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Over fifty years after its founding, the European Court of Human Rights has dispensed more than 16,000 judgments and affects the lives of over 820 million people. The sixth edition of Jacobs, White and Ovey: The European Convention on Human Rights is a clear and concise companion to this increasingly important and extensive area of the law. Examining each of the Convention rights in turn, the text lays out the key principles relevant to both students and practitioners. Cutting throughthe ever-expanding web of cases, authors take you to the pivotal cases in each area and examine the principles that underpin the Court's decisions. A focus on the European Convention itself, rather than its implementation in any one member state, makes Jacobs, White and Ovey essential reading for all those interested in the work of the Strasbourg Court. Online Resource Centre The text is accompanied by an Online Resource Centre that features updates on cases and legislation since publication as well as links to useful websites and further reading on the European Convention.
Fifty years after the founding of the European Court of Human Rights it has dispensed more than 10,000 judgments and affects the lives of over 800 million people. The fifth edition of Jacobs, White & Ovey: The European Convention on Human Rights provides a clear and concise explanation of this increasingly important area of the law. Examining each of the Convention rights in turn, this book lays out the key principles relevant to both Human Rights students and practitioners. Fully updated with all the significant developments of the last four years, it offers a valuable synthesis of lively author commentary and carefully selected case law. By focussing on the European Convention itself rather than its implementation in any one member state this text may be counted as essential reading for all those interested in the work of the Strasbourg organs, while a revised structure ensures the book now maps even more closely to European Human Rights courses. The European Convention on Human Rights offers an accessible overview of Convention law and practice for scholars, lawyers and policy makers. It offers a comprehensive understanding of the work of the Strasbourg Court in interpreting and applying the Convention.
The seventh edition of Jacobs, White & Ovey: The European Convention on Human Rights is a clear and concise companion to this increasingly important and extensive area of the law. The authors examine each of the Convention rights in turn, explore the pivotal cases in each area and examine the principles that underpin the Court's decisions. The focus on the European Convention itself, rather than its implementation in any one member state, makes this book essential reading for all students looking for a concise yet authoritative overview of the work of the Strasbourg Court. Online Resource Centre The text is accompanied by an Online Resource Centre that features updates on cases and legislation since publication as well as links to useful websites and further reading on the European Convention.
4. The right to life.
The right to vote
This volume contains two manuals in both English and French on the topic of the wearing of religious symbols in public areas (written by Malcolm Evans) and hate speech (written by Anne Weber). The manuals fall within the scope of the Committee of Experts for the Development of Human Rights, and were prepared under the authority of the Steering Committee for Human Rights, as part of its work on human rights in a multicultural society. They were launched during the conference "Human Rights in culturally diverse societies: Challenges and perspectives" which was organised by the Council of Europe in The Hague, The Netherlands.
Tort law is often regarded as the clearest example of traditional common law reasoning. Yet, in the past 40 years, the common law of England and Wales has been subject to European influences as a result of the introduction of the European Communities Act 1972 and, more recently, the implementation of the Human Rights Act 1998 in October 2000. EU Directives have led to changes to the law relating to product liability, health and safety in the workplace, and defamation, while Francovich liability introduces a new tort imposing State liability for breach of EU law. The 1998 Act has led to developments in privacy law and made the courts reconsider their approach to public authority liability and freedom of expression in defamation law. This book explores how English tort law has changed as a result of Europeanisation - broadly defined as the influence of European Union and European human rights law. It also analyses how this influence has impacted on traditional common law reasoning. Has Europeanisation led to changes to the common law legal tradition or has the latter proved more resistant to change than might have been expected?

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