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A new expanded edition of the classic study of translation, finally back in print The difficulty (and necessity) of translation is concisely described in Nineteen Ways of Looking at Wang Wei, a close reading of different translations of a single poem from the Tang Dynasty—from a transliteration to Kenneth Rexroth’s loose interpretation. As Octavio Paz writes in the afterword, “Eliot Weinberger’s commentary on the successive translations of Wang Wei’s little poem illustrates, with succinct clarity, not only the evolution of the art of translation in the modern period but at the same time the changes in poetic sensibility.”
Provides translations of more than two hundred-fifty poems by over forty poets, from early anonymous poetry through the T'ang and Sung dynasties.
Weinberger's essays are like encyclopaedias in miniature, crammed with curious details that make you wonder at the strangeness of creation, and the ability of humans to make it even stranger. Wildlife is a collection which celebrates birds and fish, dogs and flies, ticks and mole-rats, and those two legendary creatures the tiger and the rhinoceros - both highly prized, both now almost hunted to extinction. No field of human knowledge is too remote, no fact too fanciful for his purpose, which is to lay before you the world of these animals and the minds of the humans who imagine them. Weinberger's previous collection An Elemental Thing was named by Village Voice one of the '20 Best Books of the Year' and his book What I Heard About Iraq is regarded as an antiwar classic.
A translation of the Spanish poem "Sunstone/Piedra de Sol" written by Nobel laureate Octavio Paz.
In an extraordinary montage of facts, sound-bites and testimonies, Weinberger assembles an uncompromising and blackly comic narrative which permits the voices of war to speak for themselves, and allows the protagonists and the apologists to damn themselves in their own words.
In a series of snapshots after the attack on the World Trade Center--from a day, to a week, up to a year and beyond--Eliot Weinberger offers thoughtful and provocative reflections on his city, the country, and the state of the world. Originally published only outside the United States, these essays are now available together, and for the first time in English. Taken as a whole, they constitute a remarkable "archive of the moment," way-markers for a story that is still unfolding.

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