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Dr Wayne W. Dyer and co-author Dee Garnes had often talked about how the ones who know the most about God are those who have just recently been wrapped in the arms of the Divine: our infants and toddlers. In fact, Dee had an interaction with her own young son that convinced her of his acquaintance with our Source of being. Curious about this phenomenon, Wayne and Dee decided to issue an invitation to parents all over the globe to share their experiences. The overwhelming response they received prompted them to put together this book, which includes the most interesting and illuminating of these stories in which boys and girls speak about their remembrances from the time before they were born. Children share their dialogues with God, talk about long-deceased family members they knew while in the dimension of Spirit, verify past-life recollections, give evidence that they themselves had a hand in picking their own parents and the timing of their sojourn to Earth, and speak eloquently and accurately of a kind of Divine love that exists beyond this physical realm.This fascinating book encourages all of us, not just parents, to take a much more active role in communicating with our planet's new arrivals... and to realize that there is far more to this earthly experience than what we perceive with our five senses.
The ones who know the most about God are those who have just recently been wrapped in the arms of the Divine: our infants and toddlers. Believing that we gradually lose our intimate knowledge of heaven as we grow up, Dyer and Garnes issued an invitation to parents all over the world to share their experiences. This book includes the most interesting and illuminating stories in which very young children speak about their remembrances before they were born.
Now revised and updated, The Memory Catcher was first published in 2012. For more than three decades, Sarah Hinze's groundbreaking research on prebirth experiences has provided solid evidence that children not yet born can warn, protect and enlighten us from another plane of existence. She has compiled hundreds of accounts that tell of heavenly encounters between parents and their soon-to-be-born children.As a young girl in Tennessee, Sarah learned to sense when angels were near. She eventually fell in love with Brent, who shared her belief in heaven. A year after their wedding, she held their first baby and realized that some of the angels she had felt nearby had been her own unborn children announcing it was their time to be born.After a series of personal challenges, including losing a baby to miscarriage, Sarah began to feel prompted that God wanted her to write about unborn children. Was it possible that other mothers had received similar experiences?Sarah decided to send requests for stories of unborn children to many publications across the USA. Within a few weeks, a mother contacted her and said, "I saw my unborn daughter and I want to tell you about it." Soon word spread and Sarah was collecting memories from around the world and publishing books about them.Now, with the help of her daughter Laura and her husband Brent, Sarah shares key experiences that shaped her belief in God, her willingness to follow His direction for her life, and set her on course to become the Memory Catcher, one of the world's greatest advocates for children waiting to be born.
It's simply writing down thoughts and anything else that would help one get through the loss of their father.- diary, put a photo of memory on notebook, + Quotes of Grief
This memory journal makes a perfect sympathy gift or for yourself to help with the grief. Contents of the journal include: If Roses Grow In Heaven poem, pages to write about your loved one's favorite things, dislikes, accomplishments. and lined pages to record your memories and special moments.
I have witnessed the so called world of self-realization hundreds of thousands times, or even a million times. I will continue to discard my memories, and erase the karma of my memories and habits that I have accumulated during my life. By discarding all my memories from my life, I hope to be born again into a world where I am disconnected from life or the world, where only the true self exists without holding any of the self in a human’s mind, the heaven. I was introduced to Maum Meditation by my elder brother in November 2003. I discard all my emotions, joy, happiness, sorrow and anger into the black hole. In my mind, all the karma that I have gathered during my life is discarded into the black hole. In my mind, I sit on the summit of Moak Mountain, and also on the summit of my hometown mountain, dispatching all my memories into the black hole. I discard all my momentary memories into the black hole. Until I remember nothing, I discard all my memories into the black hole from the clusters of galaxies, Venus, and Uranus. I even discard the earth, sun and moon into the black hole as soon as they come to my mind. And I even blast away the black hole as soon as it comes up. Until nothing occurs and bugs my mind all the memories are discarded into the original universe of the creator of this before all things.
Is it possible to remember how the universe was created, where humans came from, and what we planned to do with our lives? Yes, says board-certified psychiatrist Shakuntala Modi, M.D. For more than a decade Dr. Modi has used clinical hypnosis to help patients deiscover the sources of their physical and mental health problems, not only in their pasts, but even in their past lives. Now she targets the cosmos. According to Dr. Modi, everyone carries memories of God and creation in their subconscious. This book presents information from many of her hypnotized patients, presenting evidence that we all carry the secrets of the universe within us. The astonishing revelations in this book include real patient descriptions of:What it's like to be one with GodWhy there are individual soulsWhere evil came fromHow angels were createdHow dying feelsHow easy it is to return to Heaven after death Prepare to have your world view completely altered by the information in Memories of God and Creation.
"More than Precious Memories is the first book of its kind - a collection of essays offering scholarly analysis and interpretation of Southern Gospel Music. Believing Southern Gospel Music to be a significant cultural and religious phenomenon worthy of the best efforts of scholarship, Graves and Fillingim have assembled a diverse group of scholars who apply a variety of methods and theories to the task of understanding Southern Gospel Music and its cultural context."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved
Watch a video From the author of the multimillion-selling bestselling, 90 Minutes in Heaven, spiritual instructions for living and preparing for eternal life. Since publishing his inspirational bestseller in 2004, Don Piper has traveled the world spreading his message of faith—certain faith—in the promise of Heaven. In Heaven is Real, Piper shared how life's trials can be turned into spiritual lessons, when we are open to the certainty of God's grace and love. Now, in his first new book in four years, Piper draws on his own firsthand experiences with the joys of Heaven—as well as the lessons found in the Gospel—to offer a set of "departing instructions," helping readers face the inevitable battles ahead, prepare for eternal life, and, starting today, live a happy, fulfilling, purposeful life on Earth while preparing for the glories of Heaven.
