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Not long after winning their independence from Mexico in 1836, Texans began clamoring for lighthouses. Hundreds of miles of barrier islands, shifting sandbars, and shallow bays made the Texas coast treacherous at a time when few overland routes provided access to the new republic. Beginning in 1852, twenty-eight lighthouses were built along the Texas coastline, on land and over water. Lighthouse service was often a family affair, with husbands, wives, and children working together as keepers and assistants. For nearly 70 years, construction continued as coastal erosion, hurricanes, and wars regularly damaged or destroyed those lighthouses already built. These "sentinels of the sea" lessened but did not eliminate the chance of shipwreck, so lifesaving stations, manned by able seamen with unsinkable surfboats, were established as well. As Texas's lighthouses were gradually automated throughout the 20th century, many were sold to private owners or abandoned. Today, several have been restored, and two--at Aransas Pass and Port Isabel--still function as aids to navigation.
Gives the history of lighthouses in the state of Texas as well as the life and work of the keepers and their families.
Like everything in the Lone Star State, the history of Texas is larger than life. The flags of six different nations have flown over the state, which had a rich Native American heritage long before European explorers such as Cabeza de Vaca, Coronado, and La Salle ever arrived. The state was even its own republic, achieving independence from Mexico in 1836, yet joined the United States in 1845. Author Karen Bush Gibson tells the 500-year saga of this unique state, from the founding of the Spanish Missions to the victory at San Jacinto, from the Civil War to the first oil gusher at Spindletop, from the Great Storm that destroyed Galveston to the establishment of NASA's Mission Control in Houston. Texas History for Kids also includes 21 informative and fun activities to help readers better understand the state's culture, politics, and geography. Kids will recreate one of the six flags to fly over Texas, make castings of local wildlife tracks, design a ranch's branding iron, celebrate Juneteenth by reciting General Order Number 3, build a miniature Battle of Flowers float, and more. This valuable resource also includes a time line of significant events, a list of historic sites to visit or explore online, and Web resources for further study. Karen Bush Gibson is the author of Women in Space, Women Aviators, Native American History for Kids, and three dozen other books for young readers. She lives in Norman, Oklahoma.
A companion volume to his "Ghost Towns of Texas, More Ghost Towns of Texas" provides readers with comprehensive descriptions, histories, maps, and detailed directions to the most interesting ghost towns in Texas not already covered in the first volume. 199 illustrations. 95 maps.
The cold, stygian dark of the extreme sea depths is home to some of our planet’s strangest creatures. Even their names evoke a science fiction adventure: dragonfishes, greeneyes, viperfishes, mirrorbellies, lanternfishes. Marine biologist Henry “Hank” Compton (1928–2005) of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department’s Rockport Marine Lab was present on some of the earliest Gulf of Mexico cruises on which these fishes were collected for the first time in Texas waters. Upon returning, Compton would retire to the darkroom he had constructed beneath a stairwell at the lab and photograph the specimens. A talented artist, Compton then painted watercolors based on his photographs. He allowed free rein to both his scientific judgment and his artistic vision as he constructed representations of how the specimens might have appeared in the crushing pressure of their alien environment. Compton dubbed the series of deep-water paintings “Fire in the Sea” because of the shimmering bioluminescence common to these deep-water species. Then, along with taxonomic descriptions, he drafted fanciful narratives to accompany the paintings: quirky, humorous, and sometimes cryptic stories of the fishes in their unreachable habitat. Professor, researcher, and author David A. McKee has taken Compton’s work, discovered in cardboard boxes following his death, and, along with others, provided chapters on bioluminescence, life in the deep, taxonomic arrangement, and life history information.
The perfect reference guide for students in grades 3 and up - or anyone! This handy, easy-to-use reference guide is divided into seven color-coded sections which includes Texas basic facts, geography, history, people, places, nature and miscellaneous information. Each section is color coded for easy recognition. This Pocket Guide comes with complete and comprehensive facts ALL about Texas. Riddles, recipes, and surprising facts make this guide a delight! Texas Basics section explores your state's symbols and their special meaning. Texas Geography section digs up the what's where in Texas. Texas History section is like traveling through time to some of Texas's greatest moments. Texas People section introduces you to famous personalities and your next-door neighbors. Texas Places section shows you where you might enjoy your next family vacation. Texas Nature section tells what Mother Nature gave to Texas. Texas Miscellaneous section describes the real fun stuff ALL about Texas.
"Consistently rated the best guides to the regions covered...Readable, tasteful, appealingly designed. Strong on dining, lodging, culture, and history."—National Geographic Traveler. Distinctive for their accuracy, simplicity, and conversational tone, the diverse travel guides in our Explorer's Great Destinations series meet the conflicting demands of the modern traveler. They're packed full of up-to-date information to help plan the perfect getaway. And they're compact and light enough to come along for the ride. A tool you'll turn to before, during, and after your trip, these guides include: Chapters on lodging, dining, transportation, history, shopping, recreation, and more! A section packed with practical information, such as lists of banks, hospitals, post offices, laundry mats, numbers for police, fire, and rescue, and other relevant information. Maps of regions and locales. From the sea border with Mexico to the Louisiana shore, the coast of Texas is rich in history, recreation, and natural and architectural beauty and is a major destination for both Texans and non-Texans alike.
