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How music has influenced mathematics, physics, and astronomy from ancient Greece to the twentieth century Music is filled with mathematical elements. The works of Bach are often said to possess a math-like logic, and Arnold Schoenberg, Iannis Xenakis, and Karlheinz Stockhausen wrote music explicitly based on mathematical principles. Yet Eli Maor argues that it is music that has had the greater influence on mathematics, not the other way around. Starting with Pythagoras, proceeding through Schoenberg, and bringing the story up to the present with contemporary string theory, Music by the Numbers tells a fascinating story of composers, scientists, inventors, and eccentrics who have played a role in the age-old relationship between music, mathematics, and the physical sciences. Weaving compelling stories of historical episodes with Maor's personal reflections as a mathematician and lover of classical music, this book will delight anyone who loves math and music.
The music industries are fuelled by statistics: sales targets, breakeven points, success ratios, royalty splits, website hits, ticket revenues, listener figures, piracy abuses and big data. Statistics are of consequence. They influence the music that consumers get to hear, they determine the revenues of music makers, and they shape the policies of governments and legislators. Yet many of these statistics are generated by the music industries themselves, and their accuracy can be questioned. Music by Numbers sets out to explore this shadowy terrain. This edited collection provides the first in-depth examination of the use and abuse of statistics in the music industries. The chapters are written by noted music business scholars and by practitioners in the field. The book addresses five key areas in which numbers are employed: sales and awards; royalties and distribution; music piracy; music policy; audiences and their uses of music. The authors address these subjects from a range of perspectives. Some of them test the veracity of this data and explore its tactical use by music businesses. Others are helping to generate these numbers: they are developing surveys and online projects and offer candid self-observations in this volume. There are also authors who have been subject to statistics; they deliver first-hand accounts of music industry reporting. The aim of this collection is to expose the culture and politics of data. Music industry statistics are all pervasive, yet because of this ubiquity they have been under-explored. This book provides new ways by which to learn music by numbers.
This book seeks to understand the music of the later Middle Ages in a fuller perspective, moving beyond the traditional focus on the creative work of composers in isolation to consider the participation of performers and listeners in music-making.
In this book, a leading authority on film music examines scores of the silent film era. The first of three projected volumes investigating music written for films, this thoughtful and pathbreaking study demonstrates the richness of silent film music as it details the way in which scores were often planned from the start as an integral part of the whole cinematic experience. Following an introductory chapter that outlines several key theoretical questions and surveys eight decades of writing on film music, Martin Miller Marks focuses on those scores created between 1895 and 1924. He begins by considering two early examples, one German (written by persons unknown for Skladanowsky's Bioskop exhibitions in 1895 and 1896) and one French (scored by Camille Saint-Saëns for the 1908 film L'Assassinat du Duc de Guise). Subsequent chapters fully discuss Walter Cleveland Simon's music for the American film An Arabian Tragedy (1912) as well as the Joseph Breil accompaniment to D. W. Griffith's Birth of a Nation (1915). As described in this book, Breil's memorable score--though a compilation derived from many sources--was played by an orchestra as Griffith's sweeping images filled the screen, thus contributing significantly to the great film's success while also achieving remarkable power in its own right. Marks then concludes with a look at Erik Satie's witty and innovative music for the French film Entr'acte (1924), which was the first film score of consequence by an avant-garde composer. Giving unprecedented attention to a vibrant, important, and oft-neglected facet of twentieth-century music, Music and the Silent Film will interest scholars of film theory, film history, modern music, and modern aesthetics.
Galileo Galilei said he was “reading the book of nature” as he observed pendulums swinging, but he might also simply have tried to draw the numbers themselves as they fall into networks of permutations or form loops that synchronize at different speeds, or attach themselves to balls passing in and out of the hands of good jugglers. Numbers are, after all, a part of nature. As such, looking at and thinking about them is a way of understanding our relationship to nature. But when we do so in a technical, professional way, we tend to overlook their basic attributes, the things we can understand by simply “looking at numbers.” Tom Johnson is a composer who uses logic and mathematical models, such as combinatorics of numbers, in his music. The patterns he finds while “looking at numbers” can also be explored in drawings. This book focuses on such drawings, their beauty and their mathematical meaning. The accompanying comments were written in collaboration with the mathematician Franck Jedrzejewski. ​
This textbook is a first introduction to mathematics for music theorists, covering basic topics such as sets and functions, universal properties, numbers and recursion, graphs, groups, rings, matrices and modules, continuity, calculus, and gestures. It approaches these abstract themes in a new way: Every concept or theorem is motivated and illustrated by examples from music theory (such as harmony, counterpoint, tuning), composition (e.g., classical combinatorics, dodecaphonic composition), and gestural performance. The book includes many illustrations, and exercises with solutions.
