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Math Jokes 4 Mathy Folks is an absolute gem...---Jim Rubillo Professor Emeritus, Bucks County Community College, Newtown, PA The jokes in this book are well-chosen and cover a wide spectrum, from jokes for kids to jokes for math majors, from corny to thought-provoking---Art Benjamin Professor and Mathemagician, Harvey Mudd College, Claremont, CA This is a book that every math teacher from elementary school through college should have in their classroom library. Who said math can't be funny?---Victoria Miles, Middle Grades Math Teacher, Weymouth, MA Patrick Vennebush has put together the most comprehensive set of mathematical jokes I have ever seen...if you like math and you like jokes---or if you need a joke to liven up an otherwise dull and boring lecture---then you need to buy this book.---Guy Brandenburg, Retired Teacher, Washington, DC Math nerds and punsters rejoice! This is the book you've been waiting for---your perfect source for that one-liner to impress your girlfriend, boyfriend, or 8th-grade math teacher. ---Cathy Seeley, Past President, NCTM; Author of Faster isn't Smarter---Messages About Math, Teaching and Learning in the 21st Century I haven't laughed so hard since I discovered that imaginary numbers are just numbers with a not-so-real complex. Enjoy!---Edward B. Burger Professor, Williams College Williamstown, MA When not solving problems, telling jokes, or playing ultimate, G. Patrick Vennebush manages online projects for the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. He has an M.A. in curriculum and instruction from the University of Maryland. He lives in northern Virginia with his wife Nadine, who faughs at 80% of his jokes; his twin toddlers Alex and Eli, who only appreciate 20% of his humor; and his golden retriever Remy, who has never been very good with percents
Who says math can't be funny? In 'More Jokes 4 Mathy Folks' as in 'Math Jokes 4 Mathy Folks', Patrick Vennebush dispels the myth of the humorless mathematician. His quick wit comes through in this incredible compilation of jokes and stories. Intended for all math types, both 'More Jokes 4 Mathy Folks' and 'Math Jokes 4 Mathy Folks' provide a comprehensive collection of math humor, each book containing over 400 jokes. This too is a book that all teachers from elementary school through college should have in their library. But the humor isn't just for the classroom -- it also appeals to engineers, statisticians, and other math professionals searching for some good, clean, numerical fun. From basic facts (Why is 6 afraid of 7?) to trigonometry (Mathematical puns are the first sine of dementia) and algebra (Graphing rational functions is a pain in the asymptote), no topic is safe. As Professor Jim Rubillo notes, Math Jokes 4 Math Folks is an absolute gem for anyone dedicated to seeing mathematical ideas through puns, double meanings, and blatant 'bad' jokes. Such perspectives help to see concepts and ideas in different and creative ways.
The original title for this work was “Mathematical Literacy, What Is It and Why You Need it”. The current title reflects that there can be no real learning in any subject, unless questions of who, what, when, where, why and how are raised in the minds of the learners. The book is not a mathematical text, and there are no assigned exercises or exams. It is written for reasonably intelligent and curious individuals, both those who value mathematics, aware of its many important applications and others who have been inappropriately exposed to mathematics, leading to indifference to the subject, fear and even loathing. These feelings are all consequences of meaningless presentations, drill, rote learning and being lost as the purpose of what is being studied. Mathematics education needs a radical reform. There is more than one way to accomplish this. Here the author presents his approach of wrapping mathematical ideas in a story. To learn one first must develop an interest in a problem and the curiosity to find how masters of mathematics have solved them. What is necessary to be mathematically literate? It’s not about solving algebraic equations or even making a geometric proof. These are valuable skills but not evidence of literacy. We often seek answers but learning to ask pertinent questions is the road to mathematical literacy. Here is the good news: new mathematical ideas have a way of finding applications. This is known as “the unreasonable effectiveness of mathematics.”
Math Your Kids WANT to Do. You’ll love these math games because they give your child a strong foundation for mathematical success. By playing these games, you strengthen your child’s intuitive understanding of numbers and build problem-solving strategies. Mastering a math game can be hard work. But kids do it willingly because it’s fun. Math You Can Play Combo features two books in one, with 42 kid-tested games that offer a variety of challenges for preschool and school-age learners. Chapters include: • Early Counting: Practice subitizing — recognizing small numbers of items at a glance—and learn the number symbols. • Childhood Classics: Traditional folk games invite the whole family to enjoy playing with math. • Number Bonds: Build a mental picture of the relationships between numbers as you begin to explore addition. • Numbers to One Hundred: Develop mental math skills for working with larger numbers. Practice using place value, addition, and subtraction. • Mixed Operations: Give mental muscles a workout with games that require number skills and logical thinking. • Logic and Probability: Logic games sharpen inductive and deductive thinking skills, while games of chance build an intuition for probability. Math games prevent math anxiety. Games pump up your child’s mental muscle, reduce the fear of failure, and generate a positive attitude toward mathematics. Parents can use these games to enjoy quality time with your children. Classroom teachers like them as warm-ups and learning center activities or for a relaxing review day at the end of a term. If you are a tutor or homeschooler, make games a regular feature in your lesson plans to build your students’ math skills. So what are you waiting for? Clear off a table, grab a deck of cards, and let's play some math!
