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This volume presents case studies of language learning beyond the classroom. The studies draw on a wide range of contexts, from North and South America to Europe and the Asia-Pacific region. Each provides principled links between theory, research and practice. While out-of-class learning will not replace the classroom, ultimately all successful learners take control of their own learning. This book shows how teachers can help learners bridge the gap between formal instruction and autonomous language learning. Although English is the primary focus of most chapters, there are studies on a range of other languages including Spanish and Japanese.
This book looks beyond the classroom, and focuses on out-of-class autonomous use of technology for language learning, discussing the theoretical frameworks, key findings and critical issues. The proliferation of digital language learning resources and tools is forcing language education into an era of unprecedented change. The book will stimulate discussions on how to support language learners to construct quality autonomous technology-mediated out-of-class learning experience outside the classroom and raise greater awareness of and research interest in this field. Out-of-class learning constitutes an important context for human development, and active engagement in out-of-class activities is associated with successful language development. With convenient access to expanded resources, venues and learning spaces, today's learners are not as dependent on in-class learning as they used to be. Thus, a deeper understanding of the terrain of out-of-class learning is of increasing significance in the current educational era. Technology is part and parcel of out-of-class language learning, and has been a primary source that learners actively use to construct language learning experience beyond the classroom. Language learners of all ages around the world have been found to actively utilize technological resources to support their language learning beyond formal language learning contexts. Insights into learners' out-of-class autonomous use of technology for language learning are essential to our understanding of out-of-class learning and inform educators on how language learners could be better supported to maximize the educational potentials of technology to construct quality out-of-class learning experience.
This volume presents case studies of language learning beyond the classroom. The studies draw on a wide range of contexts, from North and South America to Europe and the Asia-Pacific region. Each provides principled links between theory, research and practice. While out-of-class learning will not replace the classroom, ultimately all successful learners take control of their own learning. This book shows how teachers can help learners bridge the gap between formal instruction and autonomous language learning. Although English is the primary focus of most chapters, there are studies on a range of other languages including Spanish and Japanese.
This book explores the history of the unschooling movement and the forces shaping the trajectory of the movement in current times. As an increasing number of families choose to unschool, it becomes important to further study this philosophical and educational movement. It is also essential to ascribe theory to the movement, to gain greater understanding of its workings as well as to increase the legitimacy of unschooling itself. In this book, Riley provides a useful overview of the unschooling movement, grounding her study in the choices and challenges facing families as they consider different paths towards educating their children outside of traditional school systems.
This book explores the implementation of an online representational tool, GroupScribbles, in Chinese-as-a-second-language classrooms from primary school to secondary school. It demonstrates the effectiveness of combining online representational tools with face-to-face classroom learning, and provides a workable approach to analysing interactions interweaving social and cognitive dimensions, which take place in the networked classroom. A series of suggestions regarding networked second language learning will help educators effectively implement information and communication technology tools in the classroom.
The participants were ten international students who enrolled in a ten-week pre-university English course at a university English Language Centre. This qualitative research was conducted through multiple data sources; namely, semi-structured in-depth interviews, diaries, and class observation. Narrative inquiry is employed as the method for analysing the data.
This book examines a wide range of innovations in language learning and teaching in Japan. Each of the chapters describes the impetus for a change or new development in a particular context, from early childhood to adult learning, details its implementation and provides an evaluation of its success. In doing so, they provide a comprehensive overview of best practice in innovating language education from teaching practice in formal classroom settings, to self-directed learning beyond the classroom, and offer recommendations to enhance language education in Japan and beyond. The book will be of interest to scholars of applied linguistics and language development, and in particular to those involved in managing change in language education that attempts to mediate between global trends and local needs.
Social spaces for language learning, places where learners can come together in order to learn with and from each other, have an important role to play in foreign language acquisition and L2 identity development. In this book, sixteen students, teachers and administrators tell how they experience the L-café, a social language learning space located on the campus of a Japanese university. As part of a narrative inquiry, their unabridged stories are framed by background information on the study and an in-depth analysis informed by theories of space and place, and complex dynamic systems. Addressing practical as well as theoretical concerns, this book provides advice for language professionals developing and managing social language learning spaces, pedagogical insights for teachers exploring their role in out-of-class learning, and direction for researchers examining the various facets of language learning beyond the classroom.
This study describes an attempt of using an educational social networking platform, which is called Edmodo, for English language learning outside classrooms at tertiary level. Considering the notion of communicative competence, the instructor incorporated Edmodo into his English classes as a project which is a formal assignment. In the project, the students posted their self-introduction in English and replied to other students' postings on Edmodo and they then wrote feedback on their tasks. The students' feedback demonstrated that the use of Edmodo held a number of positive aspects which support the previous studies identified that students can develop their communication networks with other students. In English language learning Edmodo also had an opportunity to enhance the development of the students' communicative competence. The current Edmodo project enabled the instructor to acknowledge the importance of authentic opportunities to use English with new technology.
