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As a child, Monkey D. Luffy dreamed of becoming King of the Pirates. But his life changed when he accidentally ate the Gum-Gum Fruit, an enchanted Devil Fruit that gave him the ability to stretch like rubber. Its only drawback? He’ll never be able to swim gain—a serious handicap for an aspiring sea dog! Years later, Luffy sets off on his quest to find the “One Piece,” said to be the greatest treasure in the world… The sky island of Skypiea is in danger of complete eradication if its maniacal leader Kami Eneru has his way. Luffy and his Straw Hat Crew entered the territory seeking a city of gold, but once the team befriends some citizens and learns the local lore, their mission turns personal. In an extended clash, Luffy and Eneru duke it out—Luffy’s rubber limbs and indomitable spirit against the Kami’s insane arsenal of weapons, including the terrifying and mysterious Golden Bell!
As a child, Monkey D. Luffy dreamed of becoming King of the Pirates. But his life changed when he accidentally ate the Gum-Gum Fruit, an enchanted Devil Fruit that gave him the ability to stretch like rubber. Its only drawback? He’ll never be able to swim gain—a serious handicap for an aspiring sea dog! Years later, Luffy sets off on his quest to find the “One Piece,” said to be the greatest treasure in the world… The sky island of Skypiea is in danger of complete eradication if its maniacal leader Kami Eneru has his way. Luffy and his Straw Hat Crew entered the territory seeking a city of gold, but once the team befriends some citizens and learns the local lore, their mission turns personal. In an extended clash, Luffy and Eneru duke it out—Luffy’s rubber limbs and indomitable spirit against the Kami’s insane arsenal of weapons, including the terrifying and mysterious Golden Bell!
As this volume opens, partisan politics in the United States are building to a crescendo with the approach of the presidential election. Working for a Republican victory, Jefferson consults frequently with Madison, Monroe, and others to achieve favorable results in state elections. He corresponds with controversial journalist James T. Callender. Sifting information from published rumors and private letters, he follows events in Europe, including Bonaparte's unexpected rise to power in France, and sees the value of his tobacco crop plummet as U.S. legislation cuts off the French market. Jefferson grows concerned at Federalist promotion of English common law in American jurisprudence and at proceedings in the Senate against William Duane, printer of the Philadelphia Aurora. Drawing heavily on British legislative practice, however, as well as advice from Virginia, he begins in earnest to compile a manual of parliamentary procedures for the Senate. As president of the American Philosophical Society, Jefferson calls for reform of the United States census. He publishes an appendix to Notes on the State of Virginia defending his account of the Mingo Indian Logan's legendary 1774 speech. And Jefferson consults Joseph Priestley and Pierre Samuel Du Pont de Nemours about the curriculum for a projected new university in Virginia. While continuing the reconstruction of Monticello, he mourns the death of the infant girl of his younger daughter, Mary Jefferson Eppes.
Contents Announcement of the 2016 Symposium Abbreviations Introduction Klyne Snodgrass North Park Theological Seminary Faculty Statement on Racism "Racial Realism" in Biblical Interpretation and Theological Anthropology: A Systematic-Theological Evaluation of Recent Accounts Elizabeth Y. Sung Response to Sung Valerie Landfair Reimagining Koinonia: Confronting the Legacy and Logic of Racism by Reinterpreting Paul's Letter to Philemon Lewis Brogdon Response to Brogdon Al Tizon The Bible's Outrage at Blumenbach's Babel: An Antiracist Hermeneutic for White Followers of Jesus Kyle J. A. Small Enemies, Romans, Pigs, and Dogs: Loving the Other in the Gospel of Matthew Love L. Sechrest Response to Sechrest Rebecca Gonzalez The Lynching of the Suffering Servant of Isaiah: Death at the Hands of Persons Unknown Bo H. Lim Response to Lim Evelmyn Ivens What's Missing? Theological Musings on a Hermeneutics of Absence Nestor Medina Response to Medina Bruce L. Fields "Lost in Translation: Ethnic Conflict in English Bibles"--The Gospels, "Race," and the Common English Bible: An Introductory and Exploratory Conversation Emerson B. Powery Response to Powery Michael O. Emerson An Indigenous Reinterpretation of Repentance Raymond Aldred Response to Aldred Mark Tao Truth Be Told: A Necessary Funeral Dirge in the Middle of Our Conversation Soong-Chan Rah Annotated Bibliography on Race and Racism Presenters and Respondents Ex Auditu--Volumes Available
This section of the History of al-Tabari covers the caliphate of Muhammad al-Amin, who succeeded his father, Harun al-Rashid on March 24, 809, and was killed on September 25, 813. The focus of this section is a single event, the civil war between al-Amin and his half-brother al-Ma'mun. Before his death, al-Rashid had arranged for the succession in a series of documents signed at Mecca and deposited for safekeeping in the Ka'bah. Al-Amin was to become caliph; al-Ma'mun was to govern Khurasan with virtual autonomy from Baghdad. Al-Amin could neither remove his brother from office nor interfere with his revenues or military support. Furthermore, al-Ma'mun was named as al-Amin's successor, and al-Amin was forbidden to alter the succession. If either brother violated these conditions, he was to forfeit his rights. It soon became apparent that the good will to carry out these arrangements did not exist. Disagreement broke out when al-Amin insisted that many of the forces that had accompanied al-Rashid and al-Ma'mun to Khurasan return to Baghdad. When the majority of army commanders obeyed the new caliph's orders, al-Ma'mun was enraged and countered with measures to secure his position. Angry letters were exchanged, with al-Amin pressing his brother to make concessions that al-Ma'mun regarded as contrary to the succession agreement. By March 811, military conflict was imminent. Al-Amin demanded that certain border districts be returned to the control of Baghdad. When al-Ma'mun refused, al-Amin despatched an expedition to seize the districts. Al-Amin's resort to force ended in disaster. Al-Ma'mun's forces, led by Tahir b. al-Husayn and Harthamah b. A'yan, quickly closed in on Baghdad. In a siege lasting over a year, Baghdad suffered extensive damage from the fighting and from bombardment by siege engines. Gangs of vagrants and paupers, organized by al-Amin into irregular units, fought a kind of urban guerrilla war. But, with Tahir and Harthamah enforcing the siege and with most of al-Amin's associates having switched their loyalties to the winning side, the caliph was forced to sue for terms. These were worked out among representatives of al-Amin, Tahir, and Harthamah. However, when the caliph boarded the boat that was to take him into Harthamah's custody, troops loyal to Tahir assaulted and capsized the boat. Al-Amin fell into the Tigris, was apprehended, and was executed that night on orders from Tahir. Thus ended this phase of the civil war. Al-Ma'mun was now caliph. Al-Tabari's history of these years includes accounts by participants in the event, diplomatic letters between al-Amin and al-Ma'mun, Tahir's long letter to al-Ma'mun on the circumstances of al-Amin's death, and a dramatic eyewitness account of al-Amin's last hours. Also noteworthy is a 135-verse poem describing the devastation of Baghdad. The section ends with a series of literary anecdotes on the character of al-Amin.
Danish Yearbook of Philosophy - Volume 31

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