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Do you love the taste of Red Lemonade, change into your swimming togs under a towel on the beach or find yourself admiring 'the grand stretch in the evenings'? Then this book, jammed with hilarious reflections on what it is to be Irish, will have you nodding in agreement with every turn of the page. Contains approximately 100 things that Irish people like, such as; Waving hello to complete strangers on country roads. Using the 'cupla focal' to stress our Irishness when on holidays. Going for a few pints after mass. Claiming a relative who fought in the Easter Rising. Explaining hurling to foreigners. Nicknaming statues, for example 'The Floozie in the Jacuzzi'.
Do you love the taste of Red Lemonade, change into your swimming togs under a towel on the beach or find yourself admiring 'the grand stretch in the evenings'? Then this book, jammed with hilarious reflections on what it is to be Irish, will have you nodding in agreement with every turn of the page. Contains approximately 100 things that Irish people like, such as; Waving hello to complete strangers on country roads. Using the 'cupla focal' to stress our Irishness when on holidays. Going for a few pints after mass. Claiming a relative who fought in the Easter Rising. Explaining hurling to foreigners. Nicknaming statues, for example 'The Floozie in the Jacuzzi'.
Do you know your "Doss Artists" from your "Doxies?" Want to give someone a piece of your mind with a wicked insult like, "You're as useful as an ashtray in a force-10 gale?" Find all that and more in this riotous, fascinating guide to Irish culture. It includes: Twenty-five of the most popular Irish surnames: where they originated, what they mean, and all that oul' blarney Enough Irish slang to pepper your conversations with and impress your friends Tried and tested Irish insults that are as wicked as they are craic A gansey-load of fascinating facts and interestingIrish trivia There is even a chapter filled with age-old Irish proverbs that will ensure you'll never be short of a few wise words. Get reading or you'll be in rag order!
A deadly compendium of all your favourite feckin' books Do you know the difference between a bowsie and a cute hoor? Can you sing all the words to 'Raggle Taggle Gypsy' or whip up a Beef and Guinness casserole with a side of Boxty? If these questions have you scratching your head, then look no further. Discover how feckin' deadly Irish Slang can be,find out why plastic-wrap played a vital role in the sex lives of the Irish in the seventies, learn the words to the most beloved Irish songs and get the recipes for the most famous and delicious Irish dishes. The Feckin' Book of Everything Irish is a laughter-filled guide to the genuine culture of Ireland.
For many years Ireland has been a popular tourist destination and tourism has been one of the most significant social, economic and cultural forces in Irish society. Irish Tourism: Image, Culture and Identity engages with major national and international debates on contemporary tourism through cutting-edge research. The book explores the multi-faceted nature of this important phenomenon, drawing on current work in sociology, cultural studies, ethnography, and language studies. For those who theorise about tourism and those who make practical day-to-day decisions on tourism policy, Irish Tourism will provide invaluable insights into historical and contemporary tourist representations, practices and impacts. In addressing issues such as the relationship between the local and the global in tourist settings, the construction of tourist imagery and products, and the development of tourism policy, contributors to Irish Tourism offer an innovative and critical analysis of the impact of global tourism on a small country. This book will be indispensable reading for students and scholars in Tourism Studies and Irish Studies and will also be essential for students of sociology, cultural studies, geography, languages and anthropology.
STORIES OF ADVENTURE & ACHIEVEMENT INVENTORS, GOLD-DIGGERS, MILITARY LEADERS, SPIES, RABBLE-ROUSERS, SOLDIERS, COURTESANS, ACE PILOTS DETECTIVES, ATHLETES, HEROES Irish people have left their mark on virtually every corner of the globe. This fascinating book tells the stories of the Irish who are justly celebrated in their adopted homelands, but virtually unknown in Ireland. William Melville from Kerry, the First Head of MI5 Monsignor Hugh O'Flaherty from Cork, who rescued 4,000 Jews and Allied Servicemen from the Nazis James Hoban from Kilkenny who designed The White House Jennie Hodgers from Louth who served three years in Union Army during the American Civil War - as a man George McElroy from Dublin who became one of World war I’s outstanding aerial aces And many more ...
Brief text explores the history, geography, government, cities, recreation, and people of Ireland.
In the years between the Great Famine of the 1840s and the First World War, Ireland experienced a drastic drop in population: the percentage of adults who never married soared from 10 percent to 25 percent, while the overall population decreased by one third. What accounted for this? For many social analysts, the history of post-Famine Irish depopulation was a Malthusian morality tale where declining living standards led young people to postpone marriage out of concern for their ability to support a family. The problem here, argues Timothy Guinnane, is that living standards in post-Famine Ireland did not decline. Rather, other, more subtle economic changes influenced the decision to delay marriage or not marry at all. In this engaging inquiry into the "vanishing Irish," Guinnane explores the options that presented themselves to Ireland's younger generations, taking into account household structure, inheritance, religion, cultural influences on marriage and family life, and especially emigration. Guinnane focuses on rural Ireland, where the population changes were most profound, and explores the way the demographic patterns reflect the rural Irish economy, Ireland’s place as a small part in a much larger English-speaking world, and the influence of earlier Irish history and culture. Particular effort is made to compare Irish demographic behavior to similar patterns elsewhere in Europe, revealing an Ireland anchored in European tradition and yet a distinctive society in its own right. Originally published in 1997. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.
