament book begins by telling the reader that it is the "vision" of Isaiah. The use of the word "vision," John F. A. Sawyer explains, conveys to the reader that regardless of when the prophet lived, "his 'words' go beyond the immediate historical circumstances of his day." Sawyer argues that we as modern readers also are being addressed. Carrying forward brilliantly the pattern established by Barclay's New Testament series, the Daily Study Bible has been extended to cover the entire Old Testament as well. Invaluable for individual devotional study, for group discussion, and for classroom use, the Daily Study Bible provides a useful, reliable, and eminently readable way to discover what the Scriptures were saying then and what God is saying today.
Oswalt's study on the first 39 chapters of the Book of Isaiah is part of The New International Commentary on the Old Testament. Like its companion series on the New Testament, this commentary devotes considerable care to achieving a balance between technical information and homiletic-devotional interpretation.
Comments on the oracles of a prophet who lived in the closing half of the 8th century B. C. and whose interest in contemporary politics and international affairs was the product of his faith in the Holy God, who rules in and over all history.
Continuing a Gold Medallion Award-winning legacy, this completely revised edition of The Expositor’s Bible Commentary series puts world-class biblical scholarship in your hands. Based on the original twelve-volume set that has become a staple in college and seminary libraries and pastors’ studies worldwide, this new thirteen-volume edition marshals the most current evangelical scholarship and resources. The thoroughly revised features consist of: • Comprehensive introductions • Short and precise bibliographies • Detailed outlines • Insightful expositions of passages and verses • Overviews of sections of Scripture to illuminate the big picture • Occasional reflections to give more detail on important issues • Notes on textual questions and special problems, placed close to the texts in question • Transliterations and translations of Hebrew and Greek words, enabling readers to understand even the more technical notes • A balanced and respectful approach toward marked differences of opinion
One in a series of twenty Old Testament verse-by-verse commentary books edited by Max Anders. Includes discussion starters, teaching plan, and more. Great for lay teachers and pastors alike.
Enthält: Vol. 1: Isaiah 1-39; Vol. 2: Isaiah 40-66.
In this volume, Walter Brueggemann focuses on Second Isaiah (Isaiah 40-55), believed to be written by a second exilic poet, and Third Isaiah (Isaiah 56-66), a third group of texts that rearticulate Isaianic theology in yet another faith situation. Brueggemann discusses both the distinctiveness of the texts and their canonical relatedness. Books in the Westminster Bible Companion series assist laity in their study of the Bible as a guide to Christian faith and practice. Each volume explains the biblical book in its original historical context and explores its significance for faithful living today. These books are ideal for individual study and for Bible study classes and groups.
The widely heralded New American Commentary series continues with this second volume on the Old Testament book of Isaiah, detailing God’s intimacy and grandeur.
The studies in this volume investigate Isaiah's use of early sacred tradition, the editing and contextualization of oracles within the Isaianic tradition itself, and the interpretation of the book of Isaiah in later traditions (as in the various versions and interpretations of the text).
The Word Biblical Commentary delivers the best in biblical scholarship, from the leading scholars of our day who share a commitment to Scripture as divine revelation. This series emphasizes a thorough analysis of textual, linguistic, structural, and theological evidence. The result is judicious and balanced insight into the meanings of the text in the framework of biblical theology. These widely acclaimed commentaries serve as exceptional resources for the professional theologian and instructor, the seminary or university student, the working minister, and everyone concerned with building theological understanding from a solid base of biblical scholarship. Overview of Commentary Organization Introduction—covers issues pertaining to the whole book, including context, date, authorship, composition, interpretive issues, purpose, and theology. Each section of the commentary includes: Pericope Bibliography—a helpful resource containing the most important works that pertain to each particular pericope. Translation—the author’s own translation of the biblical text, reflecting the end result of exegesis and attending to Hebrew and Greek idiomatic usage of words, phrases, and tenses, yet in reasonably good English. Notes—the author’s notes to the translation that address any textual variants, grammatical forms, syntactical constructions, basic meanings of words, and problems of translation. Form/Structure/Setting—a discussion of redaction, genre, sources, and tradition as they concern the origin of the pericope, its canonical form, and its relation to the biblical and extra-biblical contexts in order to illuminate the structure and character of the pericope. Rhetorical or compositional features important to understanding the passage are also introduced here. Comment—verse-by-verse interpretation of the text and dialogue with other interpreters, engaging with current opinion and scholarly research. Explanation—brings together all the results of the discussion in previous sections to expose the meaning and intention of the text at several levels: (1) within the context of the book itself; (2) its meaning in the OT or NT; (3) its place in the entire canon; (4) theological relevance to broader OT or NT issues. General Bibliography—occurring at the end of each volume, this extensive bibliographycontains all sources used anywhere in the commentary.
A classic in conservative Old Testament scholarship, this three-volume commentary concentrates primarily on the meaning of the text of Isaiah rather than on specific textual problems. Volume 1 covers chapters 1-18; Volume 2 looks at chapters 19-39; Volume 3 surveys chapters 40-66.
Encounter the heart of God. The book of Isaiah is a collection of prophecies that is more than a historical record or teaching. It is the overarching vision of the heart of God revealed to his prophet. It spans the ages and touches every nation on earth, becoming a collective overview of all that God has planned. This study is designed to help you discover God's love through the book of Isaiah. Each uniquely crafted lesson opens with an introduction and key verse to reveal important themes. Different sections guide readers through Isaiah in a way that will help you discover, explore, experience, and share the heart of God more deeply. About the Passionate Life Bible Study Series: God longs for everyone to encounter the passion of his heart. Inspired by The Passion Translation, this heart-level Bible study is ideal for both individual devotional study and small groups. Kindle a burning desire for a passion-filled life fueled by the heart of God!
In his extremely thorough work on Isaiah, Robert Wilken brings to bear his considerable knowledge of early Christianity. Drawing on writings of the church fathers -- Eusebius of Caesarea, Ambrose, Jerome, Cyril of Alexandria, Theodoret of Cyrus, Bernard of Clairvaux, and nearly sixty others -- all of them masterfully translated, this work allows the complex words of Isaiah to come alive. Wilken's selection of ancient commentators clearly illuminates how Isaiah was used by the New Testament writers and understood by the early church fathers. Each chapter begins with a modern English translation of the septuagint, prepared by Moiss Silva. Editorial comments provide a foundation for understanding the excerpted commentaries and other writings that follow for each chapter. Isaiah: Interpreted by Early Christian and Medieval Commentators is ideal for devotional and spiritual reading and for a deeper understanding of the church's historical interpretation of this major prophet.

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