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‘Arriving in Cambridge on my first day as an undergraduate, I could see nothing except a cold white October mist. At the age of twenty-four I was a complete failure, with nothing to show for my life except a few poems nobody wanted to publish in book form.’ Falling Towards England – the second volume of Clive James’s Unreliable Memoirs – was meant to be the last. Thankfully, that's not the case. In ‘Unreliable Memoirs III’, May Week Was in June, Clive details his time at Cambridge, including film reviewing, writing poetry, falling in love (often), and marrying (once) during May Week – which was not only in June but also two weeks long . . .
The University of Cambridge has been a federation of colleges for centuries; in the past hundred years it has also become a center of international fame in many disciplines, with numerous faculties and departments. Volume IV of A History of the University of Cambridge covers the years 1870-1990, and explores the fascinating labyrinth of the federation and the nature of this extraordinary academic growth; it also sketches the society of the University and its place in the world; the role of religion and learning; the entry of women; and the leading characters in the story--Henry Sidgwick, F. W. Maitland, Gowland Hopkins, Ernest Rutherford, and many others.
Always Unreliable is the collected first three volumes of Clive James's eloquently witty autobiographies, Unreliable Memoirs, Falling Towards England and May Week Was in June. In Unreliable Memoirs we meet the young Clive James – dressed in shorts and growing up in post-war Sydney. With Falling Towards England, we find Clive living in a Swiss Cottage B&B, where he practises the Twist, anticipates poetical masterpieces he’s yet to compose, and worries about his wardrobe. Finally, May Week Was In June sees Clive at Cambridge University, where he enthusiastically involves himself in college life (generally female lives) until May Week – not only in June but also a fortnight long – when he gets married. The rest, of course, is history . . .

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