Distinguished physicist describes the scientific principles of musical sound in a non-technical way: development of human hearing, properties of sound curves, transmission and reproduction of sound curves, more. Includes 75 illustrations.
Why do the Nuer stipulate forty cattle in brideprice? Why is the number ten so important in North American mythology? What does the anthropologist Clifford Geertz really mean to say when he talks about the correspondence of Balinese time cycles? Numbers play some part, often quite central, in almost all known cultures, yet until now the subject has never been examined in detail from an anthropological perspective. This book is the first attempt to find out how people in a wide range of diverse cultures and in different historical contexts, use and understand numbers. The opening chapters provide the basis for looking at the way numbers operate in different contexts, by looking at the logical, psychological and linguistic implications. The following eight chapters deal with specific themes: ethnoscience, politics, measurement, time, money, music, games and architecture. The final chapter relates such operations to social, economic and cultural factors.
Provides advice for libraries on acquiring printed and recorded music; including information on preordering, the ordering process, secondhand and out of print materials, and more.
In Max/MSP/Jitter for Music, expert author and music technologist V. J. Manzo provides a user-friendly introduction to a powerful programming language that can be used to write custom software for musical interaction. Through clear, step-by-step instructions illustrated with numerous examples of working systems, the book equips you with everything you need to know in order to design and complete meaningful music projects. The book also discusses ways to interact with software beyond the mouse and keyboard through use of camera tracking, pitch tracking, video game controllers, sensors, mobile devices, and more. This book will be of special value for everyone who teaches music at any level, from classroom instructors to ensemble directors to private studio instructors. Whether you want to create simple exercises for beginning performers or more complex programs for aspiring composers, this book will show you how to write customized software that can complement and even inspire your instructional objectives. No specialist foreknowledge is required to use this book to enliven your experience with music technology. Even musicians with no prior programming skills can learn to supplement their lessons with interactive instructional tools, to develop adaptive instruments to aid in composition and performance activities, and to create measurement tools with which to conduct research. This book allows you to: -Learn how to design meaningful projects for composition, performance, music therapy, instruction, and research -Understand powerful software through this accessible introduction, written for beginners -Follow along through step-by-step tutorials -Grasp the principles by downloading the extensive software examples from the companion website This book is ideal for: -Music educators at all levels looking to integrate software in instruction -Musicians interested in how software can improve their practice and performance -Music composers with an interest in designing interactive music -Music therapists looking to tailor programs to the needs of specific groups or individuals And all who are interested in music technology. Visit the companion website at www.oup.com/us/maxmspjitter
The love you have always desired is in the Numbers… International bestselling author and media sensation Glynis McCants created this exciting guide to love through the power of Numerology because she believes that the greatest gift one can receive is that of true and lasting love. The secret is in understanding you and your partner by the Numbers, and gaining the insights you need to keep your love thriving! Glynis' celebrated system is a contemporary spin on the ancient Science of Numerology that is easy to use and amazingly accurate. She'll teach you the simple way to create a Numerology Blueprint that reveals what kind of mate would fulfill your—or a potential mate's—innermost needs and desires. If you're single, you'll learn how to pick the right partner from the start! If you're in a relationship that's lost its spark, you'll have the information you need to reignite the passionate love you once had. With Love by the Numbers as your guide, you can ensure that your love relationship stays healthy, satisfying, and on track for a lifetime. Acclaim for Glynis McCants L.A. Confidential magazine "To put it simply, if cupid and a clairvoyant were to have an affair, Glynis McCants would very much look like their offspring." Leeza Gibbons, talk show host "Whether it's the numbers of our favorite celebrity couples or our own bouts with cupid's arrow, we all want to gain more insight into what makes love work and how we can be better at it! Glynis' Numerology is like GPS for those who are tired of being lost on the road to love." John Edward, psychic medium "When I think about Numerology I think about two people: Pythagoras and his modern day equivalent, Glynis McCants, The Numbers Lady. Glynis has taken a historic metaphysical science and transformed it into an easy to understand, organized and quite honestly entertaining field of study. To sum it up, she's GOT your Number—now it's time for you to get it."
