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When we tell kids to complete an assignment, we get compliance. When we empower learners to explore and learn how to make an impact on the world, we inspire problem solvers and innovators.
"Place: it's where we're from; it's where we're going. . . . It asks for our attention and care. If we pay attention, place has much to teach us." With this belief as a foundation, The Power of Place offers a comprehensive and compelling case for making communities the locus of learning for students of all ages and backgrounds. Dispelling the notion that place-based education is an approach limited to those who can afford it, the authors describe how schools in diverse contexts—urban and rural, public and private—have adopted place-based programs as a way to better engage students and attain three important goals of education: student agency, equity, and community. This book identifies six defining principles of place-based education. Namely, it 1. Embeds learning everywhere and views the community as a classroom. 2. Is centered on individual learners. 3. Is inquiry based to help students develop an understanding of their place in the world. 4. Incorporates local and global thinking and investigations. 5. Requires design thinking to find solutions to authentic problems. 6. Is interdisciplinary. For each principle, the authors share stories of students whose lives were transformed by their experiences in place-based programs, elaborate on what the principle means, demonstrate what it looks like in practice by presenting case studies from schools throughout the United States, and offer action steps for implementation. Aimed at educators from preK through high school, The Power of Place is a definitive guide to developing programs that will lead to successful outcomes for students, more fulfilling careers for teachers, and lasting benefits for communities.
Gain a clear understanding of what effective teachers do—and how successful students learn Over the past 20 years, a greater concentration on research aimed at both teaching and learning has revealed that “chalk and talk” teaching, copying notes, and “cookbook” practical lessons offer little challenge to students. Teaching in the Sciences: Learner-Centered Approaches steers the learning process away from traditional modes of instruction to a more student-centered, activity-based curriculum that makes science relevant, engaging, and interesting. This innovative book helps educators bring out the best in their students—and themselves—by identifying and meeting students’ needs and providing environments that encourage active, strategic learning. Helpful tables and figures make complex information easy to access and understand. Rather than focusing on teaching methods that merely deal in the content of life science, Teaching in the Sciences: Learner-Centered Approaches promotes a deep learning designed to develop critical and skilled learners. This collection of frank and thoughtful empirically based papers places greater emphasis on learning environments and social interaction patterns, assessment processes, and perceptions of students and teachers in a range of learning and teaching settings in the life sciences. The book presents strategies for mentoring and assessing students, assessments of learning outcomes, innovative approaches to curriculum design, constructivist approaches to teaching science, how to use technology to support learning, and practical examples of learner-centered teaching that mark important steps on a journey to transform the learning process. Teaching in the Sciences: Learner-Centered Approaches examines: using broadband videoconferencing for distance learning in tertiary science assessing for learning in the crucial first year of university studies using Information and Communication Technology (ICT) in molecular science applying ICT to provide student feedback teaching biostatistics in the environmental life sciences developing metacognition and problem-solving skills in students the evolution of metAHEAD, an online resource that supports strategy development and self-monitoring in problem solving the development of a problem-based learning approach (PBL) for students in environmental science and natural resource management and much more! While largely centered on the context of undergraduate science instruction, Teaching in the Sciences: Learner-Centered Approaches is filled with valuable lessons for all educators working with students in the pursuit of powerful, effective, and lasting learning.
Research in the area of teaching and learning within education is a dynamic area that continues to evolve because of new technologies, knowledge, models, and methods within formal and non-formal educational settings. It is essential to evaluate the changes that educational systems undergo as they adapt to the increasing use of the technology and the flattening of access to education from an international perspective. Redesigning Teaching, Leadership, and Indigenous Education in the 21st Century is a cutting-edge research publication that provides comprehensive research on the amalgamation of teaching and learning practices at each level of the education system. Highlighting a range of topics such as bibliometrics, indigenous studies, and professional development, this book is ideal for academicians, education professionals, administrators, curriculum developers, classroom designers, professionals, researchers, and students.
Praise for The Learner-Centered Curriculum "Cullen, Harris, and Hill provide a clear and practical framework for addressing the root of the problems of today's universities. The authors provide a lucid, actionable, and evidence-based prescription for building an integrated learning system to replace the hodgepodge of miscellany that we have inherited. They illustrate the kind of conversations and transformations that could raise the value of and change the prospects for higher education."—John Tagg, author, The Learning Paradigm College "This book offers a powerful, realistic, and much-needed plan for changing how learning happens in higher education. Anyone concerned about improving teaching and students' learning needs to read this book!"—Terry Doyle, author, Helping Students Learn in a Learner-Centered Environment "To help achieve the imperative to make our universities more learner-centered, the authors focus on curriculum redesign and offer a solid theoretical approach combined with applied skills that institutional leaders and faculty can use to attain their goals. Shared governance, autonomous learning, assessment, technology, and physical space are among the elements discussed in this excellent book that universities will need to consider when developing a new curriculum that is more learner-centered."—Jolene Koester, president, California State University, Northridge "Cullen, Harris, and Hill provide a thought-provoking resource with the compelling advantages and frameworks to create twenty-first-century student-centered, knowledge-centered, assessment-centered, and community-centered curriculum. This is a must-read for faculty and administrators committed to transforming their curriculum in order to educate better prepared graduates."—Deborah L. Ford, chancellor, University of Wisconsin-Parkside "This is the book that I have been looking for. Written by three leaders who have done the heavy lifting of leading real change, it's a book for every academic leader who understands that innovation is essential to the future of higher education."—Earl H. Potter, III, president, St. Cloud State University
Before entering higher education, most students' learning experiences have been traditional and teacher-centered. Their teachers have typically controlled their learning, with students having had little say about what and how to learn. For many students, encountering a learner-centered environment will be new, possibly unsettling, and may even engender resistance and hostility. Taking as his starting point students' attitudes toward, and unfamiliarity with, learner-centered classrooms, Terry Doyle explains that motivating students to engage with this practice first of all requires explaining its underlying rationale, and then providing guidance on how to learn in this environment. This book is about how to help students acquire the new skills and knowledge they need to take on unfamiliar roles and responsibilities. It is informed by the author's extensive experience in managing learner-centered classes, and by his consultation work with faculty. The first four chapters focus on the importance of imparting to students the evidence and underlying philosophy that is driving higher education to move from a teacher-centered to a learner-centered practice, and what this means for students in terms of having control over, and making important choices about, their learning. The final eight chapters focus on how to impart the skills that students need to learn or hone if they are to be effective learners in an environment that is new to them. The book covers such practices as learning on one's own; creating meaningful learning when collaborating with others; peer teaching; making presentations; developing life long learning skills; self and peer evaluation; and give meaningful feedback. This book provides a rich and informative answer to the fundamental question: how do I help my students adjust to a learner-centered practice?
