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This book presents a distinctive approach to the study of law in society, focusing on the sociological interpretation of legal ideas. It surveys the development of connections between legal studies and social theory and locates its approach in relation to sociolegal studies on the one hand and legal philosophy on the other. It is suggested that the concept of law must be re-considered. Law has to be seen today not just as the law of the nation state, or international law that links nation states, but also as transnational law in many forms. A legal pluralist approach is not just a matter of redefining law in legal theory; it also recognizes that law's authority comes from a plurality of diverse, sometimes conflicting, social sources. The book suggests that the social environment in which law operates must also be rethought, with many implications for comparative legal studies. The nature and boundaries of culture become important problems, while the concept of multiculturalism points to the cultural diversity of populations and to problems of fragmentation, or perhaps to new kinds of unity of the social. Theories of globalization raise a host of issues about the integrity of societies and about the need to understand social networks and forces that extend beyond the political societies of nation states. Through a range of specific studies, closely interrelated and building on each other, the book seeks to integrate the sociology of law with other kinds of legal analysis and engages directly with current juristic debates in legal theory and comparative law.
"A classic collection in the anthropology of law. While some exceptionally good descriptive work is presented, the volume is particularly valuable in providing a range of thoughtful, engaged, and empirically grounded theoretical explorations of issues in the comparative study of law and conflict."—Donald Brenneis, author of Dangerous Words
This volume addresses the pluralistic identity of the legal order. It argues that the mutual reflexivity of the different ways society perceives law and law perceives society eclipses the unique formal identity of written law. It advances a distinctive approach to the plural ways in which legal cultures work in a modern society, through the metaphor of the mirror. As a mirror of society, it distinguishes between the structure and function of legal culture within the legal system, and the external representation of law in society. This duality is further problematized in relation to the increasing transnationalisation of law. Based on a multi-level interpretation of the concept of legal culture, the work is divided into three parts: the first addresses the mutual reflections of social and legal norms that support a pluralist representation of internal legal cultures, the second concentrates on the external legal cultures that constantly enable pragmatic adjustments of the legal order to its social environment, and the third concludes the book with a theoretical discussion of the issues presented.
The historical-critical edition of Max Weber's writings on sociology of law (MWG I/22-3) revealed deep layers of Max Weber's legal texts that thus became readable for the first time. Weber breaks out from the legal centrism of the normative world and designs an Interpretation that follows the "world history of law" in a cultural-comparative sense, thereby making him appear particularly topical for today's debates on the relationship between globalization and legal analysis. With his text "Die Wirtschaft und die Ordnungen" ("Economics and the Orders"), Weber anticipated the idea of "legal pluralism" that emphasizes the diversity ofnormative orders. Further, the departure from the occidental development path of law towards the "developmental conditions of law" opens up the cognitive horizon for insights into other legal cultures, their interferences and hybridizations for which we still seem to lack the categories today. It is, then, all the more remarkable how Weber designed a great, all-encompassing meta-narrative on legal rationalism in the Occident based on a multitude of highly branched out legal histories - a narrative that can only be told through the perspective of universal history and with the world cultures of law in mind. This interpretation also captures the birth of sociology from the spirit of jurisprudence - so impressively detailed in Weber's work - that accords particular importance to law in the analysis of modernities.
Comparative legal studies are at last commanding the thoughts of contemporary jurists� Alice ES Tay. Drawing on an impressive ancestry in comparative law, the 22 contributions in this volume by authors from Asia, Australia and Europe go further in their complex conception of law and culture. They look at the new principles and concepts of a transnational, global law in new, multiple contexts and in diverse juxtapositions with new institutions and authorities. In an unplanned but cohesive pattern the individual contributions together open a fresh vision of the use and value of comparative legal studies for the assessment of the function and limitations of the law of a global society.
