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The past decade has seen a major structural shift in broadcasting in Southeast Asia, with the development of digital satellite and cable broadcasting. This shift has impacted upon some of the most information-sensitive governments in the world: Singapore, Malaysia and, until recently, Indonesia. Atkins traces this development in five countries, showing that the challenge to authoritarian regimes, anticipated by modern theorists as a result of the globalization of news and information, is not materializing. Instead, a new commercial elite has arisen, Southeast Asia's own mini-moguls, who act as gatekeepers for state interests, as partners to global media companies.
There are many different kinds of sub-national conflicts across Asia, with a variety of causes, but since September 11, 2001 these have been increasingly portrayed as part of the global terrorist threat, to be dealt with by the War on Terror. This major new study examines a wide range of such conflicts, showing how, despite their significant differences, they share the role of the media as interlocutor, and exploring how the media exercises this role. The book raises a number of issues concerning how the media report different forms of political violence and conflict, including issues of impartiality in the media's relations with governments and insurgents, and how the focus on the 'War on Terror' has led to some forms of violence - notably those employed by states for political purposes - to be overlooked. As the issue of international terrorism remains one of the most pressing issues of the modern day, this is a significant and important book which will interest the general reader and scholars from all disciplines.
. . . the book is in a comprehensive, readable format. . . the book is logically organised, rich in data and statistics regarding the issues that it covers, as well as accessibly written such that its points would not be lost on the average upper-level undergraduate student with some preparation in Asian studies and the social sciences. Jane M. Ferguson, South East Asia Research . . . a serious academic work that should be on the official reading list of every media studies course. Chris Roberts, Presenter, Sky News Jonathan Woodier has written an excellent book on the politics of media control in Southeast Asia. He shows how political elites in the region are using major events such as the 1997 Asian Financial Crisis and the 2001 September 11 terror attacks as well as innovations in media tools such as public relations and the internet to control information flow to their citizens. This book is a must read for anyone interested in an explanation why Southeast Asian models of authoritarian models are surviving. A brilliant analysis, it combines media theory with a critical discussion of contemporary developments in Asia. James Gomez, Keio University, Japan True to the old Chinese adage kill a chicken scare a monkey , the few who once challenged Southeast Asia s ruling elites disappeared and the majority were silent. Crude, but effective. Modern times, however, demand a more sophisticated approach. Ruling elites now strip cultures naked and micro manage people s minds. Their preferred tools of penetration and manipulation are a compliant media and a money hungry PR industry. Jonathan Woodier s insights will ensure that you will never read a newspaper or watch TV news in quite the same way again. Trevor Watson, Professional Public Relations Pty Ltd, Australia This is an engaging and informative analysis of the media landscape in South East Asia. It uncovers the pervasive impact of the global media on the political process, and raises important academic and policy issues in the process. This book is timely, and will be a must read for policymakers, academics and students across communications, media studies, politics and democratization, as well as for everyone with an interest in current day developments in South East Asia. Joep Cornelissen, Leeds University Business School, UK Jonathan Woodier s latest work considers what impact the media has upon the democratization process in Southeast Asia. Has the media had a liberalizing effect or become subject to elite control in Southeast Asia and, if so, why? What role does the global media play in this process, particularly given its conglomerization and commoditization? By examining the communications media and its relationship to political change in Southeast Asia, this fascinating study will endeavour to provide both a regional comparative analysis and a more balanced interpretation of the mass communication media in the wake of September 11, 2001. The book also investigates the durability of authoritarian regimes and the enduring capacity of the media-controlled state alongside the growing sophistication of political communications particularly the use of PR consultants. The author provides an insider s view with unique insights into the practice of political communication and its development throughout the strategically important region of Southeast Asia with its large Moslem states as well as much further afield to countries such as China and post-industrial Europe. As such the book will be warmly welcomed by academics of politics, international relations, media, communications and PR. It will also appeal to researchers interested in political change, the rise of the global media giants and the influence of authoritarian states such as China.
Media education in Asia is a relatively young, but rapidly developing part of the curriculum. Research has been conducted and papers have been written on various issues concerning media education in Asia. The dominant models of media education in the world are broadly Western and most are drawn from English-speaking countries. The question is whether a similar pattern exists in Asia, where there may be differences in culture, heritage, beliefs, values, education policy, as well as curriculum and pedagogy. Are educators in Asia following the Western model in developing and implementing media education, or are they devising their own models? With this question in mind, this book sets out to understand the prevailing perspectives regarding media education in various Asian societies. While most debates about media education are carried out in Western contexts, this book hopes to provide a platform for readers to examine this issue in an Asian context.
Brings together leading and emerging scholars from Asia, North America and Australia to develop new perspectives on the key issues in contemporary Asian cultural and media studies.
New and updated statistics on population, the family, health, education and communication, work, and politics and human rights in relation to women.

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