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Mexican American Baseball in the Inland Empire celebrates the thriving culture of former teams from Pomona, Ontario, Cucamonga, Chino, Claremont, San Bernardino, Colton, Riverside, Corona, Beaumont, and the Coachella Valley. From the early 20th century through the 1950s, baseball diamonds in the Inland Empire provided unique opportunities for nurturing athletic and educational skills, ethnic identity, and political self-determination for Mexican Americans during an era of segregation. Legendary men's and women's teams--such as the Corona Athletics, San Bernardino's Mitla Café, the Colton Mercuries, and Las Debs de Corona--served as an important means for Mexican American communities to examine civil and educational rights and offer valuable insight on social, cultural, and gender roles. These evocative photographs recall the often-neglected history of Mexican American barrio baseball clubs of the Inland Empire.
The Inland Empire 66ers of San Bernardino is a minor league baseball team in San Bernardino, California. They are the Low-A affiliate of the Los Angeles Angels and play in the Low-A West. The 66ers play home games at San Manuel Stadium. They were members of the California League from 1987 to 2020. Mexican American Baseball in the Inland Empire celebrates the thriving culture of former teams from Pomona, Ontario, Cucamonga, Chino, Claremont, San Bernardino, Colton, Riverside, Corona, Beaumont, and the Coachella Valley. From the early 20th century through the 1950s, baseball diamonds in the Inland Empire provided unique opportunities for nurturing athletic and educational skills, ethnic identity, and political self-determination for Mexican Americans during an era of segregation. Las Debs de Corona served as an important means for Mexican American communities to examine civil and educational rights and offer valuable insight on social, cultural, and gender roles. These evocative photographs recall the often-neglected history of Mexican American barrio baseball clubs of the Inland Empire.
Mexican American Baseball in the Central Coast pays tribute to the teams and players who brought joy and honor to their fans and communities in Ventura and Santa Barbara Counties. Baseball was played before enthusiastic crowds in Piru, Santa Paula, Fillmore, Ventura, Oxnard, Camarillo, Ojai, Carpinteria, Santa Barbara, Goleta, Santa Maria, Guadalupe, Lompoc, and other communities. Players and their families helped create the economic infrastructure and prosperity that are evident today in the Central Coast. For women, softball was a social counterbalance to the strict cultural roles defined by society. Many former players dedicated their lives to the unrelenting struggle for social justice, while others devoted themselves to youth sports. This book remedies the glaring omission of baseball images and stories of Mexican American neighborhoods in the Central Coast of California.
The Inland Empire 66ers of San Bernardino is a minor league baseball team in San Bernardino, California. They are the Low-A affiliate of the Los Angeles Angels and play in the Low-A West. The 66ers play home games at San Manuel Stadium. They were members of the California League from 1987 to 2020. Mexican American Baseball in the Inland Empire celebrates the thriving culture of former teams from Pomona, Ontario, Cucamonga, Chino, Claremont, San Bernardino, Colton, Riverside, Corona, Beaumont, and the Coachella Valley. From the early 20th century through the 1950s, baseball diamonds in the Inland Empire provided unique opportunities for nurturing athletic and educational skills, ethnic identity, and political self-determination for Mexican Americans during an era of segregation. Las Debs de Corona served as an important means for Mexican American communities to examine civil and educational rights and offer valuable insight on social, cultural, and gender roles. These evocative photographs recall the often-neglected history of Mexican American barrio baseball clubs of the Inland Empire.
The Inland Empire 66ers of San Bernardino is a minor league baseball team in San Bernardino, California. They are the Low-A affiliate of the Los Angeles Angels and play in the Low-A West. The 66ers play home games at San Manuel Stadium. They were members of the California League from 1987 to 2020. Mexican American Baseball in the Inland Empire celebrates the thriving culture of former teams from Pomona, Ontario, Cucamonga, Chino, Claremont, San Bernardino, Colton, Riverside, Corona, Beaumont, and the Coachella Valley. From the early 20th century through the 1950s, baseball diamonds in the Inland Empire provided unique opportunities for nurturing athletic and educational skills, ethnic identity, and political self-determination for Mexican Americans during an era of segregation. Las Debs de Corona served as an important means for Mexican American communities to examine civil and educational rights and offer valuable insight on social, cultural, and gender roles. These evocative photographs recall the often-neglected history of Mexican American barrio baseball clubs of the Inland Empire.