Social spaces for language learning, places where learners can come together in order to learn with and from each other, have an important role to play in foreign language acquisition and L2 identity development. In this book, sixteen students, teachers and administrators tell how they experience the L-cafe, a social language learning space located on the campus of a Japanese university. As part of a narrative inquiry, their unabridged stories are framed by background information on the study and an in-depth analysis informed by theories of space and place, and complex dynamic systems. Addressing practical as well as theoretical concerns, this book provides advice for language professionals developing and managing social language learning spaces, pedagogical insights for teachers exploring their role in out-of-class learning, and direction for researchers examining the various facets of language learning beyond the classroom."
Chiefly papers presented at the 10th International Colloquium on Foreign Language Teaching, hosted by the Centre for Applied Language Studies at the University of Limerick on 11-12 June 2005.
Language beyond the Classroom is an edited volume of essays that offers detailed, how-to guides for developing, implementing, and evaluating service-learning programs for a variety of languages. Contributions here present civic-engagement programs for several languages, including French, German, Russian, and Spanish, with curricula that can be adapted to any language program. The authors of each essay engage with the growing pedagogical emphasis on experiential learning, providing theoretical and practical advice, including syllabi, for language educators. Language beyond the Classroom is a timely exploration of the variety and richness of service-learning in language instruction, and contributes to a 21st-century emphasis on community engagement and cultural contextualization in second-language pedagogy.
This volume seeks to provide a broader interpretation for language learners, teachers and researchers who are increasingly involved in language learning beyond the traditional environment of the classroom.
Faces of English Education provides an accessible, wide-ranging introduction to current perspectives on English language education, covering new areas of interest and recent studies in the field. In seventeen specially commissioned chapters written by international experts and practitioners, this book: offers an authoritative discussion of theoretical issues and debates surrounding key topics such as identity, motivation, teacher education and classroom pedagogy; discusses teaching from the perspective of the student as well as the teacher, and features sections on both in- and out-of-class learning; showcases the latest teaching research and methods, including MOOCs, use of corpora, and blended learning, and addresses the interface between theory and practice; analyses the different ways and contexts in which English is taught, learned and used around the world. Faces of English Education is essential reading for pre- and in-service teachers, researchers in TESOL and applied linguistics, and teacher educators, as well as upper undergraduate and postgraduate students studying related topics.
With the rise of the internet and new communication technologies, language learning has moved beyond the classroom walls. This volume presents a range of important studies on innovative ways for learning languages outside the classroom. Chapters discuss MOOCs in the UK, Belgium, China, and Italy for studying a range of languages, research on new apps, flipped classroom modes, and approaches to informal learning in a range of international settings. In these ways, the volume offers a significant contribution to our understanding of how learning beyond the language classroom will transform language education in the decades to come.
Publisher's description: In this original book, B. Kumaravadivelu presents a macrostrategic framework designed to help both beginning and experienced teachers develop a systematic, coherent, and personal theory of practice. His book provides the tools a teacher needs in order to self-observe, self-analyze, and self-evaluate his or her own teaching acts. The framework consists of ten macrostrategies based on current theoretical, empirical, and experiential knowledge of second language and foreign language teaching. These strategies enable teachers to evaluate classroom practices and to generate techniques and activities for realizing teaching goals. With checklists, surveys, projects, and reflective tasks to encourage critical thinking, the book is both practical and accessible. Teachers and future teachers, researchers, and teacher educators will find the volume indispensable.
Teaching Learners of English in Mainstream Classrooms is a unique resource designed to help K-8 classroom teachers integrate language learning into the content curriculum. This book helps teachers teach their grade level curriculum even though they may have English language learners in their classrooms. By using the strategies provided, teachers can promote content achievement for all of their students. Specificially written for content teachers, Linda New Levine and Mary Lou McCloskey's clear and friendly writing style emphasizes practical application of known second language learning principles. The authors offer classroom teachers practical strategies and tools to integrate content and language learning, accelerating the academic achievement of their students. Techniques for developing reading writing and speaking skills in the content areas are also emphasized.
In ten chapters, Beyond Methods introduces language teachers, teacher educators, and curriculum developers to the latest research findings in linguistics and second language acquisition, while offering a theoretical basis for making decisions about such things as methods, syllabus design, and assessment. Written for novice and experienced teachers alike, Beyond Methods is intended for courses on the teaching of any language as well as for courses in applied linguistics. Thought-provoking questions and suggested readings guide readers in their exploration of the topics.

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