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The Hermitage Museum in St. Petersburg has survived through 250 years of tsars, assassinations, fires, revolutions, and two world wars to become a global cultural destination housing one of the largest collections of art in the world. In an extraordinary memoir, the museum's longtime director takes the reader on a private tour of this global treasure. Holding one of the largest collections of Western and Oriental art in the world, the Hermitage is also a product of Russia and its dramatic history. Founded by Empress Catherine the Great in 1764, the stunning Winter Palace was built to house her growing collection of Old Masters and to serve as a home for the imperial family. Tsars came and went over the years, bloodily or peacefully, artworks were acquired and sold, buildings were burned down in terrible fires, and still the collections grew. After the violent upheavals of the Russian Revolution in 1917, the palaces and collections were opened to the public, ultimately enduring even the three-year siege of Leningrad (now St. Petersburg) by the Nazis in World War II. Now, in an unprecedented collection of illuminating essays, Piotrovsky explores the cultural history of a collection as rich in adventure as art. From fascinating intrigues, such as the Impressionist masterpieces recovered in Germany after World War II and hidden from the public for fifty years, to revelatory scholarship on the collection's incredible art and artifacts, these authoritative and engaging anecdotes make for an exceptional read. My Hermitage is a profound and captivating story of art's timelessness and how it brings people together.
This volume brings together in convenient form a rich selection of Japanese prose dating from the ninth to the seventeenth centuries, a period during which the preeminent cultural and aesthetic values were those of the Heian court. It contains 22 works representing all the major indigenous literary forms, either complete or in generous excerpts, and is particularly rich in writing by women and in autobiographical writings. This anthology contains longer selections than the only other available anthology, which was published in the 1950s, and each selection is preceded by an introduction reflecting the most recent scholarship. With three exceptions, all the translations are by the compilers, and almost all of them are published here for the first time. Because of space limitations, the compiler has omitted the two long masterpieces of the age, The Tale of Genji and The Tale of Heike, which deserve to be read in their entirety, and which are available in paperback English translations. The book contains an extensive general introduction, thirteen illustrations, five maps, a glossary, and a selected bibliography of works in English translation.
Set against a backdrop of historical political intrigue, this mystery follows Father Martin on his investigations into a set of gruesome murders. Headless bodies are surfacing, and Martin is under pressure from King Henry of Anjou to find an answer before Henry's proposed expedition to take over the territories of Ireland. Could the killings and the upcoming invasion be connected?
Drawn from Thich Nhat Hanh’s Dharma talks given to young people, A Pebble for Your Pocket presents the basic teachings of the Buddha in accessible and modern language. Combining the stories and mediation practices from the previous edition of A Pebble for your Pocket with those collected in Under the Rose Apple Tree plus several new stories, this completely revised edition is written in a conversational style, and is comprised of Buddhist parables, and stories from the author's own childhood experiences. They elucidate principles of Buddhism and mindfulness practice, and give the young reader and their parents concrete advise on handling difficult emotions such as anger, from which the title - a pebble for your pocket - is taken. Written in a highly accessible style that doesn’t rely on lot of jargon or difficult vocabulary requiring breaks for explanation, Thich Nhat Hanh emphasizes the importance of the present moment through vivid metaphors, original allegories, and colorful stories. Young readers will learn about handling anger, living in the present moment, and "interbeing" — the interconnectedness of all things. Thich Nhat Hanh offers various practices that children can do on their own or with others that will help them to transform anger and unhappiness and reconnect to the wonders of nature and the joy of living in the present moment. This revised edition contains teachings and stories that the whole family can enjoy, as well as practices such as transforming anger in the family, instructions on how to invite the bell, breathing and sitting meditation, touching the Buddha inside, and others. This revised edition of A Pebble for your Pocket remains a unique and classic title in a market with few other substantial offering on this topic. It’s teachings on spirituality and awareness are thought provoking on a child's level. This significantly expanded version includes all stories and practices previously published in Under the Rose Apple Tree plus 3 never before published stories. With 10 b/w illustrations by Philippe Ames and Nguyen Thi Hop. Ages 6–13. (Second graders and up)
The hermit-monk Ryokan, long beloved in Japan both for his poetry and for his character, belongs in the tradition of the great Zen eccentrics of China and Japan. His reclusive life and celebration of nature and the natural life also bring to mind his younger American contemporary, Thoreau. Ryokan's poetry is that of the mature Zen master, its deceptive simplicity revealing an art that surpasses artifice. Although Ryokan was born in eighteenth-century Japan, his extraordinary poems, capturing in a few luminous phrases both the beauty and the pathos of human life, reach far beyond time and place to touch the springs of humanity.
Popular hunting/fishing personalities Jason Cruise and Jimmy Sites, also pastors, take outdoor enthusiasts deeper into God’s Word with this rugged devotional that draws comparisons between hunting seasons and the spiritual seasons of the soul. Into the High Country includes truth-revealing stories of adventure and space for writing down one’s own thoughts and experiences.

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