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This comprehensive study of families in the Mediterranean world spans the Bronze Age through Late Antiquity, and looks at families and households in various ancient societies inhabiting the regions around the Mediterranean Sea in an attempt to break down artificial boundaries between academic disciplines.
The first book to explore the religious dimensions of the familyand the household in ancient Mediterranean and West Asianantiquity. Advances our understanding of household and familial religion,as opposed to state-sponsored or civic temple cults Reconstructs domestic and family religious practices in Egypt,Greece, Rome, Israel, Mesopotamia, Ugarit, Emar, and Philistia Explores many household rituals, such as providing forancestral spirits, and petitioning of a household's patron deitiesor of spirits associated with the house itself Examines lifecycle rituals – from pregnancy and birth tomaturity, old age, death, and beyond Looks at religious practices relating to the household bothwithin the home itself and other spaces, such as at extramuraltombs and local sanctuaries
This study captures the dynamics of the everyday family life of the common people in Roman Egypt, a social strata that constituted the vast majority of any pre-modern society but rarely figures in ancient sources or in modern scholarship. The documentary papyri and, above all, the private letters and the census returns provide us with a wealth of information on these people not available for any other region of the ancient Mediterranean. The book discusses such things as family composition and household size and the differences between urban and rural families, exploring what can be ascribed to cultural patterns, economic considerations and/or individual preferences by setting the family in Roman Egypt into context with other pre-modern societies where families adopted such strategies to deal with similar exigencies of their daily lives.
How does a culture become Christian, especially one that is heir to such ancient traditions and spectacular monuments as Egypt? This book offers a new model for envisioning the process of Christianization by looking at the construction of Christianity in the various social and creative worlds active in Egyptian culture during late antiquity. As David Frankfurter shows, members of these different social and creative worlds came to create different forms of Christianity according to their specific interests, their traditional idioms, and their sense of what the religion could offer. Reintroducing the term “syncretism” for the inevitable and continuous process by which a religion is acculturated, the book addresses the various formations of Egyptian Christianity that developed in the domestic sphere, the worlds of holy men and saints’ shrines, the work of craftsmen and artisans, the culture of monastic scribes, and the reimagination of the landscape itself, through processions, architecture, and the potent remains of the past. Drawing on sermons and magical texts, saints’ lives and figurines, letters and amulets, and comparisons with Christianization elsewhere in the Roman empire and beyond, Christianizing Egypt reconceives religious change—from the “conversion” of hearts and minds to the selective incorporation and application of strategies for protection, authority, and efficacy, and for imagining the environment.
Covering the Hellenistic and Imperial periods in both pagan polytheistic as well as Jewish monotheistic settings, this edited collection focuses on individuation in everyday religious practices across the ancient Mediterranean as identified in institutional developments and philosophical reflections on the self.
New approaches to the study of the family in antiquity.
This volume contains 20 papers that explore ancient notions and experiences of childhood around the Mediterranean, from prehistory to late antiquity.
This book investigates the effects of fatherlessness on the societies, cultures, politics and families of the ancient Mediterranean world.
A new and thought-provoking study of marriage and the law in late antiquity, looking particularly at the new legislation enacted by the emperor Constantine (reigned AD 307-337). Famously the first Christian emperor did his laws reflect Christian ideals, or pagan practice?
"Most societies in the past have had slaves, and almost all peoples have at some time in their pasts been both slaves as well as owners of slaves. Recent decades have seen a significant increase in our understanding of the historical role played by slavery and wide interest across a range of academic disciplines in the evolution of the institution. Exciting and innovative research methodologies have been developed, and numerous fruitful debates generated. Further, the study of slavery has come to providestrong connections between academic research and the wider public interest at a time when such links have in general been weak. The CambridgeWorld History of Slavery responds to these trends by providing for the first time, in four volumes, a comprehensive global history of this widespread phenomenon from the ancient world to the present day. Volume I surveys the history of slavery in the ancient Mediterranean world. Although chapters are devoted to the ancient Near East and the Jews, its principal concern is with the societies of ancient Greece and Rome. These are often considered as the first examples in world history of genuine slave societies because of the widespread prevalence of chattel slavery, which is argued to have been a cultural manifestation of the ubiquitous violence in societies typified by incessant warfare"--Provided by publisher.
Economic Theory and the Ancient Mediterranean presents a comprehensive introduction to the application of contemporary economic theory to the ancient societies of the Mediterranean Sea from the period of 5000 BCE to 400 CE. Offers an accessible presentation of modern economic theory and its relationships to ancient societies Presents innovative expositions and applications of economic theory to issues in antiquity not often found in the literature Features insightful discussions of the relevance of contemporary economic models to various situations in antiquity Written for a broad range of scholars of ancient Mediterranean regions, including archaeologists, ancient historians, and philologists
The Oxford Handbook of Childhood and Education in the Classical World is a comprehensive and forward-thinking study of an expanding subfield in classical studies
Explores the socio-economic background of people in the New Testament using papyrological evidence from Roman Egypt.
This Companion provides a comprehensive introduction to keytopics in the study of ancient history. Examines the forms of evidence, problems, approaches, and majorthemes in the study of ancient history Comprises more than 40 essays, written by leading internationalscholars Moves beyond the primary focus on Greece and Rome with coverageof the various cultures within the ancient Mediterranean Draws on the latest research in the field Provides an essential resource for any student of ancienthistory
This volume looks at how the issues of textiles and gender intertwine across three millennia in antiquity and examines continuities and differences across time and space – with surprising resonances for the modern world. The interplay of gender, identity, textile production and use is notable on many levels, from the question of who was involved in the transformation of raw materials into fabric at one end, to the wearing of garments and the construction of identity at the other. Textile production has often been considered to follow a linear trajectory from a domestic (female) activity to a more 'commercial' or 'industrial' (male-centred) mode of production. In reality, many modes of production co-existed and the making of textiles is not so easily grafted onto the labour of one sex or the other. Similarly, textiles once transformed into garments are often of 'unisex' shape but worn to express the gender of the wearer. As shown by the detailed textual source material and the rich illustrations in this volume, dress and gender are intimately linked in the visual and written records of antiquity. The contributors show how it is common practice in both art and literature not only to use particular garments to characterize one sex or the other, but also to undermine characterizations by suggesting that they display features usually associated with the opposite gender.
This book adopts a multidisciplinary approach to explore the social and cultural constructions of motherhood and childhood throughout prehistoric and classic societies in Antiquity.
An accessible and authoritative overview capturing the vitality anddiversity of scholarship that exists on the transformative timeperiod known as late antiquity. Provides an essential overview of current scholarship on lateantiquity – from between the accession of Diocletian in AD284 and the end of Roman rule in the Mediterranean Comprises 39 essays from some of the world's foremost scholarsof the era Presents this once-neglected period as an age of powerfultransformation that shaped the modern world Emphasizes the central importance of religion and itsconnection with economic, social, and political life Winner of the 2009 Single Volume Reference/Humanities &Social Sciences PROSE award granted by the Association of AmericanPublishers

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