Although Lucy's wedding to Kevin was perfect, soon afterwards, the chaos of the Camdens begins anew.
The first book by a respected journalist on Nearing Death Awareness—similar to Near-Death Experience—this “fascinating” (Kirkus Reviews) exploration brings “humor, sympathy, and keen critical intelligence to a topic that is all too often off-limits” (Ptolemy Tompkins, collaborator with Eben Alexander on Proof of Heaven). People everywhere carry with them extraordinary, deeply comforting experiences that arrived at the moment when they most needed relief: when they lost a loved one. These experiences can include clear messages from beyond, profound and vividly beautiful visions, mysterious connections and spiritual awareness, foreknowledge of a loved one’s passing—all of which evade explanation by science and logic. Most people keep these transcendent experiences secret for fear they will be discounted by hyperrational scrutiny. Yet these very common occurrences have the power to console, comfort, and even transform our understanding of life and death. Prompted by her family’s surprising, profound experiences around the death of her father and her sister, reporter Patricia Pearson sets out on an open-minded inquiry, a rare journalistic investigation of Nearing Death Awareness, which Anne Rice praises as “substantive, eloquent, and worthwhile.” Opening Heaven’s Door offers deeply affecting stories of messages from the dying and the dead in a fascinating work of investigative journalism, pointing to new scientific explanations that give these luminous moments the importance felt by those who experience them. Pearson also delves into out-of-body and near-death experiences, examining stories and research to make sense of these related but distinct categories. Challenging current assumptions about what we know and what we are still unable to explain, Opening Heaven’s Door will forever alter your perceptions of the nature of life and death.
The Christian doctrine of heaven has been a moral source of enormous power in western culture. It has provided a striking account of the ultimate good in life and has for two millennia animated the hope that our lives can be fully meaningful. Recently, however, the doctrine of heaven has lost much of its grip on the western imagination and has become a vague and largely ignored part of the Christian creed. Not only have our hopes been redefined as a result, but our very identity as human beings has been altered. In this book, Jerry L. Walls argues that the doctrine of heaven is ripe for serious reconsideration. He contends not only that the orthodox view of heaven can be defended from objections commonly raised against it, but also that heaven is a powerful resource for addressing persistent philosophical problems, not the least of which concern the ground of morality and the meaning of life. Walls shows how heaven is integrally related to central Christian doctrines, particularly those concerning salvation, and tackles the difficult problem of why faith in Christ is necessary to save us from our sins. In addition, heaven is shown to illumine thorny problems of personal identity and to be an essential component of a satisfactory theodicy. Walls goes on to examine data from near-death experiences from the standpoint of some important recent work in epistemology and argues that they offer positive evidence for heaven. He concludes that we profoundly need to recover the hope of heaven in order to recover our very humanity.
A biography of the priest, historian and supporter of social reform, now remembered as the author of The Water Babies.
Does heaven exist? If so, what is it like? And how does one get in? Throughout history, painters, poets, philosophers, pastors, and many ordinary people have pondered these questions. Perhaps no other topic captures the popular imagination quite like heaven. Gary Scott Smith examines how Americans from the Puritans to the present have imagined heaven. He argues that whether Americans have perceived heaven as reality or fantasy, as God's home or a human invention, as a source of inspiration and comfort or an opiate that distracts from earthly life, or as a place of worship or a perpetual playground has varied largely according to the spirit of the age. In the colonial era, conceptions of heaven focused primarily on the glory of God. For the Victorians, heaven was a warm, comfortable home where people would live forever with their family and friends. Today, heaven is often less distinctively Christian and more of a celestial entertainment center or a paradise where everyone can reach his full potential. Drawing on an astounding array of sources, including works of art, music, sociology, psychology, folklore, liturgy, sermons, poetry, fiction, jokes, and devotional books, Smith paints a sweeping, provocative portrait of what Americans-from Jonathan Edwards to Mitch Albom-have thought about heaven.
Apocalyptic AI, the hope that we might one day upload our minds into machines or cyberspace and live forever, is a surprisingly wide-spread and influential idea, affecting everything from the world view of online gamers to government research funding and philosophical thought. In Apocalyptic AI, Robert Geraci offers the first serious account of this "cyber-theology" and the people who promote it. Drawing on interviews with roboticists and AI researchers and with devotees of the online game Second Life, among others, Geraci illuminates the ideas of such advocates of Apocalyptic AI as Hans Moravec and Ray Kurzweil. He reveals that the rhetoric of Apocalyptic AI is strikingly similar to that of the apocalyptic traditions of Judaism and Christianity. In both systems, the believer is trapped in a dualistic universe and expects a resolution in which he or she will be translated to a transcendent new world and live forever in a glorified new body. Equally important, Geraci shows how this worldview shapes our culture. Apocalyptic AI has become a powerful force in modern culture. In this superb volume, he shines a light on this belief system, revealing what it is and how it is changing society.

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