What happens to legal thought when key terms-society, culture, power, justice, identity-become unsettled? With the boundaries defining sociolegal scholarship undergoing a profound shift, this book explores the intersections of law, culture, and identity. Sexuality, race, sports, and the politics of policing are among the topics the authors take up as they examine how law both reproduces and challenges fundamental notions of order, discipline, and identity. Contributors: Rosemary J. Coombe, U of Toronto; David M. Engel, SUNY, Buffalo; Marjorie Garber, Harvard U; Herman Gray, UC, Santa Cruz; Rona Tamiko Halualani, San José State U; David Harvey, CUNY; Deb Henderson; Yuen J. Huo, UCLA; S. Lily Mendoza, U of Denver; Trish Oberweis, American Justice Institute; Paul A. Passavant, Hobart and William Smith Colleges; Lisa E. Sanchez, U of Illinois; Carl F. Stychin, U of Reading; Tom R. Tyler, New York U; Christine A. Yalda.
"Oscar G. Chase studies the American legal system in the manner of an anthropologist. By comparing American 'dispute ways' with those of other systems, including some commonly believed to be more 'primitive, ' he finds interesting similarities that challenge the premise that we live in a society regulated by a rational and just 'rule of law.'" --New York Law Journal"A witty and engaging endeavor. . . . A good contribution to our professional knowledge, and it is a must reading." --Law and Politics Book Review"After reading Law, Culture, and Ritual, no one could ever again think that our legal proceedings are nothing more than an efficient method of discovering truth and applying law. Oscar Chase effectively uses a comparative approach to help us to step back from our legal practices and see just how steeped in myths, rituals and traditions they are. Scholars will want to read this book for its contribution to comparative law, but everyone interested in American culture should read this book. Chase shows us that there is no separating law from culture: each informs and maintains the other. Law, Culture, and Ritual is a major step forward in the rapidly expanding field of the cultural study of law." --Paul Kahn, author of The Cultural Study of Law: Reconstructing Legal Scholarship"Having allowed ourselves to be convinced (wrongly) that we are the most litigious people in the world, Americans have become obsessed with finding (quick) cures. Oscar Chase's book sounds a salutary warning. By presenting striking comparative examples that shatter our parochialism, he forces us to examine the cultural roots of dispute processes." --Richard Abel, Connell Professor of Law, UCLA LawSchoolDisputing systems are products of the societies in which they operate - they originate and mutate in respons
How has Japan managed to become one of the most important economic actors in the world, without the corresponding legal infrastructure usually associated with complex economic activities? The Changing Role of Law in Japan offers a comparative perspecti
This is a collection of essays on general and specific topics of comparative private and comparative public law by distinguished legal scholars from every part of the world in honour to the work of Alice Ehr-Soon Tay. The essays demonstrate the changing approach to common law in legal culture and present a body of texts on comparative law problems arching from Asia to Europe to Australia. The volume furthermore indicates that there is no area where comparative law has proved more dominant and useful than in regard to human rights and comparative constitutional analysis. Finally, this book is an outstanding cross-cultural contribution to comparative private law and comparative constitutional law in terms of understanding legal culture and law. It will be invaluable to all those who practise, teach or judge law. Articles by Kim Santow, Saul Fridman, W. M. C. Gummow, J. A. Jolowicz, Hiroshi Matsuo, Ivan Shearer, Christopher Birch, Tom Campbell, Roland Drago, Jennifer Hill, Michael Kirby, Karin Lemercier, Aleksander Peczenik, Robert S. Summers, Albert H.Y. Chen, Jianfu Chen, Edward McWhinney, Eric Smithburn, Klaus A. Ziegert, Margaret Allars, Han Depei, Guenther Doeker-Mach, Hoang Van Hao, Tommy Koh, Adam Lopatka, Gabriel A. Moens, Cao Duc Thai, Wang Gungwu, Peter Wesley-Smith, Murray Gleeson, Julia Horne List of Publications of Alice Erh-Soon-Tay .
Historically, Israel's Supreme Court has failed to limit the state's powers of expropriation and to protect private property. This book argues that the Court's land expropriation jurisprudence can only be understood against the political, cultural and institutional context in which it was shaped. Security and economic pressures, the precarious status of the Court in the early years, the pervading ethos of collectivism, the cultural symbolism of public land ownership and the perceived strategic and demographic risks posed by the Israeli Arab population - all contributed to the creation of a harsh and arguably undemocratic land expropriation legal philosophy. This philosophy, the book argues, was applied by the Supreme Court to Arabs and Jews alike from the creation of the state in 1948 and until the 1980s. The book concludes with an analysis of the constitutional change of 1992 and its impact on the legal treatment of property rights under Israeli law.
