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As a child, Monkey D. Luffy dreamed of becoming King of the Pirates. But his life changed when he accidentally ate the Gum-Gum Fruit, an enchanted Devil Fruit that gave him the ability to stretch like rubber. Its only drawback? He’ll never be able to swim gain—a serious handicap for an aspiring sea dog! Years later, Luffy sets off on his quest to find the “One Piece,” said to be the greatest treasure in the world… Luffy and his Straw Hat crew duke it out with CP9, a band of dastardly world government goons headquartered on the island of Enies Lobby. CP9’s goal? Abducting Nico Robin, the Straw Hats’ newest crewmember, in order to activate an ancient weapon called Pluton. But when the enemy accidentally initiates a dreaded “Buster Call” military maneuver, the island and everyone on it is slated for complete annihilation!
Nami's sick! Now the Merry Go is without her navigator! Luffy and crew have but one choice--find land and hopefully a doctor. They miraculously stumble upon Drum Island, where it is eternally winter, but upon arriving they find out the island has only one medical professional--and she's a witch! With Nami's life on the line, Luffy sets out through the snow-laden fields to find this doctor, witch or not! -- VIZ Media
When Monkey D. Luffy accidentally gains the power to stretch like rubber at the cost of never being able to swim again, he and his crew of pirate wannabes set off in search of the "One Piece," the greatest treasure in the world.
This Omnibus E-book brings together all four issues of Southern Cultures Volume 15, published in 2009. Volume 15 of Southern Cultures explores Lee's Tomb, how Southern evangelicals kept sin from sacred spaces, the power of memorials, W.E.B. Du Bois's unusual connection to the United Daughters of the Confederacy, sundown towns, the African American architect who designed one of the South's elite institutions during Jim Crow, and both the Mississippi Delta and Core Sound Workboats in photographs. It also includes two theme issues with multimedia content, "The Edible South" and "Music." "The Edible South," our first food issue, includes the favorite foods of our favorite writers, Drum Head Stew from the Eastern Shore of Virginia, girls' tomato clubs, Wormsloe plantation, select short films on food from our friends at the Southern Foodways Alliance on the bonus DVD, and more. Our Fall special issue is our third music issue includes a never-before-published interview with "Son" Thomas, a brief history of the boogie, Ella May Wiggins, Top Ten best of jazz, blues, country, and rock greats, Emmett Till in music and song, and more. Enhanced with the 20 music tracks from the bonus CD, "Cool-Water Music," it brings together yet another eclectic mix of folk, blues, country, and alternative rock, from Pete Seeger to Whistlin' Britches to Charlie Louvin and George Jones to the Rosebuds. A feast! Southern Cultures is published quarterly (spring, summer, fall, winter) by the University of North Carolina Press. The journal is sponsored by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill's Center for the Study of the American South.
Momo realizes that she does not know much about new boyfriend Kiley, but while she is trying to strengthen their relationship, outside forces including Kiley's ex-girlfriend, Morika, try to break them apart.
The 618 documents in this volume span 1 September 1819 to 31 May 1820. Jefferson suffers from a “colic,” recovery from which requires extensive rest and medication. He spends much time dealing with the immediate effects of the $20,000 addition to his debts resulting from his endorsement of notes for the bankrupt Wilson Cary Nicholas. Jefferson begins to correspond with his carpenter, the enslaved John Hemmings, as Hemmings undertakes maintenance and construction work at Poplar Forest. Jefferson and his allies in the state legislature obtain authorization for a $60,000 loan for the fledgling University of Virginia, the need for which becomes painfully clear when university workmen complain that they have not been paid during seven months of construction work. In the spring of 1820, following congressional discussion leading to the Missouri Compromise, Jefferson writes that the debate, “like a fire bell in the night, awakened and filled me with terror,” and that with regard to slavery, Americans have “the wolf by the ear, and we can neither hold him, nor safely let him go.”

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