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Homicide has a history. In early modern England, that history saw two especially notable developments: one, the emergence in the sixteenth century of a formal distinction between murder and manslaughter, made meaningful through a lighter punishment than death for the latter, and two, a significant reduction in the rates of homicides individuals perpetrated on each other. Making Murder Public explores connections between these two changes. It demonstrates the value in distinguishing between murder and manslaughter, or at least in seeing how that distinction came to matter in a period which also witnessed dramatic drops in the occurrence of homicidal violence. Focused on the 'politics of murder', Making Murder Public examines how homicide became more effectively criminalized between 1480 and 1680, with chapters devoted to coroners' inquests, appeals and private compensation, duels and private vengeance, and print and public punishment. The English had begun moving away from treating homicide as an offence subject to private settlements or vengeance long before other Europeans, at least from the twelfth century. What happened in the early modern period was, in some ways, a continuation of processes long underway, but intensified and refocused by developments from 1480 to 1680. Making Murder Public argues that homicide became fully 'public' in these years, with killings seen to violate a 'king's peace' that people increasingly conflated with or subordinated to the 'public peace' or 'public justice.'
Making Murder Public
Language: en
Pages: 224
Authors: K. J. Kesselring
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2019-01-10 - Publisher: Oxford University Press

Homicide has a history. In early modern England, that history saw two especially notable developments: one, the emergence in the sixteenth century of a formal distinction between murder and manslaughter, made meaningful through a lighter punishment than death for the latter, and two, a significant reduction in the rates of
Making Murder Public
Language: en
Pages: 224
Authors: K. J. Kesselring
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2019-01-31 - Publisher: Oxford University Press

Homicide has a history. In early modern England, that history saw two especially notable developments: one, the emergence in the sixteenth century of a formal distinction between murder and manslaughter, made meaningful through a lighter punishment than death for the latter, and two, a significant reduction in the rates of
Debauched, Desperate, Deranged
Language: en
Pages: 240
Authors: Carolyn A. Conley
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2020-10-31 - Publisher: Oxford University Press

Contemporary studies have concluded that women are far less likely to kill than men and that when women do kill, they do so within the family. Debauched, Desperate, Deranged: Women Who Killed, London 1674-1913 examines the evolution of this pattern in the over 1400 trials in which women were prosecuted
Making Murder: The Fiction of Thomas Harris
Language: en
Pages: 358
Authors: Philip L. Simpson
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2009-12-30 - Publisher: ABC-CLIO

Thomas Harris created the iconic fictional murderer and sociopath, Hannibal Lecter. This book explores and analyzes the characters, artistry, and cultural impact of Harris's novels—four of which are centered on the terrifying villain of the iconic film, The Silence of the Lambs. • Includes reproductions of paintings that figure heavily
England's Northern Frontier
Language: en
Pages:
Authors: Jackson Armstrong
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2020-11-12 - Publisher: Cambridge University Press

The three counties of England's northern borderlands have long had a reputation as an exceptional and peripheral region within the medieval kingdom, preoccupied with local turbulence as a result of the proximity of a hostile frontier with Scotland. Yet, in the fifteenth century, open war was an infrequent occurrence in