Secondary education in Northern Ireland is currently based on a selective system according to academic ability with the use of an 11-plus style test. However, the DfES has announced that academic selection will be ended by autumn 2008, and a consultation document published in December 2005 set out proposals for new post-primary arrangements. Although it was felt to be inappropriate to undertake a full inquiry at this late stage in the decision-making process, the Committee's report contains oral and written evidence submitted by interested parties to the debate. The Committee notes that education is a formerly devolved responsibility and states its hope that there will be scope for detailed supervision of any reforms by a restored Northern Ireland Assembly, as well as by the House of Commons.
Examines the geography, history, economy, society, people, and culture of Ireland.
A guidebook with a decidedly different approach, the second edition of Mousejunkies is a collection of humorous travelogues and insider how-to secrets compiled after scores of trips to Walt Disney World. The book draws on the insights of a panel of Disney fanatics — The Mousejunkies — following dozens of personal vacations, trade shows and press trips in recent years. This second edition brings everything up to date with countless new tips, tricks, and tales. Mousejunkies provides tips and travel plans told through personal accounts – something that sets it apart from all the other guides. All of the most important topics are covered: When to go, where to stay, what to do and where to eat. But readers will also learn how to indulge in an all-day chicken wing and beer football orgy at Walt Disney World, how to extract your family from Fantasmic with your sanity intact, where to catch a mid-afternoon catnap in the theme park, and even how wrong a Disney cruise can go. Mousejunkies is more than one travel writer’s experiences at one of the most popular vacation destinations in the world. The Mousejunkies are a group of seemingly well-adjusted adults who have found themselves inexplicably drawn to Walt Disney World, again and again. Each has taken his or her own path, finding their way separately. When the smoke cleared, the group found itself back in reality, staring at one another over a pile of discarded annual passes and a useless collection of novelty hats. The stories - wry, humorous and told with an affection gained through years of Disney addiction - paint vivid portraits of a creatively engineered world, where unexpected surprises create lasting memories. The tips – valuable information designed to help readers get more out of their vacations – are told with a sly wink and the desire to share the secrets that make trips to central Florida more memorable. From touring plans to tongue-in-cheek reviews of the theme parks’ restrooms, Mousejunkies provides readers with useful information couched in obsessively-detailed narrative with a humorous touch.
Celtic Christianity—the form of Christian faith that flourished among the people of Ireland during the Middle Ages—has gained a great deal of attention lately. George G. Hunter III points out that, while the attention paid to the Celtic Christians is well deserved, much of it fails to recognize the true genius of this ancient form of Christianity. What many contemporary Christians do not realize is that Celtic Christianity was one of the most successfully evangelistic branches of the church in history. The Celtic church converted Ireland from paganism to Christianity in a remarkably short period, and then proceeded to send missionaries throughout Europe. North America is today in the same situation as the environment in which the early Celtic preachers found their mission fields: unfamiliar with the Christian message, yet spiritually seeking, and open to a vibrant new faith. If we are to spread the gospel in this culture of secular seekers, we would do well to learn from the Celts. Their ability to work with the beliefs of those they evangelized, to adapt worship and church life to the indigenous patterns they encountered, remains unparalleled in Christian history. If we are to succeed in “reaching the West . . . again,” then we must begin by learning from these powerful witnesses to the saving love of Jesus Christ.
During a Biblical seven years in the middle of the nineteenth century, Ireland experienced the worst disaster a nation could suffer. Fully a quarter of its citizens either perished from starvation or emigrated, with so many dying en route that it was said, "you can walk dry shod to America on their bodies." In this grand, sweeping narrative, Ireland''s best-known historian, Tim Pat Coogan, gives a fresh and comprehensive account of one of the darkest chapters in world history, arguing that Britain was in large part responsible for the extent of the national tragedy, and in fact engineered the food shortage in one of the earliest cases of ethnic cleansing. So strong was anti-Irish sentiment in the mainland that the English parliament referred to the famine as "God's lesson." Drawing on recently uncovered sources, and with the sharp eye of a seasoned historian, Coogan delivers fresh insights into the famine's causes, recounts its unspeakable events, and delves into the legacy of the "famine mentality" that followed immigrants across the Atlantic to the shores of the United States and had lasting effects on the population left behind. This is a broad, magisterial history of a tragedy that shook the nineteenth century and still impacts the worldwide Irish diaspora of nearly 80 million people today.
Spanning a broad trajectory, from the New Gaelic Man of post-independence Ireland to the slick urban gangsters of contemporary productions, this study traces a significant shift from idealistic images of Irish manhood to a much more diverse and gender-politically ambiguous range of male identities on the Irish screen.
Dominant social work and social care discourses on 'race' and ethnicity often fail to incorporate an Irish dimension. This book challenges this omission and provides new insights into how social work has engaged with Irish children and their families, historically and to the present day. The book provides the first detailed exploration social work with Irish children and families in Britain; examines archival materials to illuminate historical patterns of engagement; provides an account of how social services departments in England and Wales are currently responding to the needs of Irish children and families; incorporates the views of Irish social workers and acts as a timely intervention in the debate on social work's 'modernisation' agenda. The book will be valuable to social workers, social work educators and students. Its key themes will also fascinate those interested in 'race' and ethnicity in Britain in the early 21st century.

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