This insightful study places African American women's stardom in historical and industrial contexts by examining the star personae of five African American women: Dorothy Dandridge, Pam Grier, Whoopi Goldberg, Oprah Winfrey, and Halle Berry. Interpreting each woman's celebrity as predicated on a brand of charismatic authority, Mia Mask shows how these female stars have ultimately complicated the conventional discursive practices through which blackness and womanhood have been represented in commercial cinema, independent film, and network television. Mask examines the function of these stars in seminal yet underanalyzed films. She considers Dandridge's status as a sexual commodity in films such as Tamango, revealing the contradictory discourses regarding race and sexuality in segregation-era American culture. Grier's feminist-camp performances in sexploitation pictures Women in Cages and The Big Doll House and her subsequent blaxploitation vehicles Coffy and Foxy Brown highlight a similar tension between representing African American women as both objectified stereotypes and powerful, self-defining icons. Mask reads Goldberg's transforming habits in Sister Act and The Associate as representative of her unruly comedic routines, while Winfrey's daily television performance as self-made, self-help guru echoes Horatio Alger narratives of success. Finally, Mask analyzes Berry's meteoric success by acknowledging the ways in which Dandridge's career made Berry's possible.
John Birchensha (c.1605-?1681) is chiefly remembered for the impression that his theories about music made on the mathematicians, natural philosophers and virtuosi of the Royal Society in the 1660s and 1670s, and for inventing a system that he claimed would enable even those without practical experience of music to learn to compose in a short time by means of 'a few easy, certain, and perfect Rules'-his most famous composition pupil being Samuel Pepys in 1662. His great aim was to publish a treatise on music in its philosophical, mathematical and practical aspects (which would have included a definitive summary of his rules of composition), entitled Syntagma music Subscriptions for this book were invited in 1672-3, and it was due to be published by March 1675; but it never appeared, and no final manuscript of it survives. Consequently knowledge about his work has hitherto remained extremely sketchy. Recent research, however, has brought to light a number of manuscripts which allow us at last to form a more complete view of Birchensha's ideas. Almost none of this material has been previously published. The new items include an autograph treatise of c.1664 ('A Compendious Discourse of the Principles of the Practicall & Mathematicall Partes of Musick') which Birchensha presented to the natural philosopher Robert Boyle, and which covers concisely much of the ground that he intended to cover in Syntagma musica detailed synopsis for Syntagma musichich he prepared for a meeting of the Royal Society in February 1676; and an autograph notebook (now in Brussels) containing his six rules of composition with music examples, presumably written for a pupil. Bringing all this material together in a single volume will allow scholars to see how Birchensha's rules and theories developed over a period of fifteen years, and to gain at least a flavour of the lost Syntagma music
Discourse analysis and rhetoric are very much developed in communication, linguistics, cognitive science and artificial intelligence. Besides theoretical investigations, discourse analysis is central in a number of application areas such as dialogue and negotiation, the semantic web, question answering or authoring systems. Music is also a natural language, more abstract and mathematical, which follows very strict construction principles. However, there is very limited and no recent literature on Music Discourse analysis using computational principles. This book aims at developing a central issue in musical discourse: modeling rhetoric and argumentation. It also contributes to the development of high-level multimedia annotation schemes for non-verbal communication.
The Physics of Music and Color deals with two subjects, music and color - sound and light in the physically objective sense - in a single volume. The basic underlying physical principles of the two subjects overlap greatly: both music and color are manifestations of wave phenomena, and commonalities exist as to the production, transmission, and detection of sound and light. This book aids readers in studying both subjects, which involve nearly the entire gamut of the fundamental laws of classical as well as modern physics. Where traditional introductory physics and courses are styled so that the basic principles are introduced first and are then applied wherever possible, this book is based on a motivational approach: it introduces a subject by demonstrating a set of related phenomena, challenging readers by calling for a physical basis for what is observed. The Physics of Music and Color is written at level suitable for college students without any scientific background, requiring only simple algebra and a passing familiarity with trigonometry. It contains numerous problems at the end of each chapter that help the reader to fully grasp the subject.

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