This long-awaited sequel of Mathematical Quickies & Trickles comes with many creative worked examples and questions, with cartoons sprinkled throughout the book to keep in line with the same irreverent and fun spirit of the previous book. In addition to 300+ trick and tricky questions, More Mathematical Quickies & Trickles comes with more than 25 five-minute enrichment mathematics items, aimed at enhancing the mathematical problem-solving skills of problem solvers. You won’t only be exposed to different problem-solving techniques, commonly used in answering math contests and competitions questions, but also learn to appreciate elegant or intuitive solutions. More Mathematical Quickies & Trickies would appeal primarily to these audiences: * grades 6-8 students and teachers looking for some fertile trick and tricky questions; * mathletes preparing for local and regional contests and competitions; * problem solvers longing to be challenged by questions whose obvious solutions are never the correct ones for what offhand appears to be true is false. Contents 1. Creative GST 2. Are You Calculator-Smart? 3. What Is the Easy Way? 4. The Magic of Three Consecutive Numbers 5. Twitter Math @MathPlus 6. What Is 27 x 37, Really? 7. Humanizing 1, 2, 3 8. A Mathophobia Kit 9. WITs: 13 Ways to Attain Mathematical Excellence 10. Facebook Math: Numeracy vs. Literacy 11. Thou Shalt Not Divide By Zero 12. Math Jokes to Relieve Stress 13. Look-see Proofs 14. Some PhD Math Questions 15. Mathematical Prayers 16. The Largest Product 17. What’s Wrong?: A Comedy of Mathematical Errors 18. The Aha! Myth 19. Sam Loyd’s Toughies 20. The Tuesday Boy Problem 21. What Is 1 + 1, Really? 22. In Love with Cryptarithms 23. Mathematical Kiasuism 24. The Mathemagic of 142857 25. The Lighter Side of Singapore Math 26. K C Yan’s Laws & Lores 27 Flee and Free from the FREE Answers/Hints/Solutions Bibliography & References
Prevent math anxiety — by playing games! You’ll love these math games because they give your child a sturdy foundation for understanding addition and subtraction. Help your child learn mental flexibility by playing with numbers, from basic math facts to the hundreds and thousands. Logic games build strategic thinking skills, and dice games give students hands-on experience with probability. Addition & Subtraction features 23 kid-tested games, offering a variety of challenges for elementary-age students. Chapters include: • Tens and Teens: Master the concept of number bonds — the relationship between a whole number and the parts that combine to make it — and build a logical foundation for future math. • Numbers to One Hundred: Develop mental math skills for working with larger numbers. Practice using place value, addition, and subtraction. • Mixed Operations: Give mental muscles a workout with games that require number skills and logical thinking. • Logic and Probability: Logic games sharpen inductive and deductive thinking skills, while games of chance build an intuition for probability. Math games protect your child from math phobia. Games pump up your child’s mental muscle, reduce the fear of failure, and generate a positive attitude toward mathematics. Parents can use these games to enjoy quality time with your children. Classroom teachers like them as warm-ups and learning center activities or for a relaxing review day at the end of a term. If you are a tutor or homeschooler, make games a regular feature in your lesson plans to build your students’ math skills. So what are you waiting for? Clear off a table, grab a deck of cards, and let's play some math!
This book gives teachers ways to provoke thought and start discussion - something schemes of work don't always allow time for. With a curriculum that is getting increasingly content-heavy, it's important for teachers to look to develop thinking skills where they can. 365 Things to make you go hmm ... provides one opportunity a day (through questions / tasks) to develop skills like creative thinking, a sense of wonder, logic and decision-making. By getting pupils talking, classroom communities are built. Skills include: creative thinking, mathematical thinking, problem-solving, critical thinking, personal / inter-personal skills, a sense of wonder/curiosity about the world. For use by teachers from KS1 through to secondary teachers.

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