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A skillful, and frequently hilarious, comparison of Mark Twain and the author, Richard Bissell. Part commentary and part autobiography, Bissell deftly interweaves family history, anecdotes, and career paths into an unforgettable linking of two outstanding authors and river boat buffs living almost a century apart.
Excerpt from 60 Years on the Upper Mississippi: My Life and Experiences Whatever education [received outside of the ih struction I received from my father, I acquired at the little log school house under the hill, two miles from my home. After I was 12 years old I stayed at homein the summer and fall helping my father on the farm, attending school only three months in the' winter, and such winters as we then had - the snow usually three to four feet deep often covering the fences all out of sight.' The school house was made out of rough logs, the spaces between being stopped with mortar made from clay. The seats were made from pine slabs, the rounded side down, supported with stout oak pins. The writing desk was a rough long one, occupylng the whole rear of the house. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.
Discusses the lives and careers of Whitman, Twain, Dreiser, Hemingway, and DosPassos, each of whom began as journalists
-With 55 original Illustrations by Lester Ralph. -Table of contents to every chapters in the book. -Complete and formatted to improve your reading experience Eve's Diary is a comic short story by Mark Twain. It was first published in the 1905 Christmas issue of the magazine Harper's Bazaar, and in book format in June 1906 by Harper and Brothers[1] publishing house. It is written in the style of a diary kept by the first woman in the biblical creation story, Eve, and is claimed to be "translated from the original MS." The "plot" of this novel is the first-person account of Eve from her creation up to her burial by, her mate, Adam, including meeting and getting to know Adam, and exploring the world around her, Eden. The story then jumps 40 years into the future after the Fall and expulsion from Eden. It is one of a series of books Twain wrote concerning the story of Adam and Eve, including 'Extracts from Adam's Diary,' 'That Day In Eden,' 'Eve Speaks,' 'Adam's Soliloquy,' and the 'Autobiography of Eve.' Eve's Diary has a lighter tone than the others in the series, as Eve has a strong appreciation for beauty and love. The book may have been written as a posthumous love-letter to Mark Twain's wife Olivia Langdon Clemens, or Livy, who died in June 1904, just before the story was written. Mark Twain is quoted as saying, "Eve's Diary is finished — I've been waiting for her to speak, but she doesn't say anything more." The story ends with Adam's speaking at Eve's grave, "Wherever she was, there was Eden." The book version of the story was published with 55 illustrations by Lester Ralph, on each left hand page. The illustrations depicted Eve and Adam in their natural settings. The depiction of an unclothed woman was considered pornographic when the book was first released in the United States, and created a controversy around the book. One library in Charlton, Massachusetts banned the book for the depictions of Eve in "summer costume." When contacted Twain replied: “ The action of the Charlton library was not of the slightest interest to me. ” Two weeks later, after testifying before Congress, he elaborated as reported in the Washington Herald, “ The whole episode has rather amused me. I have no feeling of vindictiveness over the stand of the librarians there — I am only amused. You see they did not object to my book; they objected to Lester Ralph's pictures. I wrote the book; I did not make the pictures. I admire the pictures, and I heartily approve them, but I did not make them. It seems curious to me — some of the incidents in this case. It appears that the pictures in Eve's Diary were first discovered by a lady librarian. When she made the dreadful find, being very careful, she jumped at no hasty conclusions — not she — she examined the horrid things in detail. It took her some time to examine them all, but she did her hateful duty! I don't blame her for this careful examination; the time she spent was, I am sure, enjoyable, for I found considerable fascination in them myself. Then she took the book to another librarian, a male this time, and he, also, took a long time to examine the unclothed ladies. He must have found something of the same sort of fascination in them that I found… ” In a letter to a friend, Harriett E. Whitmore, he commented: “ the truth is, that when a Library expels a book of mine and leaves an unexpurgated Bible lying around where unprotected youth and age can get hold of it, the deep unconscious irony of it delights me and doesn't anger me.
Excerpt from Extracts From Adam's Diary: Translated From the Original Ms. Den fruit was not apples, it was chest nuts. I said I was innocent, then, for I had not eaten any chestnuts. She said the Serpent informed her that chestnut was a figurative term meaning an aged and mouldy joke. I turned pale at that, for I have made many jokes to pass the weary time, and some of them could have been of that sort, though I had honestly supposed that they were new when I made them. She asked me if I had made one just at the time of the catastrophe. I was obliged to admit that I had made one to my self, though not aloud. It was this. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.
Excerpt from The Illinois-Iowa Jewish Community on the Banks of the Mississippi River The story that will be told has an important purpose. It will tell about the Jewish people in the l83o's, the earliest days of the Western frontier. We will try to discover what kind of Jews came to the frontier, why they came, how they lived as Jews, the institutions they created which would serve their needs, why they left their native lands, how their Jewish life developed and what they contributed to the growth of the cities in which they came to live as American Jews. The period to be covered begins about 1833 and will cover in detail the events until about 1925. It is the earliest period that is most valuable as the availability of the oldest record becomes more difficult each year. The data after 1900 are somewhat easier to obtain. A brief summary of communal developments from 1925 to 1950 will be included as a matter of interest for each community. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.

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