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Imagine overseeing a workforce so motivated that employees relish more hours of work, shoulder more responsibility themselves; and favor challenging jobs over paychecks or bonuses. In One More Time: How Do You Motivate Employees? Frederick Herzberg shows managers how to shift from relying on extrinsic incentives to activating the real drivers of high performance: interesting, challenging work and the opportunity to continually achieve and grow into greater responsibility. The results? An ultramotivated workforce. Since 1922, Harvard Business Review has been a leading source of breakthrough management ideas-many of which still speak to and influence us today. The Harvard Business Review Classics series now offers readers the opportunity to make these seminal pieces a part of your permanent management library. Each highly readable volume contains a groundbreaking idea that continues to shape best practices and inspire countless managers around the world-and will have a direct impact on you today and for years to come.
Managing people is fraught with challenges—even if you're a seasoned manager. Here's how to handle them. If you read nothing else on managing people, read these 10 articles (featuring “Leadership That Gets Results,” by Daniel Goleman). We've combed through hundreds of Harvard Business Review articles and selected the most important ones to help you maximize your employees' performance. HBR's 10 Must Reads on Managing People will inspire you to: Tailor your management styles to fit your people Motivate with more responsibility, not more money Support first-time managers Build trust by soliciting input Teach smart people how to learn from failure Build high-performing teams Manage your boss This collection of best-selling articles includes: featured article "Leadership That Gets Results" by Daniel Goleman, "One More Time: How Do You Motivate Employees?" "The Set-Up-to-Fail Syndrome," "Saving Your Rookie Managers from Themselves," "What Great Managers Do," "Fair Process: Managing in the Knowledge Economy," "Teaching Smart People How to Learn," "How (Un)ethical Are You?" "The Discipline of Teams," and "Managing Your Boss."
In his second book, The Compassionate Organization, Ethan Chazin business coach and organizational behavior expert explores how organizations build cultures that thrive by leveraging trust, ethics and a moral compass, developing powerfully engaging Vision and Mission statements, and applying the best practices to build effective workplace cultures including: hiring and retention strategies, emotional intelligence, effective communications, branding, diversity & inclusion, employee engagement and empowerment practices. The days of one employer per career are long gone. In todays contract economy, workers change jobs between eight to ten times by the time they reach 35 years old. Mature workers and Baby Boomers are leaving the workplace by the tens of thousands every day. This mass exodus of the Mature workforce and Baby Boomers coincides with Millennial workers taking over roles of increasing importance within organizations. Estimates are Millennials will constitute 75-80% of the American workforce by 2020. Organizations have been flattening out their employee ranks by casting off layers of middle management the last few decades. With this huge transfer in the balance of power from older to younger American workers, Millennials bring with them into the workplace a new set of organizational values, beliefs about work, and a set of ethics and expectations about appropriate organizational behavior. Millennials expect that the organizations they work for (and buy from) share their values, possess a moral compass, and must care for the environment. Thus, understanding how to build and maintain a compassionate organization should be top of mind for anyone tasked with launching, growing, staffing and leading an organization.
Foster a Culture of Innovation inside Your Organization Introducing a new approach that blends the practical applications of engineering with innovative concepts and techniques, Infusing Innovation into Organizations: A Systems Engineering Approach illustrates how a company’s culture influences innovation results and demonstrates how organizations can successfully create, explore, and test ideas. The book outlines an innovation framework representing a "systemic" approach that works within an organization’s culture (or context). It describes the principles and practices of innovation, relates these principles to systemic practices and the culture of a research and development organization, and incorporates innovation initiatives that can revitalize the performance of an organization. The book utilizes numerous case studies that help determine what makes an organization more likely to produce innovative products and ideas. Providing relevant background and a description for each case study, it details innovative activity, innovative impact, and the characteristics and features of each innovation. It also describes the principles and practices of innovation and relates these principles to systemic practices and culture in a research and development organization. Using systems engineering processes to apply innovation to operations, the authors: Describe general initiatives that have been, and could be, considered to address the principles of innovation in the context of an innovation framework Outline some indicators of effectiveness that can be used to implement a systemic organization-wide program Explain the linear and non-linear processes of design thinking (includes key methods and tools, and provides illustrative case studies) Offer an understanding of how to integrate problem-solving and underlying methods and tools into your organization Infusing Innovation into Organizations: A Systems Engineering Approach introduces a systemic approach that supports an innovative culture and describes novel approaches to addressing problems using creative, viable solutions. This book serves undergraduate and graduate-level professors and students in systems engineering as well as managers and consultants working in systems analysis and design.
A revolutionary new resource that brings documentation product management ideas up to date The 1994 bestselling classic Managing Your Documentation Projects set the industry standard for technical documentation. However, since then, much has changed in the world of information development. With this new title, JoAnn Hackos looks beyond the structured project of the 1980s and 1990s. Instead, she focuses on the rapidly changing projects of the 21st century and addresses how to introduce agile information development without neglecting the central focus of planning information design and development around the needs of information users. As an information-development manager, you are expected to reduce costs and project time, do more work with fewer resources and less money, and increase the value of the information you deliver. Recognizing this, Hackos has carefully designed this book to help you do precisely that. She helps you make strategic decisions about information development and directs the discussion of project management toward smarter decision-making. An update of the original 1994 Information Process Maturity Model (IPMM) presents you with a method by which you can compare the state of your organization to others, evaluate your current status, and then consider what is necessary in order to move to the next level. Information Development offers a completely new look at best practices for all phases of the document development lifecycle, including: Managing a corporate information portfolio Evaluating process maturity Partnering with customers and developing user scenarios Developing team effectiveness and collaboration Planning and monitoring information projects Managing translation and production Evaluating project performance Managing for quality, efficiency, and cost-effectiveness The companion Web site includes electronic versions of the templates and checklists featured in the book. Wiley Technology Publishing Timely. Practical. Reliable. Visit our Web site at www.wiley.com/compbooks/
There seem to be two realms in our waking time: work and life. However, work is often juxtaposed against life, which is found in anything but work. Organizational work has become nothing more than the necessary evil, the means for a livelihood. Work has ubiquitously become the enemy of life. What culprit has dichotomized work and life? Public secrets! Empirically based, this book explores and testifies why the phenomenon of public secrets may have transformed our organizational life into a big lie to which we are all forced to subscribe-against private consciousness. Public secrets represent the communication phenomenon where public knowledge, though tacitly acknowledged and widely espoused, is never incorporated into organizational actions and daily routines. As a consequence, employees are not living their organizational life with their heads and hearts, but with our heels. "Employment with heels" is the biggest "un-economics" against time-it costs, wastes, and debilitates; it makes work the arch-enemy of life.

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