Provides profiles of major league players with information on statistics for the past five seasons and projections for the 2005 baseball season.
Stretching from the years during the Second World War when young couples jitterbugged across the dance floor at the Zenda Ballroom, through the early 1950s when honking tenor saxophones could be heard at the Angelus Hall, to the Spanish-language cosmopolitanism of the late 1950s and 1960s, Mexican American Mojo is a lively account of Mexican American urban culture in wartime and postwar Los Angeles as seen through the evolution of dance styles, nightlife, and, above all, popular music. Revealing the links between a vibrant Chicano music culture and postwar social and geographic mobility, Anthony Macías shows how by participating in jazz, the zoot suit phenomenon, car culture, rhythm and blues, rock and roll, and Latin music, Mexican Americans not only rejected second-class citizenship and demeaning stereotypes, but also transformed Los Angeles. Macías conducted numerous interviews for Mexican American Mojo, and the voices of little-known artists and fans fill its pages. In addition, more famous musicians such as Ritchie Valens and Lalo Guerrero are considered anew in relation to their contemporaries and the city. Macías examines language, fashion, and subcultures to trace the history of hip and cool in Los Angeles as well as the Chicano influence on urban culture. He argues that a grass-roots “multicultural urban civility” that challenged the attempted containment of Mexican Americans and African Americans emerged in the neighborhoods, schools, nightclubs, dance halls, and auditoriums of mid-twentieth-century Los Angeles. So take a little trip with Macías, via streetcar or freeway, to a time when Los Angeles had advanced public high school music programs, segregated musicians’ union locals, a highbrow municipal Bureau of Music, independent R & B labels, and robust rock and roll and Latin music scenes.
A thorough guide to the upcoming baseball season provides detailed profiles of major league players, teams, and prospects, along with information on statistics for the past five seasons and projections for the 2007 baseball season. Original. 100,000 first printing.
Provides profiles of major league players with information on statistics for the past five seasons and projections for the 2004 baseball season.
Article abstracts and citations of reviews and dissertations covering the United States and Canada.
This dissertation documents San Bernardino's Mexican American people and their quest for civil rights in the day to day. Citrus and Santa Fe railroad workers, as well as Mexican middle class business owners, utilized defense committees, newspapers, baseball teams, mutualistas, and the local the Catholic Church, to counter discrimination, especially segregationist ordinances. I argue that San Bernardino's geographical placement as a gateway into southern California solidified the city as an important regional economic hub during the early twentieth century that ultimately nurtured the development of a diverse and distinct Mexican American community. Sol y Sombra explores how the city became an important space for the propagation of conceptions of juvenile delinquency and their use to uphold the segregation of public parks and pools. I reveal resistance to segregation through community grassroots mobilization. Led by the Valles family, Puerto Rican newspaper editor Eugenio Nogueras, and Catholic cleric Jose Nunez these efforts culminated in Lopez v. Seccombe (1944), one of the first successful judicial challenges to racial segregation. I connect how this little known case eventually made waves throughout the region by influencing other important legal challenges, including Mendez v. Westminster (1947).This study also showcases the Mitla Cafe as a centerpiece of community life and as a site that reveals the untold history of a prosperous Mexican American business community along Route 66. Moreover, this dissertation explores how postwar urban renewal projects, such as the development of the Inland Empire's U.S. 395 freeway contributed to the decline of this vital business district once renowned to travelers along Route 66. Ultimately, this study posits the Inland Empire and the city of San Bernardino as an important contested space for furthering our understanding of U.S. history.

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