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At the outbreak of war in August 1914, thousands of men from across the nation flocked to recruiting centres to sign up to serve in the Australian Imperial Force (AIF). This figure includes approximately 1,200 Aboriginal people. The lives of these men as civilians were often fraught with difficulty due to the attitudes and policies of the time. Despite legislative barriers to exclude people not of 'substantial European descent' from serving, 135 Aboriginal men with ties to Western Australia are known to have volunteered in World War I, including 83 who actively served, 50 who were rejected and three who contributed in an unofficial capacity - one of whom had previously been rejected. The motivations for volunteering were varied. We can assume that many who signed up saw it as an opportunity not to be missed, rallied on by the press that portrayed war service as fulfilling a sense of duty and patriotism. Some were caught up in the excitement of the moment, or attracted by the thought of a regular wage, while others simply followed their mates - light-hearted, confident and curious. There were also those who may have seen it as a chance to unshackle the inequalities experienced in their lives. This publication provides a snapshot of volunteers who were prepared to sacrifice their lives for their country and their stories.
This book is focussed at those who are working or are about to enter the workplace. According to the book, workplace may be defined as "any environment enabling work to be done". This broader definition will make the workplace include any situation or place where people interact to exchange knowledge and information. The book discusses the various anxiety and stress inducing events that one faces in the workplace and the ways to cope with them, using Rational Emotive Behaviour Therapy (REBT), and Cognitive Therapy (CT). These techniques are the most widely used psychotherapeutic techniques and their effectiveness has been tested scientifically throughout the world. The book attempts to show as to how Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (umbrella term for CT and REBT) can be used to challenge and overcome workplace stress issues such as criticism, abuse, animosity, conflicts, disagreements, insubordination, organisational politics, favouritism, prejudices, discriminations, job uncertainties, extreme work pressures, excessive workloads, poor job designs, job mismatches, role conflicts, role ambiguities, cultural and ethical maladjustments, workplace boredom and anger problems by realistically and accurately interpreting events at the workplace. It includes plenty of real-life stress producing scenarios as examples and specific techniques to challenge them. Moreover, it tries to analyze and solve workplace stress issues in a very lucid, simple and direct manner so that it appeals to and is understood by a wide range of people. The book is based on research and studies in the area of internal marketing, psychological counselling and workplace stress, and is the product of years of surveys and professional interactions in the industry and the academia.
Popular in the 19th century for its sweeping, adventurous, romantic plot and tender love story, the Saga of Fridthjof the Bold was largely neglected in the 20th century. Now, a new and fresh translation of both versions of this Old Norse saga restores it to glory. Also included is the swashbuckling Saga of Thorstein Vikingsson, the father of the hero Fridthjof; the Tale of King Vikar, telling of Fridthjof's descendants; and plenty of notes and commentary giving the saga's historical and cultural background. These tales of adventure, war, magic, and love can still thrill the heart today, as they did centuries ago.
The accelerating interpenetration of nature and culture is the hallmark of the new "light-green" social order that has emerged in postwar France, argues Michael Bess in this penetrating new history. On one hand, a preoccupation with natural qualities and equilibrium has increasingly infused France's economic and cultural life. On the other, human activities have laid an ever more potent and pervasive touch on the environment, whether through the intrusion of agriculture, industry, and urban growth, or through the much subtler and more well-intentioned efforts of ecological management. The Light-Green Society limns sharply these trends over the last fifty years. The rise of environmentalism in the 1960s stemmed from a fervent desire to "save" wild nature-nature conceived as a qualitatively distinct domain, wholly separate from human designs and endeavors. And yet, Bess shows, after forty years of environmentalist agitation, much of it remarkably successful in achieving its aims, the old conception of nature as a "separate sphere" has become largely untenable. In the light-green society, where ecology and technological modernity continually flow together, a new hybrid vision of intermingled nature-culture has increasingly taken its place.
"A sensitive, sensible, and compelling account of American education at its best."—Philadelphia Inquirer Described as one of the "101 Most Dangerous Academics in America" by right-wing critic David Horowitz, Michael Bérubé has become a leading liberal voice in the ongoing culture wars. This "smooth and swift read" (New Criterion) offers a definitive rebuttal of conservative activists' most incendiary claims about American universities, and in the process makes a supple case for liberalism itself. An important polemic as well as "a clear-eyed, occasionally quite humorous account of the joys and frustrations of running a college classroom" (New York Observer), this book is required reading for anyone concerned about the political climate on and off campus.
Widely regarded as Dickens’s masterpiece, Bleak House centers on the generations-long lawsuit Jarndyce and Jarndyce, through which “whole families have inherited legendary hatreds.” Focusing on Esther Summerson, a ward of John Jarndyce, the novel traces Esther’s romantic coming-of-age and, in classic Dickensian style, the gradual revelation of long-buried secrets, all set against the foggy backdrop of the Court of Chancery. Mixing romance, mystery, comedy, and satire, Bleak House limns the suffering caused by the intricate inefficiency of the law.

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