A history of lighthouses that served as traffic signals and maps.
"What Moby-Dick is to whales, Brilliant Beacons is to lighthouses—a transformative account of a familiar yet mystical subject." —Laurence Bergreen, author of Columbus: The Four Voyages In this "magnificent compendium" (New Republic), best-selling author Eric Jay Dolin presents the definitive history of American lighthouses, and in so doing "illuminate[s] the history of America itself" (Entertainment Weekly). Treating readers to a memorable cast of characters and "fascinating anecdotes" (New York Review of Books), Dolin shows how the story of the nation, from a regional backwater colony to global industrial power, can be illustrated through its lighthouses—from New England to the Gulf of Mexico, the Great Lakes, the Pacific Coast, and all the way to Alaska and Hawaii. A Captain and Classic Boat Best Nautical Book of 2016
Beautiful photographs, maps, and descriptions of the fabled reef lights forming a 3,000-mile semicircle from Key West, Florida, to Corpus Christi, Texas.
This beautiful book combines Laurence Parent's magnificent photographs with Joe Nick Patoski's entertaining text to create a one-of-a-kind portrait of the Texas coast.
The diminutive size belies this book's widespread popularity. Lighthouses have a certain mystique and glory all their own. This little book sheds light on the extensive, impressive history of a coastal mainstay.
• What lighthouse is the farthest north in North Carolina? • Is the Bodie Island Lighthouse on an island? • What's a shoal and why is it dangerous for ships? • What pirate used to hide out on Ocracoke Island? • Which South Carolina lighthouse is called “The Leaning Lighthouse”? • What lighthouse was the last one built in South Carolina? • What North Carolina lighthouse is the tallest lighthouse in America? • Which lighthouse was moved 1600 feet inland? • Which lighthouse was designed like a puzzle—in pieces, so that it could be taken apart and put back together? • Where was the very first lighthouse in the world? • Where was the very first lighthouse in America? • What is a “Texas tower”? • How many lighthouses are on the Outer Banks? • How many steps do you have to climb to get to the top of the Cape Lookout Lighthouse? • How do range lights show boat captains how to enter a channel? Lighthouses of the Carolina for Kids answers these questions and many more. A lively text, rich in pictures, tells the history and lore of the lighthouses along the Carolina shores—from Currituck Lighthouse at the top of North Carolina to the Haig Point Lighthouses at the bottom of South Carolina. Learn about the people who designed and built them. Meet some of the keepers who braved storms and suffered loneliness while tending their beacons. Learn how lighthouses operated in the early days and how they operate now.
The author presents historical and contemporary photographs of the lighthouses of the Carolinas, stories of how they were built and of the people who lived and worked there, and information concerning visits to the surrounding areas.
A history of heroes and of lighthouses and how they work. Readers will discover how brave men and women have kept the lights shining bright from Maine to Texas to Alaska. Includes a guide to other lighthouse resources.
Readers investigate important events and people in their state's history as well as their own families' and learn that ordinary citizens pay a important part in any state's success.
Fascinating, factual trivia, oddities, curiosities and tales about the state of Texas. Includes reproducibles.
The Fyddeye Guide to America's Maritime History is a one-of-a-kind directory for tall ships, lighthouses, historic warships, maritime museums, and other attractions you can visit today that preserve, protect, and interpret our nation's maritime history. Use the Guide to plan a family trip, map out a heritage travel experience, research your local history, or find a heritage organization to help you discover the sea captain in your family tree. The Guide covers maritime history attractions in the Lower 48 states, Alaska, Hawaii, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands. More than 200 authentic tall ships, many offering travel excursions and educational experiences lasting from an hour to several weeks. More than 300 historic commercial vessels, such as ferries, tugs, and steamboats, as well as warships, including battleships, aircraft carriers, destroyers, and small craft dating from the 18th century to the middle 20th century that you can visit. More than 750 photogenic lighthouses and lightships grouped by East Coast, West Coast, the Gulf Coast, and the Great Lakes. More than 260 family-friendly maritime museums in 37 states and the District of Columbia. Three maps with suggested itineraries for discovering lighthouses in New England, California, and Michigan. Special articles on the tall ship Lady Washington, forgotten steamboats on the Okanogan River, the best lighthouse books, and major maritime festivals. Twenty-five professional photos of key ships and other attractions. The Fyddeye Guide to America's Maritime History complements Fyddeye, http: //www.fyddeye.com, the Internet's most comprehensive website dedicated to maritime history and heritage. Fyddeye also features an online community that discusses news about maritime history and current issues, including preservation of historic ships. You can also share photos and vote in polls on current events. Visit Fyddeye's pages on Facebook and follow Fyddeye on Twitter.

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