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Traces the history of mathematics and numeration, and reviews symbolic logic, set theory, series, equations, functions, geometry, trigonometry, vector analysis, fractals, matrices, calculus, probability theory, and differential equations
Traces the history of mathematics and numeration, and reviews symbolic logic, set theory, series, equations, functions, geometry, trigonometry, vector analysis, fractals, matrices, calculus, probability theory, and differential equations
Profiles ten individuals who have made significant contributions to the field of mathematics, from ancient times to 1300.
Mathematics opens new doors to the amazing world of maths. Telling the exciting story from a historical perspective, it shows how mathematical science advanced through the discoveries of the ancient Babylonians, Egyptians and Greeks, the great scholars of medieval Islam and Europe, and the Renaissance and the birth of the Scientific Revolution. From the simplest concepts of numbers and arithmetic, geometry and algebra, trigonometry and calculus, right through to infinity and chaos theory, Mathematics introduces and explains the most important concepts in accessible, non-technical language.
With many entertaining examples of mathematical curiosities, educators Posamentier and Lehmann have created the perfect introduction to the wonders of mathematics for the general reader, requiring only a high school background in the subject.
This book conveys the ancient wisdom of the magic of numbers in an easy-to-understand format aimed at both the reader experienced in numerology and the uninitiated. This book covers how modern numerology grew and developed over the years, including how the term “numerology” came into use in the Western world. It uncovers how wisdom is based on numbers and explores whether mere mortals invented numbers as we know them today. Included also is the mystical aspect of the number zero and the presence of God everywhere, including in numbers that are used every day. At a practical level, the author shares the proper method of computing the final number from the date of birth and untangles the confusion of the mathematics involved in major number computation. Core numbers are also discussed to help readers work these out in their own lives and in the lives of their friends, families, and colleagues. Through his many years of experience, the author has had the privilege of studying many live cases. One of the most interesting among these is the numerology behind a pair of identical twins, which he reveals exclusively in this book.
In this fascinating discussion of ancient mathematics, author Peter Rudman does not just chronicle the archaeological record of what mathematics was done; he digs deeper into the more important question of why it was done in a particular way. Why did the Egyptians use a bizarre method of expressing fractions? Why did the Babylonians use an awkward number system based on multiples of 60? Rudman answers such intriguing questions, arguing that some mathematical thinking is universal and timeless. The similarity of the Babylonian and Mayan number systems, two cultures widely separated in time and space, illustrates the argument. He then traces the evolution of number systems from finger counting in hunter-gatherer cultures to pebble counting in herder-farmer cultures of the Nile and Tigris-Euphrates valleys, which defined the number systems that continued to be used even after the invention of writing. With separate chapters devoted to the remarkable Egyptian and Babylonian mathematics of the era from about 3500 to 2000 BCE, when all of the basic arithmetic operations and even quadratic algebra became doable, Rudman concludes his interpretation of the archaeological record. Since some of the mathematics formerly credited to the Greeks is now known to be a prior Babylonian invention, Rudman adds a chapter that discusses the math used by Pythagoras, Eratosthenes, and Hippasus, which has Babylonian roots, illustrating the watershed difference in abstraction and rigor that the Greeks introduced. He also suggests that we might improve present-day teaching by taking note of how the Greeks taught math. Complete with sidebars offering recreational math brainteasers, this engrossing discussion of the evolution of mathematics will appeal to both scholars and lay readers with an interest in mathematics and its history.

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