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Offers a collection of four romantic stories involving enchantment and passion.
She stole his roses. Fleeing the spotlight, burnt out rock star Layla—“Belle”—Dubois seeks refuge in the south of France. That old, half-forgotten heritage in a valley of roses seems like a good place to soothe a wounded heart. She certainly doesn’t expect the most dangerous threat to her heart to pounce on her as soon as she sets foot on the land. He wants them back. Matt didn’t mean to growl at her quite that loudly. But—his roses! She can’t have his roses. Even if she does have all those curls and green eyes and, and, and…what was he growling about again? Or maybe he just wants her. When an enemy invades his valley and threatens his home, heart, and livelihood, Matthieu Rosier really knows only one way to defend himself. It might involve kissing. And that might be just the start. Praise for Laura Florand’s novels “A poignant, lovely, moving, authentic story.” – Virginia Kantra, NYT bestselling author “Sweet, sexy, and all around delicious. I’m addicted. I can’t wait for the next book.” – Nalini Singh, NYT bestselling author “Chocolate, Paris, and a Greek god for a hero; this delectable confection has it all!” – Library Journal Starred Review “(Florand) captures the nature of love, its fierce, soul-warming necessity, in a way that will make you as happy as the finest bonbon could.” – The Barnes & Noble Review, a Best Book of the Year “Florand outdoes herself with this exquisite confection… painstakingly crafted and decadent as the sweets it portrays, leaving the reader longing for just one little taste.” – Publishers Weekly Starred Review “Adorable, charming, whimsical.” – Smexy Books “Romance at its strongest and most powerful.” – Dear Author, Recommended Read “A delectable summer bonbon.” – NPR Books
The "little story" told in this book was conveyed to the author from what he terms "the Voice of Silence" - that which the author knows in his heart to be Pure Love or "God." The author spontaneously received the story during a recent two-hour evening walk. It completely took him over, such that he spoke the story aloud as it came into his awareness. It was not an easy task to as vividly recall the story for sharing in writing. Still, the author has tried to do so, trusting that he has continued to be inspired in his heart and mind as the story has again unfolded.
A life, every life, has a story to tell, a real actual story. Subject and theme are the only variables in that life and the story it tells. In that reality of reality, one does not have to invent. It really happened. These real encounters do not require the embellishments and inventions of fiction. The empathy in these writings is that everyone can relate to someone else's experiences in their sometimes similarity where it will precipitate a nod of association or recognition in another life lived. Stories that could be told
Award-winning journalist Thanassis Cambanis tells the “wonderfully readable and insightful” (Booklist, starred review) inside story of the 2011 Egyptian revolution. Cambanis brings to life the noble dreamers who brought Egypt to the brink of freedom, and the dark powerful forces that—for the time being—stopped them short. But he also tells a universal story of inspirational people willing to transform themselves in order to transform their society. He focuses on two pivotal leaders: One is Basem, an apolitical middle-class architect who puts his entire family in danger when he seizes the chance to improve his country. The other is Moaz, a contrarian Muslim Brother who defies his own organization to join the opposition. These revolutionaries had little more than their idealism with which to battle the secret police, the old oligarchs, and a power-hungry military determined to keep control. Basem wanted to change the system from within and became one of the only revolutionaries to win a seat in parliament. Moaz took a different course, convinced that only street pressure from youth movements could dismantle the old order. Their courageous and imperfect decisions produced an uprising with one enduring outcome: No Arab leader ever again can take the population’s consent for granted. Once Upon a Revolution is “a welcome addition to the literature on Egypt’s uprising” (Library Journal). Featuring exclusive and distinctive reporting, Thanassis Cambanis’s “fluent, intelligent, and highly informed book…convincingly explains what happened in Egypt over the last four years” (The New York Times Book Review).
From wicked queens, beautiful princesses, elves, monsters, and goblins to giants, glass slippers, poisoned apples, magic keys, and mirrors, the characters and images of fairy tales have cast a spell over readers and audiences, both adults and children, for centuries. These fantastic stories have travelled across cultural borders, and been passed on from generation to generation, ever-changing, renewed with each re-telling. Few forms of literature have greater power to enchant us and rekindle our imagination than a fairy tale. But what is a fairy tale? Where do they come from and what do they mean? What do they try and communicate to us about morality, sexuality, and society? The range of fairy tales stretches across great distances and time; their history is entangled with folklore and myth, and their inspiration draws on ideas about nature and the supernatural, imagination and fantasy, psychoanalysis, and feminism. Marina Warner has loved fairy tales over a long writing life, and she explores here a multitude of tales through the ages, their different manifestations on the page, the stage, and the screen. From the phenomenal rise of Victorian and Edwardian literature to contemporary children's stories, Warner unfolds a glittering array of examples, from classics such as Red Riding Hood, Cinderella, and The Sleeping Beauty, the Grimm Brothers' Hansel and Gretel, and Hans Andersen's The Little Mermaid, to modern-day realizations including Walt Disney's Snow White and gothic interpretations such as Pan's Labyrinth. In ten succinct chapters, Marina Warner digs into a rich hoard of fairy tales in their brilliant and fantastical variations, in order to define a genre and evaluate a literary form that keeps shifting through time and history. Her book makes a persuasive case for fairy tale as a crucial repository of human understanding and culture.
Three brilliant scientists harness the power to fold time and visit the past and future like a common tourist. One scientist formulates a tour of Biblical events because he believes in God, but the tour is reluctantly and accidentally traveled by a scientist who does not. What will unbelieving eyes see, and how will they interpret the most significant supernatural events of all time? The tour embraces world history from the beginning of creation and into the future, where Biblical prophecy tells us that dangerous people will control the whole world, countless millions of people will evaporate, and society will plunge into darkness. What if a time traveler visited just two years into the future after the Biblical Prophetic clock has already started ticking? And then catapulted into the past, where Earth is like another planet entirely? What kind of world, and what kind of tribulation would he find? And as an unbeliever, how would he respond to it? Light deals with the issues of Biblical prophecy, recent young-earth creation, a literal and startling twist on how things were, and how things will be. Set aside the notions of being left behind, and embrace the idea of being brought along, in the circuits of Earth’s end-to-end timeline. Enter a future we’d rather forget, and a history that nobody remembers.

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