Integrated curricula...commonsence connections---Thoughtful instruction...teaching with rigor and vigor---Active learning...I teach, but you must learn---Reflective transfer...teach them to fish---Authentic assessment...the measure of man.
As e-learning has evolved into a global change agent in higher education, it has become more diverse in its form and applications. Now that many institutions have implemented e-learning programs as part of their course offerings, it is essential for these institutions to fully grasp how best to facilitate continued improvements and accessibility in online education. The Handbook of Research on Building, Growing, and Sustaining Quality E-Learning Programs highlights several significant elements of e-learning, including program planning, quality standards, and online course development, as well as institutional, student, and faculty support. Serving as a critical resource for online and hybrid learning programs, this publication is designed for use by administrators, educators, instructional designers, and doctorate-level students in the field of education.
English language teaching methods and language learning styles have changed dramatically over the past decade in Asia and the surrounding regions. Huge efforts are being made by teachers from the K-12 system, as well as at the tertiary level, to move away from the traditional Grammar-Translation Method towards more communicative approaches to teaching and learning, including the use of project – and task-based learning and technology-enhanced language learning, just to name a few of the more frequently used methodologies. In this book, the authors shed light on the changes in ELT in Asia and the region over the past 10 years or so as seen in the wider context of language policy, which puts greater value on the acquisition of English and the new directions in learner-centered classrooms which encourage student autonomy and voice and place students as active decision-makers in the learning process.With the title of “Departing from Tradition: Innovations in English Language Teaching and Learning”, this book showcases some of the innovations in ELT that are currently happening in this rapidly growing field. Given the growing importance of English and the enormous energy and enthusiasm in the region for learning the language in both formal and informal contexts, ELT will continue to flourish. This volume will offer insights into the tremendous changes that have been made in secondary and university English language classrooms across the region.
This book presents the research-based case that Learner Centered Teaching (LCT) offers the best means to optimize student learning in college, and offers examples and ideas for putting it into practice, as well the underlying rationale. It also starts from the premise that many faculty are much closer to being learner centered teachers than they think, but don’t have the full conceptual understanding of the process to achieve its full impact. There is sometimes a gap between what we would like to achieve in our teaching and the knowledge and strategies needed to make it happen. LCT keeps all of the good features of a teacher-centered approach and applies them in ways that are in better harmony with how our brains learn. It, for instance, embraces the teacher as expert as well as the appropriate use of lecture, while also offering new, effective ways to replace practices that don’t optimizing student learning. Neuroscience, biology and cognitive science research have made it clear that it is the one who does the work who does the learning. Many faculty do too much of the work for their students, which results in diminished student learning. To enable faculty to navigate this shift, Terry Doyle presents an LCT-based approach to course design that draws on current brain research on cognition and learning; on addressing the affective concerns of students; on proven approaches to improve student’s comprehension and recall; on transitioning from “teller of knowledge” to a “facilitator of learning”; on the design of authentic assessment strategies – such as engaging students in learning experiences that model the real world work they will be asked to do when they graduate; and on successful communication techniques. The presentation is informed by the questions and concerns raised by faculty from over sixty colleges with whom Terry Doyle has worked; and on the response from an equal number of regional, national and international conferences at which he has presented on topics related to LCT.
This innovative resource introduces a transformative leadership model that supports student development by focusing on key factors such as cognition, metacognition, motivation, affect, and individual differences.
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First Published in 2008. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
This updated edition helps beginning and experienced teachers build vocabulary skills, promote student interaction with relevant activities, strengthen fluency and comprehension, and produce meaningful student assessments.
In Learner-Centered Leadership, Vodicka offers a deeply researched and urgent blueprint for orienting education around the strengths, interests, and needs of individual learners. He makes a compelling argument for the wisdom in giving students the resources to draw their own learning paths and the power of reimagining schools.
Merging the Instructional Design Process with Learner-Centered Theory brings together the innovations of two previously divided processes — learning design strategies/theories and instructional systems development — into a new introductory textbook. Using a holistic rather than fragmented approach that includes top-level, mid-level, and lower-level design, this book provides guidance for major topics such as non-instructional interventions, just-in-time analysis, rapid-prototype approaches, and learner-centered, project-based, anytime-anywhere instruction. Informed by the authors’ considerable experience and leadership throughout dramatic shifts in today’s learning landscape, this book offers the next generation of instructional designers a fresh perspective that synthesizes and pushes beyond the basics of design and development.

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