Law as Culture is a beguilingly accessible, lively and engaging introduction to the law and to legal skills, complete with innovative skills exercises and even some cartoons. It gives the reader a framework for subsequent legal study and for professional life by demystifying the language and culture of the law and by building legal skills. The Extracts, Preface to the 2nd edn and Skills Inventory (below, link above), clearly outline the many strengths of this edition. The book shows how law students are socialised into professional legal culture, and encourages independent thought. It highlights the ways in which law reflects social values and priorities, the place of law as one among many systems of social organisation and problem-solving, and the rise of lawyers as a subculture. This edition has been extensively revised to take account of developments in law such as the results of the 1999 Referendum on the Republic, the debates about a Bill of Rights for Australia, and changes to legal professional practice. The jurisdictional reach has been extended to look at cases and legislation from all Australian States. Black/White relations has been introduced as a recurring theme - materials on Aboriginal Reconciliation, the Wik judgment and the legal and political debate over the Stolen Generations give continuity and perspective. Law as Culture includes clear and accessible accounts of key jurisprudential issues and an extended introduction which sets out the pedagogical assumptions. There are cases and legislation from all Australian States, thorough referencing, and an annotated list of Further Reading in each chapter.
Drawing on philosophers from Plato to Foucault and cultural anthropologists and historians such as Clifford Geertz and Perry Miller, Kahn outlines the conceptual tools necessary for such an inquiry. He analyzes the concepts of time, space, citizen, judge, sovereignty, and theory within the culture of law's rule and goes on to consider the methodological problems entailed in stripping the study of law of its reformist ambitions.
The first full-scale study of the actual operations of the actual operations of a modern Islamic law court anywhere in the Arab world.
A 2002 analysis of Islamic law as it was imposed on the people of the medieval Maghrib.
This exciting new undergraduate textbook introduces the reader to the broad and complex relationship between sport, culture and society, and critically examines the key assumptions that we hold with regard to the nature of sport.
For law students and lawyers to successfully understand and practice law in the U.S., recognition of the wider context and culture which informs the law is essential. Simply learning the legal rules and procedures in isolation is not enough without an appreciation of the culture that produced them. This book provides the reader with an understandable introduction to the ways in which U.S. law reflects its culture and each chapter begins with questions to guide the reader, and concludes with questions for review, challenge and further understanding. Kirk W. Junker explores cultural differences, employing history, social theory, philosophy, and language as "reference frames," which are then applied to the rules and procedures of the U.S. legal system in the book’s final chapter. Through these cultural reference frames readers are provided with a set of interpretive tools to inform their understanding of the substance and institutions of the law. With a deeper understanding of this cultural context, international students will be empowered to more quickly adapt to their studies; more comprehensively understand the role of the attorney in the U.S. system; draw comparisons with their own domestic legal systems, and ultimately become more successful in their legal careers both in the U.S. and abroad.
The changes in communication technology have hugely increased the interaction over geographical distances; hence given rise to new kinds of social relations in need of legal regulation by transnational law law valid across the jurisdictional borders of the nation state, and applied within. Law is therefore no longer mainly a national matter, and without an understanding of different legal cultures, the perception of the contemporary legal order will be incomplete. In the present era of internationalisation of law, the purpose of applying legal culture as an analytical tool is, in short, to make different notions of law and how law operates in society understandable to such an extent that they do not form obstacles for cooperation. This approach to legal culture takes it out of a purely academic setting and into the legal world outside the ivory tower. This means taking legal culture out of books and into action. This book aims at supplying the reader with tools to operationalize legal cultural knowledge in the everyday operations of law. In other words, the book you hold in your hands right now is produced with the ambition of managing the unmanageable concept of legal culture, and by this making it applicable when deciding the content of law.

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